How To Get Promoted Part 2

How To Get Promoted Part 2

Career Development – Get that Promotion; Part 2

How To Get Promoted – are you doing well in your present role but feel ready Get Promotedfor the next step up? Even in this tough economic climate some people are still managing to get promotion. But how do you make yourself part of that élite group? This is the second in a two post series.  Here is a link to Part 1 – link

How To Get Promoted – Last week I suggested that you should;

  • Create a portfolio of work you have done, showing your value to the organization,
  • Volunteer for more responsibility,
  • Create your own opportunity,
  • Let your ambition show but with discretion,
  • Ask for a private meeting to discuss properly how you are doing.
  • Now here are a further six tips to help you on your way.

Take a deep breath and blow your own trumpet

It is OK to do so if you know the notes to play. You can afford to brag a little, but with care. It doesn’t hurt to remind your boss of your accomplishments. Bosses are human and they do forget things; it helps if you can prompt and do it with facts and figures. Saying you are the Greatest may raise some laughs but that kind of bragging won’t make the kind of impression you want. If you have reduced costs or made some other improvement – quote the numbers. Make sure you concentrate on what is good about your performance, putting down someone else’s performance to make you look good isn’t impressive.

Blackmail doesn’t usually work

Avoid threats and demands. Making your boss squirm is not going to make them want to go out of their way to help you. Threatening to leave will not make your boss think better of you. Using it as blackmail can rebound and lead to doubts about your loyalty. Stay calm and if you feel frustrated, try not to show it.

Have friends in high places

Mentors further up the line are always valuable. If you can get someone on your side before you ask for promotion, it offers great benefits. You will be better informed about what life is like higher up. And it will show your boss you are serious about getting on. It gives you informal influence (outside the organization chart) and it will give you a friendly ear if things get a little tough.

Shine in your present post

Your present role gives you the opportunity to show what you can do. Push it as far as you can – go the extra mile. Work out what excellence really means in the job you do and make that the standard! Beat the deadlines and make a reputation for solving problems. That way you become someone who everyone wants on their team and they can see what an asset you will be at a more senior level. But don’t be personally indispensable. Build a structure that means the your team can function well without you, but make sure people know that it is your team. That way your boss won’t be so scared of losing you that they block your promotion.

Model more senior behaviour

Note how senior people in your organization behave. How do they talk, behave and think? Pick someone you admire and respect. Now use them as a role model. Start to behave in the way that you would like to be perceived.

Keep learning

Take every opportunity to learn more about your field, your profession and the organization in which you work. It will better equip you for a more senior role and it will also impress your boss. It will show that you are serious. About promotion. You will find lots of self-study material on-line which makes it a little easier to combine study with full-time work. No, it isn’t easy to study when you are working but if it is a real investment in you.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

Time to Make The Change

Time to Make The Change

Changing Careers – Part 3 Deciding Whether To Make The Change – A Checklist

Make The Change – this is the third and last part of our series for career changers. In Part 1 (Link below) we thought about whether career change could benefit you and suggested some questions that might help you to be clearer about your decision. In Part 2 (Link below) we considered how you can start building up a picture of your ideal job and find out which careers match it most closely.

Deciding to change career could be brilliant for you, but it is a big step. So you need to make sure you’ve thought of everything and you know what to expect. When you change career, you need to consider location, salary and the job market, for example. And you may also need to put some work into updating your skills and qualifications.

Here is a checklist of things to consider!

  1. Location You’ll need to consider location and how far you are willing to move. While you can probably find work as a florist in most large towns, if you’re looking to get into advertising, for example, there are likely to be more opportunities in London and other major cities.
  2. Salary and Promotion Most careers provide opportunities for promotion and you should check out what these might be. But it may not mean much more pay. You may have to decide between doing something you love or going for something less appealing with more pay.
  3. Time Changing career can eat away at your free time – you might need to work long hours, do voluntary work or study a course. Think about how this will affect others and whether you can really ask them to make the sacrifice. What about your partner, your children or anyone else you live with? Make sure you talk it over with them and let them know what will be involved. But don’t leave out the benefits – give them a balanced picture.
  4. The job market There’s competition in most careers, but some are more competitive than others. Careers that are seen as glamorous can be difficult to get into without plenty of unpaid work experience, enthusiasm and some luck. Make sure you understand what it is going to take.
  5. Working conditions What will doing the job actually mean for your day-to-day? If it involves meeting lots of people and that’s not your thing, you might want to think again. Would you prefer a job indoors, or wouldn’t you mind being outside in the depths of winter?
  6. Plan your finances This is the big one. Switching careers usually involves a drop in salary, as you try to establish yourself in a new field. Are you and your family prepared to lower your outgoings, do without holidays, share a car or use some savings for a few years, if that is required?

Changing Careers – Part 1 Where To Start! A Checklist for Career Change

Changing Careers – Part 2 Finding the right career to suit you

Help with career planning

If you need support form a coach in making a decision about a career change, please get in touch. I wish you every success in making your decision and, if it is right for you, making your career change.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

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Finding the right career

Finding the right career

Changing Careers – Part 2 Finding the right career to suit you

Finding the right career  – in Part 1 (link below)  we thought about whether career change could benefit you, and suggested some questions that might help you to be clearer about your decision. While it can be tempting to skip straight from that to looking at specific careers, it’s often a good idea to spend some time first thinking about what motivates you as a person and what you really want?

This is Part 2 of a three-part series;  In Part 1 we thought about whether career change could benefit you and suggested some questions that might help you to be clearer about your decision. In Part 3 (Link below) we have a check list to help you make a final decision on whether you really should make the change

Think about your interests, inside and outside work – what are you looking for from a career? Once you’ve worked this out, you can start building up a picture of your ideal job and you can find out which careers match it most closely

Finding the right career  – career planning: where to start!

Unless you’ve got a clear idea of what you want to do, it can be difficult to know where to start. And if you do have a career in mind, how do you know whether you’ve considered all your options?

As a starting point to finding the right career , you could try sitting down with a piece of paper and listing:

  • Courses you’ve taken in the past, or are taking now
  • Any jobs you’ve had, including voluntary work
  • Interests outside work
  • Any other significant experiences, like travelling

Then ask yourself:

  • Why you chose to do the things you have listed?
  • Which parts you really enjoyed?
  • Which parts you found frustrating or boring?
  • Which parts you were best at?
  • Which parts you found a challenge?
  • What have other people said about your contribution?
  • What other people have told you you’re good at?

You should start to see some patterns emerging; the types of skills you enjoy using, the sort of environment you perform best in and the types of people you like working with.

You can use this knowledge to help pinpoint areas of work you might enjoy.

Exploring types of careers

Once you have got an idea of areas you might want to work in, the next step is to check out some career profiles. These will give you information about the opportunities available in a particular line of work – and what skills and qualifications you’re likely to need.

Finding the right career  – you can find job profiles for over 800 different types of job, from archivist to zoologist, on the National Careers Service website at this link

Changing Careers – Part 1 Where To Start! A Checklist for Career Change

Changing Careers – Part 3 Deciding Whether To Make The Change – A Checklist

Help with career planning

If you need support form a coach in making a decision about a career change, please get in touch. I wish you every success in making your decision and, if it is right for you, making your career change.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

Taking A Career Break: Quotes and Resources

Taking a Career Break

Taking A Career Break: Quotes and Resources

Taking a career break! Lots of us think and may be dream about the idea of taking some time out from the daily grind. Here are some quotes on the experience. Plus I’ve included below details of two books to  help you on your way. And now the quotes…

  1.  It is energizing and liberating to turn down a road you have not traveled before. To reach toward what you cannot yet touch brings new passion and strength to your life. Ralph Marston
  2. Disconnect with your work self on a sabbatical, and you’ll reconnect with who you really are.  Corbett Barr
  3. It’s a time to immerse yourself in a different environment, try new things, reassess your priorities, and look at your life from a different perspectiveMarelisa Fabrega
  4. Give yourself the priceless gifts of new experiences, new skills, new knowledge and the confidence of knowing how quickly you can grow. Expand your horizons, again and again, and discover that every limit is there to be transcended.  Ralph Marston
  5. Getting away from it all might be the only way you can really reset or change course. If you continue around the day-to-day, making significant changes is tough. Taking a few months off will give you the space you need to figure things out. Corbett Barr
  6. Taking a sabbatical is the first step towards discovering whether or not I can take the leap of faith and do something fully on my own.  Do anything for a while, and it becomes increasingly harder to cut the cord. Sam Dogen
  7. Of Fortune’s best 100 companies to work for in America, 21 of them have paid-for, formal sabbatical programs. It’s a competitive advantage with regard to recruiting talent. Jaye Smith
  8. Almost everybody got back to some form of better eating and exercise, and they keep that up. And they say, “I didn’t realize what stress I was under. Now I can go back for my next five years with some balance” Rita Foley
  9. My sabbatical didn’t really recharge my batteries as I hoped it would.  Instead, the sabbatical helped realize my preference for freedom over a steady paycheck at this point in my life.  I’ve experienced what life could be like if I worked for myself and I must say that I’m extremely excited about the prospects. Sam Dogen
  10. Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed in the things that you didn’t do than in the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Mark Twain

Books on Taking A Career Break

Escape 101: The Four Secrets to Taking a Sabbatical or Career Break Without Losing Your Money or Your Mind by Dan Clements and Tara Gignac  

“What’s your dream escape? Relaxing on a palm-studded beach? A year off to write your novel? Missionary work with the needy? Exploring ancient ruins or saving the rainforest?

Whether you’re an adventurer, a poet, a volunteer or you just need a break, Escape 101 provides you with a step-by-step system to take as much time as you need from your job, career or business, without losing ground.”

A Gap Year for Grown Ups by Susan Griffith

“A guide for grown ups wanting to take the trip of a lifetime, containing information on specialist schemes and opportunities for professionals and mature travellers. Covers everything from what to pack to paying the mortgage when away, as well as advice from adult gappers who have been there and done it.”

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

Checklist for Career Change

Checklist for Career Change

Changing Careers – Part 1 Where To Start! A Checklist for Career Change

Is it time for you to make career change?

Checklist for Career Change – changing careers isn’t easy. But nor is it as hard as you might imagine. I’ve done it four times in my life successfully. I’ve enjoyed the different careers at the time and I really was successful in each one. For me, there came a time to move on. Changing in this way has allowed me to come to terms with a changing economic environment and each new direction has built upon the experience and knowledge gained in the last one.

Checklist for Career Change is Part 1 of a three part series; In Part 2 (Link below) we consider how you can start building up a picture of your ideal job and find out which careers match it most closely. In Part 3 (Link below) we have a check list to help you decide whether you really should make the change

If you think a career change could benefit you, answering the following questions might help you to be clearer about your decision.

Are you actually enjoying your job, day by day?

If you’ve recently stopped enjoying the day-to-day activities in your job, consider why this may be. You may just be bored and need a new challenge in your present organization. You might think about moving to a different department. Or perhaps a change of employer might be the answer.

If you actively dislike parts of your day-to-day job, ask yourself whether what you do is typical for someone in your type of work. Do you dislike the job because you don’t get the chance to use all of your talents? If you’re dissatisfied with the job itself, changing department or employer may not improve things. You may want to consider a more radical change.

Do you feel motivated by the people you work with?

How do you get on with colleagues, managers, clients and others in your workplace? Are any problems due to personality clashes with particular people or is it the culture of your workplace or the nature of the job itself? Do you like the people you work with but are frustrated by the actual work? If so, you may want to look at changing your role within the organisation or looking for a different role with a similar employer.

Are you satisfied with your work-life balance?

If you’re looking for a better fit with your family life, a change of job isn’t always necessary.

Technology is making it possible for more people to spend time working from home. You may have the right to ask your employer to make arrangements for flexible working. Your employer can refuse if there’s a good business reason to do so. But employers are becoming much more willing to consider flexible working?

Is the time right for you to take the risk?

If you have, for example, family responsibilities and others economically dependent on you, then changing now may mean putting others at risk. Also, are you prepared to risk what you have invested in your present role and possible loss of status, perhaps only temporary, in moving into a new field? You need to be very honest with yourself and with other people who may be effected by the change you want to make. In changing careers, timing is all; when you are dealing with lots of other changes in your life, this change may not be right for you at this time.

Changing Careers – Part 2 Finding the right career to suit you

Changing Careers – Part 3 Deciding Whether To Make The Change – A Checklist

Help with career planning

If you need support form a coach in making a decision about a career change, please get in touch. I wish you every success in making your decision and, if it is right for you, making your career change.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

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Your December Stock-take: Time for a Review

Your December Stock-take: Time for a Review

Your December Stock-take! Once a year it is a great thing to undertake a personal stock-take. This can give you the foundation for facing the New Year with confidence. The purpose of this review is to gain insight into some key dimensions of your work and life and to give you more clarity in career development.

Your career priorities change as your life and learning progresses. Regular review is integral to your continuing professional development.

Here are some questions to ask. You could try to get feedback from those around you as well as your self-evaluations.

What motivates you?

Understanding what is most important to you helps you make career choices founded on what motivates and satisfies you. You are then much more likely to achieve career fulfilment.

  1. What are your career priorities?
  2. Does your current job match your career priorities?
  3. What if anything is lacking?
  4. What could you do to bridge the gaps?
  5. What do you consider are your most significant achievements so far and what did you learn from achieving them?
  6. What didn’t go so well and what did you learn from that.

Work-life

The following questions help you identify your levels of accomplishment and work preferences. They could provide insight into how you might develop areas that are weak. They also help you make career choices that capitalise on your areas of strength and enjoyment, whilst reducing involvement in weaker or less enjoyable areas.

  1. What are the main tasks of your current work?
    • Tasks you perform well are…
    • Tasks you perform less well are…
    • Tasks you enjoy are…
    • Tasks you do not enjoy are…
  2. What are your key areas of expertise?
  3. Which of these areas do you need to develop further to enhance your effectiveness and career prospects? How could you do this?

Your skills

Compile a list of skills you use in that each of your work areas.

  1. What are your strongest skills?
  2. What are your weakest skills?
  3. What are the skills you need to work on to ensure you can do your current work effectively?

Work/life balance

To lead a happy and healthy life we all need to balance life at work with life outside work!

  1. Are you content with the balance between your work and life outside work?
  2. Are you content with the time you have for leisure, sport, relaxation?
  3. Do you have sufficient time for friends and family?
  4. What could you do to gain a better work/life balance? Could you ask for flexible working arrangements, for example?
  5. Is there work you need to do on your personal relationships? How will you do this?

Your network

Review your friend and contact list. This is your key development resource, whether looking for support, for a new job or looking for ways to develop within your current role. Advice, insight and information and support are all available from the people around you.

What can you do to develop your network?

Personal constraints overall

Sometime the barriers to our success come from within ourselves.

  1. Are there any internal constraints or de-motivators within you; pressures, negative thinking, health and fitness, or time issues holding you back from reaching your full potential?
  2. How could you overcome these?
  3. Should you seek help – for example from a coach?
  4. Who can you rely on to support your career development?

Career goals

Most successful people have set out with a goal. Often that goal changes along the way but it has still been a stimulus to action.

  1. What are your short-term career aspirations?
  2. What are the skills you need to develop to ensure you reach your short-term goal?
  3. What are your longer-term career aspirations?
  4. What are the skills you need to develop to ensure you reach your ultimate career goal?
  5. Where next?

If you are clear about your aims you are ready to begin planning how will you get there.

If you are unsure about your future career direction, then you may need help. Remember I offer a trial free half hour coaching session by phone or Skype.

Warm regards

Wendy
wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com
http://wisewolfcoaching.com

Finding Your Passion In Life – 7 Thought

Finding Your Passion In Life -7 Thoughts

by Dick Bolles on the CAREEREALISM website

1. “Passion” is a very broad word. Each of us chooses to define as we will.

It may vary from “work that gets me excited” to “this is why I believe I was placed on this earth.” When we are talking with someone about this subject, each of us may think we know what the other means. But often we are wrong. If we use it, we need to define what we mean by it.

2. “My passion” is related to, and dependent upon, self-knowledge.

Show teenagers, for example, a list of possible careers, and ask them which ones they feel any passion for, and they are liable to answer “None.” Come to that same person ten or fifteen years later, and they have gained in knowledge of the world of work. More importantly they have gained in knowledge of themselves.

Now they know, from experience, exactly what they like or don’t like. We, who are trying to help, may speed up that process by asking them to do a self-inventory. At any age. Typically, they will want a template for doing such an inventory.

3. “Passion” has seven parts to it.

The most helpful self-inventories always turn out to be those that correspond to the parts of a job. That is to say, every job has seven parts to it: it requires certain skills (do), certain knowledge (know), certain goals (reach), certain people environments (surround), certain working conditions (enable), certain locations (find), and a certain level of responsibility (chart).

Read more at http://www.careerealism.com/finding-passion-life/#j02Br7AMtvCXemzA.99

Self acceptance – learning to accept yourself!

Self acceptance – learning to accept yourself!

Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 7 Learning to Accept Yourself

Self acceptance – learning to accept yourself! You can find the earlier posts in this series at the links below. In the last few posts I’ve asked you to start thinking about emotions. I’ve explained how identifying your troublesome emotion helps you gain control and make sure things turn out more positively for you in the future. As well as that, I asked you to think about what is most difficult for you, then I asked you to set some goals.

In the last post we thought about challenging and beginning to change those core beliefs we all carry. They get in the way when we want to make a personal change that will improve our lives. Now we are going to think about developing self acceptance.

Everyone who has ever lived has had problems.  Having problems doesn’t make you a better or worse human being – nor does it make you different.  In fact it makes you truly a human being – someone who makes mistakes and sometimes suffers misfortune. You are not what you do or what happens to you.  You are you, and one of us, the vast human race.  But it is great that you want to change or improve something about yourself!

If you accept yourself with what you see as flaws, it means you can concentrate on problem solving.  If you can’t accept yourself you can very easily be distracted by shame and the time you spend putting yourself down.

There is a great way of illustrating self acceptance.  It is called the big i/little i diagram ( Lazarus 1977)

If you look closely you will that this Big I (the self) is made up of lots of little Is. The little I’s are all the things about you; “I’m tall”, “I’m short”,” I’m fat”, “I’m thin”, “I’m good at sports”,” I’m hopeless at maths” etc.  Or they might be things that you have done; “I failed my exam”, “I hurt someone I loved”, “I give to charity”, etc.  Anyone of them may be true.  But none of them makes up the whole, wonderful complexity of you, yourself.

Now, if you can’t accept yourself, you might find this idea difficult to accept as well. But think about it.  And think about what I said in the last post about how to test self beliefs.  Think of all the evidence there is that you are complex with many aspects and experiences.  Then think about how you see other people in their complexity.  Now, think about which is the more helpful way to think about your self.

So suppose you see the things that you need to change as little Is, that you can work on.  They are not the whole big I that is going to do the work. Start to recognise yourself as complex and multi dimensional.

You could draw a large I diagram and then start to put into it all the little Is about you.  The good and the bad – make sure you are even-handed.  Now, circle some of those good Is and really concentrate on them.  Then, think about the things you want to change and let that complex, wonderful Big I you, start to make plans.

Remember, self acceptance doesn’t mean you become complacent and stop trying to make changes.  Self acceptance changes how you see the changes you want to make.  It helps to makes those changes manageable and achievable.  It means you do not waste precious time on putting your self down and feeling bad.

Self acceptance doesn’t happen over night it takes work.  It takes a little time every day thinking about the Big I and focusing on your goals to make the change you want. Work on it because the benefits of self acceptance, in terms of happiness, mental health and achievement, are huge.

The next post in this series will about strengthening and re-enforcing your new self-helping outlook.

You can learn how to develop self-esteem and to develop self acceptance and I would like to help you.  Email me now to arrange a free half-hour taster coaching session by Skype.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

 

Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 6 Change Your Core Beliefs

Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 6 Change Your Core Beliefs

You can find the earlier posts in this series at the links below. In the last few posts I’ve asked you to start thinking about emotions. I’ve explained how identifying your troublesome emotion helps you gain control and make sure things turn out more positively for you in the future. As well as that, I asked you to think about what is most difficult for you, then I asked you to set some goals. Now we are going to think about challenging and beginning to change those core beliefs we all carry. They get in the way when we want to make a personal change that will improve our lives. As I’ve said before, success depends on being very honest with yourself.

We all carry unhelpful beliefs about ourselves, about other people and about the world about us. We gather them up as we go through life from our parents, our teachers, others about us and from things that happen to us. We learn to think, for example, that we are lazy or stupid. May be we think we are bad people, unworthy of happiness or success; or that people like us just never succeed! Most of these belief are not founded in anything real but we go on believing.

We may have failed at something once but that doesn’t mean we will not succeed this time or that we are less worthy of happiness.

There are three tests that we can apply to our core beliefs to see if it is worth letting them spoil the rest of our lives. They are

  • Logic

  • Reality-Testing

  • Helpfulness

Logic

If you have been unlucky enough to experience some kind of failure in life, such as, losing a job or a relationship, it isn’t logical to think of your self as a failure. Stop for one moment and think how you would judge a close friend or relation if they came to you and told you they were in the same place. What would you think and what would you say? So, why are you different? Is it sound, logical or consistent to apply different standards to you, to those you apply to the rest of the world? You are worthwhile even if you have failed lots of times – my word yes – you had the guts to try!

Reality-Testing

Does you core belief match with objective reality? Think of everything you have done throughout your life. Has every single thing been a failure? I doubt it. We all succeed at some things and fail at others. Think quietly about the good things you have done; things you have enjoyed and the things other people have liked and thanked you for. Gather evidence like a forensic detective. Where is the hard cold evidence that your core belief is really true – where does the balance of your life-long evidence lead you.

Helpfulness

What is carrying this core belief actually doing for you? Does it help you overcome your problems and feel better? Are you a “better” person because you carry this self belief? Some people do see calling themselves failures or unworthy as motivating them to do or be better. But for most of us, it just saps energy, erodes our self-esteem and makes us feel bad.

Coming to terms with the consequences of our core beliefs often helps us to have the confidence to get rid of them.

The next post in this series will about self acceptance. Accepting ourselves as we really are, is key to making that lasting change that is going to lead to real fulfilment and success in the future.

I know you can develop the confidence you need to change your core beliefs and I would like to help you.  Email me now to arrange a free half-hour taster coaching session.

Wendy Mason is a career coach working mainly with professional women who want to make that jump to senior level while having a life outside work. Before working as a coach, Wendy had a long career in both the public and private sectors in general management and consultancy as well as spells in HR. She now divides her time between face to face coaching, and coaching and blogging on-line. You can contact Wendy at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com and find out more at http://wisewolfcoaching.com

Coming shortly – the WiseWolf Career and Personal Development Programme – if you would like to know more email wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com

Earlier Posts in this series

  • Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 1 Admit A Change is Needed

  • Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 2 Be Clear About The Change You Want

  • Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 3 Be Clear About What Is Troubling You

  • Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 4 Identify what is most difficult for you

  • Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 5 Select Your Goals for Change

 

Chairmen, Leaders, Managers and the Blame Game.

Chairmen, Leaders, Managers and the Blame Game.

You can’t avoid reading about leadership, or more likely these days,  the lack of it.

If you read about business, current affairs, politics, sport – the list goes on and on – you’ll read about leaders failing.  And, of course, you will read endless opinions  about exactly how they have failed.  But we are all pretty certain that it is leadership that has failed.

The team didn’t win, the team played  poorly, or more likely right now, the team behaved very badly indeed and broke lots of rules. But is it down to leadership?  Has the leader let us down?

To answer that question you have first to be clear about what it is that a leader is supposed to do.

Well, in the crudest terms, the leader determines what it is you should win. A leader creates and shares a vision for what it is you are to win and sets a direction for winning it. But the leader isn’t concerned with how you win, that is the role of management.

Mangers work out just how we are going to get to the winning post and they pick up the pieces to make sure we get there, intact. 

What then do we mean by a failure of leadership? Has the leader not created and shared a vision? Have we set off on the wrong path? Or is it that no one sorted out how we would get there properly and no one put in those boring old systems to get us there within the bounds of ethics and legality. Or perhaps those systems were put in place but they are just no longer fit for purpose? 

So, perhaps we mean a failure of management after all. And it really does matter you know, because the chairman of the board doesn’t manage the organization. Some else does. Now I don’t know if they (the management) have committed sins of omission or sins of commission. But if they have sinned, just for once, please could someone brave enough to make a confession and clear the air for us all.

Wendy Mason is a Life and Career Coach.  She helps people have the confidence they need to be successful at work and to change career while maintaining a good work/life balance. You can email her at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com

  • How Many Leadership Styles Do You Need – Life Cycle Leadership

  • Leadership and Management; Acting With Integrity

  • Leadership, Management and Openness – Confidence and the Personal Development Mindset