So you think you are a great leader? Well here is a challenge! Part 3!

Arsenal V Manchester United: Football Fans: Ch...
What do they love?

Nothing great in the world has been accomplished without passion. Georg Wilhelm

In my last two  posts, I discussed how I started to think about leaders I’ve worked with and what the good ones had in common.  And that the more I thought, the more their success seemed to mould itself around the answers to a few relatively simple questions.

I thought of six main questions which of course then lead on to a number of subsidiary ones.  I asked the first two main questions on 8th April

Do people know why they are here?

Do you share the thinking?

and the second two on 11th April

What counts with you?

Are your managers up to the challenge?

Here today are the last two questions!

Do you really know what do they care about

Do you know what the people in your team are genuinely passionate about?  When was the last time you saw that spark in the eyes which shows real passion?  It may have had nothing what so ever to do with work.  What about when they are talking about the favourite soccer team.

Do you ever see anything like that when they are talking about work?

Perhaps not but there will be kinds of work,  and things  associated with work, that mean more to them than others.

You need to know those who work closest to you well enough to know what they are interested in! It is then up to them to do the same thing for their own team but you can ask if they have!

If you can, find roles for your team that aligns their work with their interests.

Occasionally, that can mean taking a risk and putting someone in an area where they don’t have much experience. But if performance in another role makes you think they can succeed in the new one, it’s usually worth it!  Their passion will fuel a strong desire to learn and grow. Once they’re up to speed, that passion can become a strong driver of innovation and growth.

Do you trust your people and do they know that?

One of the best things you can do is to let your managers know that you trust them and that you don’t intend to interfere in the day to day management of the organisation.

If they are any good, they will breathe a huge sigh of relief and double their commitment to you and your vision!

If you don’t trust them, you need to sort it out with them or move them out.

You won’t find that passion and commitment to the vision that I talk about above without trust.

Without trust your organisation will not deliver the superb performance that you crave.

Have the honesty to know if the real issues with trust are about you and not them.  If that is so, it is up to you to change yourself before you try to change them

So that is my list.  I’m sure it is by no means exhaustive?  What would you have expected to see?  What would you like to add? It has been quite a journey and I would love to hear from you

Wendy Mason works as a consultant, business coach and blogger. Adept at problem solving, she is a great person to bring in when that one thing you thought was straightforward turns out not to be! If you have a problem talk to Wendy – she can help you – email her at wendymason@wisewolfconsulting.com or ring ++44(0)7867681439


So you think you are a great leader? Well here is a challenge! Part 2!

A helicopter is taking off Greenland Ice Sheet
“Keep away from people who try to belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you, too, can become great.”
Mark Twain
In my last post, I explained how I started to think about leaders I’ve worked with and what the good ones had in common.  And that the more I thought, the more their success seemed to mould itself around the answers to a few relatively simple questions.

I thought of six main questions which of course then lead on to a number of subsidiary ones.  I asked the first two main questions on 8th April:

Do people know why they are here?

Do you share the thinking?

The two questions for today are below and the last two should be here on Wednesday (13th April 2011)

What counts with you?

If you are a leader, you concentrate on the big picture.  When you stray into what you consider “essential” detail,  you need to be very clear what you mean and what the consequences might be!

If you have good people, the right governance regime and clarity about the goals; why would you need to dabble in the nitty gritty of day to day administration? Much better to stay up in your helicopter surveying the overall  country and deciding where to lead next!

When you dabble among other things you erase the confidence of your managers both in you and to a certain extent in themselves.  They will feel you don’t trust them to do the job they are employed to do! Besides, being a good leader doesn’t necessarily make you as good a manager as them!

If you don’t have good people, then make sure systems are put in place to train or replace them.

If you don’t have a governance regime that can stand up to scrutiny, then you need to do something and fast.

And yes, you do need to make sure that vision of yours has been turned into clear and achievable goals!

I know you can create a culture of performance by setting aggressive goals and holding your managers accountable for delivering them.  But if those goals are so aggressive  they fail constantly, they will give up trying and, if they are any good, they may move on pretty quickly.

Make sure your targets are a stretch but achievable.  And reassess them regularly because the world moves on.  They can scaled up or down

Are your managers up to the challenge?

This carries forward the issues raised above!  Have you got the right people in your senior management seats?  You need to be clear about the answer!  If you are new to the organisation. take stock of all the talent you have available and if necessary reshuffle the deck!

You need a  good team to have a chance of success. Don’t keep someone around just because they’ve been there a long time! You won’t achieve your vision if you don’t have managers who know how to manage! But give people a fair chance to succeed and be prepared to invest in good people.

Well,  that is plenty to think about for Monday! I’m still wondering if there is a leader out there who is brave enough to share your answers.  If there is I’d love to hear from you.  As I said before, I think honesty and bravery are key characteristics of great leaders and it’s not enough to be just good enough when it comes to leadership.

Related articles

Wendy Mason works as a consultant, business coach and blogger. Adept at problem solving, she is a great person to bring in when that one thing you thought was straightforward turns out not to be! If you have a problem talk to Wendy – she can help you – email her at wendymason@wisewolfconsulting.com or ring ++44(0)7867681439

So you think you are a great leader? Well here is a challenge!

Left: CARL VENNE, Crow Indian Tribal Chairman ...
CARL VENNE, CROW INDIAN TRIBAL CHAIRMAN AND BARACK OBAMA

“Vision without action is a daydream. Action without vision is a nightmare.”   Japanese Proverb

I started to think about leaders I’ve worked with and what the good ones had in common.

The more I thought, the more their success seemed to mould itself around the answers to a few relatively simple questions.  Well actually those simple questions lead on to others more complex of course!

I’d love to see some of the less successful leaders I’ve known ask themselves some of these questions occasionally – I wonder whether the answer they’d give would be completely honest !

So I’ve decided to post two main questions today for you to think about over the weekend, two more will appear here on Monday (11th April 2011) and the last two should be here next Wednesday (13th April 2011)

Do people know why they are here?

Do you really share your vision?  Yes, I know you have a vision statement or some kind of grand statement of intent!  Yes I know it is on the intranet and, sure, it is at the front of your annual report!  It looks brilliant doesn’t it?  And you and the board thought the consultants you commissioned to develop it were pretty impressive.  But what do your people really think about it?

Yes, they can probably rehearse the words!

If they can’t you have real problems and a lot of work to do.

But let us assume they know the statement, do you talk to them about it?

Do you flesh it out and make it real?  Do you walk the talk – do you live the vision every day in your own work?  For example, if you say you are going to be a “listening” organisation, how good are you at listening?

If your vision doesn’t really mean anything to them what are you going to do about it?

Do you share the thinking?

One of your key responsibilities will be communicating new initiatives and strategy changes.

But do you go to your team with fully formed ideas without giving them the chance to contribute.

If so, how do they react? Are they defensive – do they resist the change you want to make?

What do you think would happen if you gave your key people an informal heads-up about the change you plan – let them know some of the reasoning behind it?

I suspect they would be grateful and even if they didn’t like what you plan to do they could begin to get used to it! That means when you make your announcement to the wider world they can back you up, at the very least!

If you shared an idea while you were forming it, they could add their thinking to your’s.  They might even warn you about that old elephant trap out there that you know nothing about, yet.  Wouldn’t that prevent some embarrassment?  You know what I mean don’t you?  You can remember last time?

Their contribution should be valuable, make your ideas stronger and should make your strategy easier to deliver.

When you can’t avoid springing something on your team, do you explain why and take the time to let them know the reasoning behind the decision?

Well, that is quite enough for a Friday post!  Plenty to think about! But I wonder if there is a leader out there who is brave enough to share your answers.  If there is I’d love to hear from you.  You see I think honesty and bravery are key characteristics of great leaders and it’s not enough to be just good enough when it comes to leadership.

Wendy Mason works as a consultant, business coach and blogger. Adept at problem solving, she is a great person to bring in when that one thing you thought was straightforward turns out not to be! If you have a problem talk to Wendy – she can help you – email her at wendymason@wisewolfconsulting.com or ring ++44(0)7867681439

What are your customers telling you they don't want? Learn from experience and stay focussed!

Red Herring

Today, I was going to write a third piece on scenario planning.

But I’ve decided not to!

This is for three reasons.

  • First the guidance on scenario planning produced by Shell provides a very good “how to”  guide
  • Second, I’m going to learn from the experience of my first two posts on this subject!
  • Third I’ve looked again at my mission statement and well…!

The first post was applauded as being an excellent summary.  But really I should have stopped there! The second post wasn’t taken up at all!

Oh I’m sure in due course it will get picked up by search engines.  It will pop up somewhere down the list of results when someone googles “ Scenario Planning”.

But really is that what I write for?

I write here to provide simple advice and guidance to those managing or going through change.

A detailed guide to scenario planning doesn’t quite fit the bill does it?

I got a little bit fascinated by scenario planning and off I went!

How often do you get distracted from your goals in life?  You set your heart on achieving a certain goal and something interesting comes along and off you run – the poor little pup is chasing the hare again – unless of course he is distracted by a red herring – see below!

Of course the journey may be interesting.  You may learn new things and find new directions.  But you certainly don’t achieve your goal.

Beyond the brief summary, there really wasn’t any reason to continue on about scenario planning and it certainly was not becoming more simple.

So now it is back to living the mission!

As for the second point, I need to learn from my customers/readers.  No point at all in going on delivering something that my readers don’t want to read.

Message, if you want to stay in business listen to your customers and stay focussed on what they tell you they want.  Make it your mission!

Note: The term “red herring” probably originates from an article published 14 February 1807 by journalist William Cobbett in the polemical Weekly Political Register. In a critique of the English press, which had mistakenly reported Napoleon’s defeat, Cobbett recounted that he had once used a red herring to deflect hounds in pursuit of a hare, adding “It was a mere transitory effect of the political red-herring; for, on the Saturday, the scent became as cold as a stone.” Courtesy of Wikipedia

  • Leading Change – Your Vision in an Uncertain Future – Scenario Planning (wisewolftalking.com)
  • Leading Change – Not Another Version of Wonderland – Scenario Planning Part 2 (wisewolftalking.com)
Wendy Mason is a performance, programme, contract management and change specialist. She works as a consultant, business coach and blogger. Adept at problem solving, she is a great person to bring in when that one thing you thought was straightforward turns out not to be! If you have a problem talk to Wendy – she can help you – email her atwendymason@wisewolfconsulting.com or ring ++44(0)7867681439

 

Leading Change – Not Another Version of Wonderland – Scenario Planning Part 2

The White Rabbit in a hurry

If I had a world of my own, everything would be nonsense. Nothing would be what it is, because everything would be what it isn’t. And contrary wise, what is, it wouldn’t be. And what it wouldn’t be, it would. You see?” Alice in Alice in Wonderland!

In scenario planning, scenarios provide a way to think about the uncertain aspects of the future particularly those that seem most unsettled and worrying.

Building and using scenarios can help organisations explore what the future might look like and the likely challenges of living in it.

As I explained in my last post a scenario is a story that describes a possible future. But no one view of the future will be correct. So scenario builders create sets of scenarios. These scenarios address the same questions and include everything that is likely to persist from the present into the future.

Each scenario describes a different way that the future might play out.

Scenarios are based on educated guesses and intuition and they need to be supported with very good information and strong analysis!  They are very carefully crafted structures.

But they are written as stories so that they can make that future seem vivid and compelling.  Without that, the real value in determining how the organisation might respond will be lost!

Using graphics, images and illustrations makes scenarios more comprehensible. They are particularly useful when the scenario needs to contain a lot of complex statistical information.

Scenarios  are not predictions – they are a way of dealing with uncertainty but no one has a crystal ball.  Factors will change!   But they provide a way to have a conversation about the future at strategic level.

Scenarios are a way to consider the potential implications of different events.  They mean teams can think through possible responses.

They provide a great way to get a group in the same room and using the same language.  This can be for a possible future or to help with thinking in a common way about current events.

Scenarios support a positive conversation about how to deal with future uncertainties and for making more successful strategic decisions

In my last post I mentioned that Shell has used scenario planning for quite a while! Well they have produced ‘Scenarios: An Explorer’s Guide’ for people who would like to build and use scenarios, and also for those who want to enhance their scenario thinking skills.  I will be providing a very simple guide to scenario planning here on Friday.  But if you wish, you can download the Shell guide at this link.

  • Leading Change – Your Vision in an Uncertain Future – Scenario Planning Part 1 (wisewolftalking.com)
  • Is Your Agency Doing Scenario Planning? (threeminds.organic.com)
  • Scenarios: mapping the possible (cognitive-edge.com)
Wendy Mason is a performance, programme, contract management and change specialist. She works as a consultant, business coach and blogger. Adept at problem solving, she is a great person to bring in when that one thing you thought was straightforward turns out not to be! If you have a problem talk to Wendy – she can help you – email her atwendymason@wisewolfconsulting.com or ring ++44(0)7867681439

Leading Change – Your Vision in an Uncertain Future – Scenario Planning

Image via CrunchBase

Every successful change programme starts with a vision of the future.  But where is your vision going to come from, when the pace of change is continuing to increase?

Scenarios are now widely used by governments, businesses and voluntary organisations to help them plan for the future. This can be done on a large or small scale; as part of a wider planning exercise or on their own as a way to develop thinking inside the organisation.

Scenarios are not simply snapshots but fully fleshed out stories of potential futures.  Each is researched in detail to allow the reader to fully imagine themselves in this future world and consider how they would respond.

Scenario Planning was first used by the Rand Corporation in 1948.

By the 1970s the technique had been further developed and was being used by the Royal Dutch Shell Company.

As faith in traditional planning tools weakened, interest in scenario planning grew stronger.

Both Sam Palmisano at IBM and Steve Jobs at Apple have used scenario planning successfully to help their companies deal with global change and uncertain futures.

Many organisations plan for the future or, at least, for a future that they believe or hope will happen.  Usually, this future is based on ‘best’ or ‘worst’ case projections of current trends.  And surprise, surprise, it often bears an uncanny resemblance to the present state;

  • Customers will continue to do and think as they do now!
  • They will make similar choices to the ones they make now!
  • Supply chains will stay the same!
  • Competitors will offer similar products and services!

So the organisation itself will continue to do more or less the same as it does now!

This approach works best in stable, predictable environments!  But for most of us now, that stable and predictable environment no longer exists!.  We are all facing greater uncertainty and experiencing more change than ever before.

We need an approach that helps us to

  • Make sense of what is going on,
  • Spot new trends and events
  • Prepare for that uncertain future
  • Make changes to what we do and how we work  ,

Scenarios are a tool that we can use to help us imagine and manage the future more effectively.

The scenario process highlights the principal drivers of change and the uncertainties facing organisations today!  It explores how they might play out in the future.

The result is a set of stories that offer alternative views of what the future might look like.

Through discussion, they allow us to explore what we would do differently in each scenario.  Then we can identify success criteria, consider new ways of working and define new relationships.

With each scenario, the factors, and how we might respond to them, will differ!  But we can practice what we might do and begin to plan for it!

The discussion about scenarios can help groups build a shared understanding of how to respond to the increasingly complex changes taking place in the world about us.

The great strength of scenario planning is that it can be used to look at today’s challenges from a different perspective. The process of identifying and examining how current factors and trends might play out in the future helps us focus on the likely impact of those trends on our own organisations.

Quite often, participants find that the impacts are going to be bigger and happen sooner than they had realised.

Ultimately, we can use scenario planning to help anticipate, prepare for or manage change.

I’m going to consider this theme further this week.  But if you have experience of scenario planning and its impact on your organisation, can you share it here please so that others can benefit

Related articles

  • Is Your Agency Doing Scenario Planning? (threeminds.organic.com)
  • Rehearsing the future [Guy Rigby] (ecademy.com)
  • 4 reasons why an increased pace of change means greater unpredictability (rossdawsonblog.com)
  • 1o Ways to be Better at Visioning (wisewolftalking.com)
  • Kotter Model Step 3: Create a Vision for Change (wisewolftalking.com)
Wendy Mason is a performance, programme, contract management and change specialist. She works as a consultant, business coach and blogger. Adept at problem solving, she is a great person to bring in when that one thing you thought was straightforward turns out not to be! If you have a problem talk to Wendy – she can help you – email her atwendymason@wisewolfconsulting.com or ring ++44(0)7867681439


Bewildered by the change you have to make – here is help!


Do you need to make a change in your organisation?  Does the prospect feel overwhelming?  Well why not use the simplest model of change – the Freeze Phase Model, also known as Square-Blob-Star!  This post tells you how to use it!  If you care about leading you organisation well and if you are committed to being a good manager, you have all you need need to implement this approach well!

This post appeared on my blog in July 2009.  It is one of the most popular pieces here and I believe that many readers have found it useful!  So I am have revamped it slightly with some links to techniques to use when you implement the model.  I’ve seen this approach work many times.  I wish you luck with your change and if you would like further advice, please get in touch!

In the early 20th century, psychologist Kurt Lewin identified three stages of change that are still the basis of many approaches today.

UNFREEZE

People like to feel safe and in control and their sense of identity is tied into their present environment particularly if it has been relatively stable for a while!  This creates a feeling of comfort and any challenges to it even those which may offer significant benefit, can cause discomfort. See why change hurts! Talking about the future is rarely enough to move them from this ‘frozen’ state and significant work is usually required to ‘unfreeze’ them and get them moving.  In frustration some managers may revert to using a Push method to get them moving – coercing them into a change.  The Pull method of leadership, persuasion and modeling behavior takes longer but has a much better long term effect . The term ‘change ready’ is often used to describe people who are unfrozen and ready to take the next step. Some people come ready for change whilst others take a long time to let go of their comfortable current realities.

TRANSITION

For Lewin change is a journey.  This journey may not be that simple and the person may need to go through several stages of misunderstanding before they get to the other side.  A classic trap in change is for the leaders to spend months on their own personal journeys and then expect everyone else to cross the chasm in a single bound. Transition takes time and needs leadership and support!   But sometimes  transition can also be a pleasant trap – it may feel better to travel hopefully than arrive – particularly for the team leading the change.

REFREEZE

At the other end of the journey, the final goal is to ‘refreeze’, putting down roots again and establishing the new place of stability – embedding new processes and developing a new culture.  In practice, refreezing may be a slow process as transitions seldom stop cleanly, but go more in fits and starts with a long tail of bits and pieces. There are good and bad things about this.   In modern organizations, this stage is often rather tentative as the next change may well be around the next corner. What is often encouraged, then, is more of a state of ‘slushiness’ where freezing is never really achieved (theoretically making the next unfreezing easier). The danger with this that many organizations have found is that people fall into a state of change shock, where they work at a low level of efficiency and effectiveness as they await the next change.

You can find out more at the following links

More of the Freeze Phase/Square-Blob-Star Model – general introduction continued

Getting ready for the Change (Unfreeze) – some unfreezing techniques

Helping people to change (Transition) – constructive ways to manage transition

Completing the Change (Refreeze) – constructive ways to embed the change and make sure it sticks


WHY YOU NEED A SOCIAL MEDIA STRATEGY!

If you had any doubts about the value and potential of  using social media, check out 30 Interesting, Useless and Pointless Facts on Jeff Bulla’s blog at the following link!  Don’t be put off by the title!

You begin to understand why you can’t afford not to know to about Social Media whether you are in the public, private or community sectors!

Here is just one example and three facts!

Generation Y awareness of the Ford Fiesta before Ford started their social media program was 0%. It was 37% as of a month ago and stands at 58% at 3 December 2009.

25% of Ford’s marketing spend is on digital/social media!

Ford is the only US Auto company not to take a government grand!

Now you begin to see the possibilities now that using LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook may bring?  We have some tips for developing a Social Media Strategy at this link

Unfreezing techniques – getting ready for change

Unfreezing techniques! Unfreezing is the first of Lewin’s change stages

Unfreezing techniques are not generally well understood! Unfreezing is the first of unfreezing techniquesLewin’s change stages (the Square). This is about getting people ready to accept change. You need some way of readying people for change in whatever Change Model you apply. The techniques below need to be applied with care and they are best used in combination. I have included what I regard as recommended approaches. Not included is “Command – just telling them they are going to change and expecting obedience. Nor is  the “Burning Platform” – ‘the platform is burning so we must jump’ approach. Those two techniques, I regard as cop-outs in most circumstances. Although they may have their place in a crisis – see the Evidence point below!

Visioning

Done well, visions work to create change. Visions work when they act to motivate and inspire the large numbers of people who are needed to make the change happen. To be motivating,  the vision must be memorable. For it to be memorable, it is usually surprising and short. To be surprising, it should be different from everyone else’s vision. If it is to be believed, it must be a regular part of the conversation of senior people.

Challenge

Inspire people to achieve remarkable things. Stimulate people into change by challenging them to achieve something remarkable. Show confidence in their ability to get out of their comfort zone and do what has not been done before. This works particularly well with small groups, as well as individuals. Once the group has bought the challenge they will bounce off each other to make it happen.  The approach is most effective when the people create their own stretch goals.  So, rather than telling them to do something, challenge them to achieve. Then, when they are fired up, ask them how far they can go.

Evidence

Cold, hard, data is difficult to ignore.  Say you have incontrovertible evidence staring you in the face. For example, the numbers are showing the company in the red or sales sinking into the sunset. Then, it is difficult to put your head in the sand and wish it away.  Cold, hard, evidence is a good way of changing minds. Counter-arguments require better data of sufficient strength to show your data as invalid.

Education and training

There is a gentler way of helping people see the need for change. This is by educating them about why change is necessary and how change can be managed. You could include presentations, communications and full-on training sessions.

Use of  Objectives

This means you agree with people what to do, but not how.  You set formal objectives that they are committed to achieve. But you do not tell them how they have to achieve them. In particular, if you can, give people objectives that they can only achieve by working in the intended change. Set a goal or formal objective that requires them to change.

Restructuring

You can redesign the organisation to force behaviour change. Just as function follows form, so will change follow the re-shape.  It will change how people behave. Newly formed groups that can cohere into separate units are more likely to become very internally motivated. Motivation is good, but the internal facing can be away from the organisation. So you must ensure that group goals are aligned. This is, for example, by regular external communications.

Rites of passage

Hold a wake to help let go of the past.  A wake is a party that is held to celebrate the life of someone who has died. It can also mean something to symbolise letting go of the past. Among unfreezing techniques this is often missed. When a change is completed, celebrate with a party or some other ritualised recognition. Mark the passing of a key milestone. You can also start a change with a wake – some kind of key event. Create new rituals to help shift the culture to a new form. Use these, if possible, to replace the rituals that already exist.

You need some way of readying people for change in whatever change model you apply. The unfreezing techniques described here work and they are best used in combination.

You will find a post on managing the next stage of change; Managing Transition here

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

 

GETTING READY FOR CHANGE – SOME UNFREEZING TECHNIQUES

Unfreezing is the first of Lewin’s change stages (the Square) – this is about getting people ready to accept change.  You need some way of readying people for change in whatever Change Model you apply.  The techniques below need to be applied with care and they are probably best used in combination.   I have included what I regard as recommended approaches.  I have not included “Command “ (just telling them they are going to change and expecting obedience) or  the “Burning Platform” ( the platform is burning so we must jump) approach which I regard as cop-outs in most circumstances – although they may have their place in a crisis – see the Evidence point below!  .

  • Visioning: Done well, visions work to create change. Visions work when they act to motivate and inspire the large numbers of people that are needed to make the change happen. For the vision to be motivating,  it must be memorable. For it to be memorable, it is usually surprising and short. To be surprising, it should be different from everyone else’s vision. To be believed, it must be a regular part of the conversation of senior people.
  • Challenge: Inspire people to achieve remarkable things. Stimulate people into change by challenging them to achieve something remarkable. Show confidence in their ability to get out of their comfort zone and do what has not been done before.This works particularly well with small groups, as well as individuals. Once the group has bought the challenge, then they will bounce off each other to make it happen. This is most effective when the people create their own stretch goals, so rather than telling them to do something, challenge them to achieve greatly, then, when they are fired up, ask them how far they can go.
  • Evidence: Cold, hard data is difficult to ignore.  When you have incontrovertible evidence staring you in the face, for example, where the numbers are showing the company in the red or sales sinking into the sunset, it is difficult to put your head in the sand and wish it away.  Cold, hard evidence is a good way of changing minds as counter-arguments require better data or sufficient strength to show the data as invalid.
  • Education and training: A gentler way of helping people see the need for change is by educating about why change is necessary and how change can be managed. This includes presentations, communications and full-on training sessions.
  • Use of  Objectives: Tell people what to do, but not how. Set formal objectives for people that they will have to achieve, but do not tell them how they have to achieve this. In particular, if you can, give people objectives that they can only achieve by working in the intended change. Set the person a goal or formal objective that requires them to change.
  • Restructuring: Redesign the organization to force behavior change. Just as function follows form, so also will changing the shape of the organization.  It will change how people behave.Groups that can cohere into separate units are likely to become very internally motivated. Motivation is good, but the internal facing can be away from the organization, so you must ensure that group goals are aligned, for example by regular external communications.
  • Rites of passage: Hold a wake to help let go of the past. When a change is completed, celebrate with a party or some other ritualized recognition of the passing of a key milestone. You can also start a change with a wake (which is a party that is held to celebrate the life of someone who has died) to symbolize letting go of the past. Create new rituals to help shift the culture to a new form. Use these, if possible, to replace the rituals that already exist.