Quotes On Trust

Quotes On Trust

Finding trust

Trust – the ability to have trust and the ability to be trusted are key components in human happiness.

Lao Tzu, traditionally the author of the Tao T...
Lao Tzu (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“Trust is the glue of life. It’s the most essential ingredient in effective communication. It’s the foundational principle that holds all relationships.”
― Stephen R. Covey

“Because you believed I was capable of behaving decently, I did.”
― Paulo Coelho, The Devil and Miss Prym

“I’m not upset that you lied to me, I’m upset that from now on I can’t believe you.”
― Friedrich Nietzsche

“We are all mistaken sometimes; sometimes we do wrong things, things that have bad consequences. But it does not mean we are evil, or that we cannot be trusted ever afterward.”
― Alison Croggon

“Remember teamwork begins by building trust. And the only way to do that is to overcome our need for invulnerability.”
― Patrick Lencioni, The Five Dysfunctions of a Team: A Leadership Fable

“In this world, there was nothing scarier than trusting someone. But there was also nothing more rewarding.”
― Brad Meltzer, The Inner Circle

“Either we’re a team or we aren’t. Either you trust me or you don’t.”
― Ally Carter, Heist Society

“It isn’t an easy thing to give your loyalty to someone you don’t know, especially when that person chooses to reveal nothing of himself.”
― Megan Whalen Turner, The King of Attolia

“If you are untrustworthy, people will not trust you.”
― Lao Tzu

“When the trust account is high, communication is easy, instant, and effective.”
― Stephen R. Covey, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People

Working with a coach really can make your life zing! Get in touch at the email email address below.
Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

Effective tactics for inspiring trust

Effective tactics for inspiring trust

Management: the four most effective tactics for inspiring trust

Effective tactics for inspiring trust – a global survey by The Forum Corporation has found that whilst trust in the UK workplace has suffered in recent years, there are certain actions that both employers and employees agree can bolster trust in addition to acknowledging personal mistakes. According to the survey, the four most effective tactics for inspiring trust are:

  • Listening to employees and understanding their concerns
  • Walking the talk – managers doing as they say
  • Following through on commitments
  • Encouraging employees to offers ideas and suggestions

Not hard really are they? How many do you put into practice? With thanks to H R Review and their post at this link http://www.hrreview.co.uk /hr-news/hr-strategy-practice/uk-bosses-rarely-apologise-to-their-employees/49381

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book your free 30 minute, no obligation, trial coaching session with Wendy Smith now at this Link 

Management: the four most effective tactics for inspiring trust

Management: the four most effective tactics for inspiring trust

Trust (Photo credit: thorinside)

A global survey by The Forum Corporation has found that whilst trust in the UK workplace has suffered in recent years, there are certain actions that both employers and employees agree can bolster trust in addition to acknowledging personal mistakes. According to the survey, the four most effective tactics for inspiring trust are:

  • Listening to employees and understanding their concerns
  • Walking the talk – managers doing as they say
  • Following through on commitments
  • Encouraging employees to offers ideas and suggestions

Not hard really are they? How many do you put into practice?

With thanks to H R Review and their post at this link http://www.hrreview.co.uk

/hr-news/hr-strategy-practice/uk-bosses-rarely-apologise-to-their-employees/49381

Thursday Quotes for Leaders and Managers – On Trust

Lao Tzu, traditionally the author of the Tao T...
Lao Tzu (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“Trust is the glue of life. It’s the most essential ingredient in effective communication. It’s the foundational principle that holds all relationships.”
― Stephen R. Covey

“Because you believed I was capable of behaving decently, I did.”
― Paulo Coelho, The Devil and Miss Prym

“I’m not upset that you lied to me, I’m upset that from now on I can’t believe you.”
― Friedrich Nietzsche

“We are all mistaken sometimes; sometimes we do wrong things, things that have bad consequences. But it does not mean we are evil, or that we cannot be trusted ever afterward.”
― Alison Croggon

“Remember teamwork begins by building trust. And the only way to do that is to overcome our need for invulnerability.”
― Patrick Lencioni, The Five Dysfunctions of a Team: A Leadership Fable

“In this world, there was nothing scarier than trusting someone. But there was also nothing more rewarding.”
― Brad Meltzer, The Inner Circle

“Either we’re a team or we aren’t. Either you trust me or you don’t.”
― Ally Carter, Heist Society

“It isn’t an easy thing to give your loyalty to someone you don’t know, especially when that person chooses to reveal nothing of himself.”
― Megan Whalen Turner, The King of Attolia

“If you are untrustworthy, people will not trust you.”
― Lao Tzu

“When the trust account is high, communication is easy, instant, and effective.”
― Stephen R. Covey, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People

Wendy Mason is a Life and Career Coach.  She helps people have the confidence they need to be successful at work and to change career while maintaining a good work/life balance. You can email her at wendymason
@wisewolfcoaching.com

Trust

Trust
Image by gorbould via Flickr

When people honour each other, there is a trust established that leads to synergy, interdependence, and deep respect. Both parties make decisions and choices based on what is right, what is best, what is valued most highly. Blaine Lee

One of the consequences of the current economic climate is a loss of trust.

For example, I grew up thinking of my bank as a fixed point in my life, something to be relied upon, rather like sunrise and sunset.  I had complete trust in it and many other similar institutions.  For reasons which you will understand, this is no longer so. I suspect I am not alone.

At its most basic, in the eighties, nineties and “noughties”, most people seemed to trust that life in the future would be at least as good as it had been in the past and probably better. Now that trust exists no longer. People are beginning to believe that it’s dangerous to trust anything or anyone any more. And that is dangerous!

The beauty of trust is that it eases worry and frees you to get on with life and work.

Lack of trust creates hidden agendas and guarded communication – it slows decision-making.

A lack of trust stifles innovation and productivity.

Trust, however, feeds collaboration, loyalty and, ultimately, results.

Trust means you;

  • Feel able to rely on someone,
  • Cooperate with, and experience, teamwork in a group,
  • Take thoughtful risks,
  • Communicate freely with others.

According to Dr. Duane C. Tway, Jr. in his 1993 dissertation, A Construct of Trust, trust is, “the state of readiness for unguarded interaction with someone or something.” He developed a model of trust that includes three components:

  • The capacity for trusting which means that your life experiences lead you to risk trusting others.
  • The perception of competence, which means you believe you and others can perform competently at whatever is needed in the current situation.
  • The perception of intentions, which means you believe the actions, words, direction, mission or decisions of others are motivated by mutually-serving rather than self-serving motives.

Trust lies at the heart of all strong relationships.  When trust is lost we feel betrayed, angry and taken for granted.

At work trust forms the foundation for effective communication, employee retention, and employee motivation. It fuels that extra effort people are willing to put into their work, voluntarily.

As a leader, you cannot afford to ignore trust!

Trust grows in relationships over time.  It happens when you develop knowledge and understanding of another person and believe in their authenticity. To gain trust you need to allow others insight into your character.

Your people need to learn that you are authentic and that they can be authentic with you about their feelings, opinions, and failures. The result will be a growing trust in you, not because you are the perfect leader or because you have a magic wand that can suddenly change the economic conditions in which you now have to work.  No, trust will grow because people believe you are both honest and honourable as their leader.

My word that is quite an obligation for you! But remember when trust exists in an organization, or in a relationship, almost everything else is easier and more comfortable to do. It can be the gel that holds the ship together as it weathers the storm.

Wendy Mason works as a Coach, Consultant and Writer. 

She works with all kinds of people going through many different kinds of personal and career change, particularly those;

  • looking for work
  • looking for promotion or newly promoted
  • moving between Public and Private Sectors
  • facing redundancy
  • moving into retirement
  • wanting to do a mid-life review

You can contact Wendy at wendymason@wisewolfconsulting.com  or ring ++44 (0)2084610114

The beauty of trust

The beauty of trust

Trust
Image by gorbould via Flickr

The beauty of trust – “When people honour each other, there is a trust established that leads to synergy, interdependence, and deep respect. Both parties make decisions and choices based on what is right, what is best, what is valued most highly.” Blaine Lee

One of the consequences of the current economic climate is a loss of trust.

For example, I grew up thinking of my bank as a fixed point in my life, something to be relied upon, rather like sunrise and sunset.  I had complete trust in it and many other similar institutions.  For reasons which you will understand, this is no longer so. I suspect I am not alone.

At its most basic, in the eighties, nineties and “noughties”, most people seemed to trust that life in the future would be at least as good as it had been in the past and probably better. Now that feeling exists no longer. People are beginning to believe that it’s dangerous to trust anything or anyone any more. And that is dangerous!

The beauty of it!

The beauty of trust is that it eases worry and frees you to get on with life and work. Lack of it creates hidden agendas and guarded communication – it slows decision-making.

A lack of trust stifles innovation and productivity. When you have it, it feeds collaboration, loyalty and, ultimately, results.

Trust means you;

  • Feel able to rely on someone,
  • Cooperate with, and experience, teamwork in a group,
  • Take thoughtful risks,
  • Communicate freely with others.

According to Dr. Duane C. Tway, Jr. in his 1993 dissertation, A Construct of Trust, trust is, “the state of readiness for unguarded interaction with someone or something.” He developed a model for it that includes three components:

Three components

  • The capacity for trusting which means that your life experiences lead you to risk trusting others.
  • The perception of competence, which means you believe you and others can perform competently at whatever is needed in the current situation.
  • The perception of intentions, which means you believe the actions, words, direction, mission or decisions of others are motivated by mutually-serving rather than self-serving motives.

Trust lies at the heart of all strong relationships.  When trust is lost we feel betrayed, angry and taken for granted.

At work trust forms the foundation for effective communication, employee retention, and employee motivation. It fuels that extra effort people are willing to put into their work, voluntarily.

As a leader, you cannot afford to ignore trust!

Trust grows in relationships over time.  It happens when you develop knowledge and understanding of another person and believe in their authenticity. To gain trust you need to allow others insight into your character.

Your people need to learn that you are authentic and that they can be authentic with you about their feelings, opinions, and failures. The result will be a growing trust in you, not because you are the perfect leader or because you have a magic wand that can suddenly change the economic conditions in which you now have to work.  No, trust will grow because people believe you are both honest and honourable as their leader.

My word that is quite an obligation for you! But remember when trust exists in an organization, or in a relationship, almost everything else is easier and more comfortable to do. It can be the gel that holds the ship together as it weathers the storm.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

 

So you think you are a great leader? Well here is a challenge! Part 3!

Arsenal V Manchester United: Football Fans: Ch...
What do they love?

Nothing great in the world has been accomplished without passion. Georg Wilhelm

In my last two  posts, I discussed how I started to think about leaders I’ve worked with and what the good ones had in common.  And that the more I thought, the more their success seemed to mould itself around the answers to a few relatively simple questions.

I thought of six main questions which of course then lead on to a number of subsidiary ones.  I asked the first two main questions on 8th April

Do people know why they are here?

Do you share the thinking?

and the second two on 11th April

What counts with you?

Are your managers up to the challenge?

Here today are the last two questions!

Do you really know what do they care about

Do you know what the people in your team are genuinely passionate about?  When was the last time you saw that spark in the eyes which shows real passion?  It may have had nothing what so ever to do with work.  What about when they are talking about the favourite soccer team.

Do you ever see anything like that when they are talking about work?

Perhaps not but there will be kinds of work,  and things  associated with work, that mean more to them than others.

You need to know those who work closest to you well enough to know what they are interested in! It is then up to them to do the same thing for their own team but you can ask if they have!

If you can, find roles for your team that aligns their work with their interests.

Occasionally, that can mean taking a risk and putting someone in an area where they don’t have much experience. But if performance in another role makes you think they can succeed in the new one, it’s usually worth it!  Their passion will fuel a strong desire to learn and grow. Once they’re up to speed, that passion can become a strong driver of innovation and growth.

Do you trust your people and do they know that?

One of the best things you can do is to let your managers know that you trust them and that you don’t intend to interfere in the day to day management of the organisation.

If they are any good, they will breathe a huge sigh of relief and double their commitment to you and your vision!

If you don’t trust them, you need to sort it out with them or move them out.

You won’t find that passion and commitment to the vision that I talk about above without trust.

Without trust your organisation will not deliver the superb performance that you crave.

Have the honesty to know if the real issues with trust are about you and not them.  If that is so, it is up to you to change yourself before you try to change them

So that is my list.  I’m sure it is by no means exhaustive?  What would you have expected to see?  What would you like to add? It has been quite a journey and I would love to hear from you

Wendy Mason works as a consultant, business coach and blogger. Adept at problem solving, she is a great person to bring in when that one thing you thought was straightforward turns out not to be! If you have a problem talk to Wendy – she can help you – email her at wendymason@wisewolfconsulting.com or ring ++44(0)7867681439