Job Search Success

Job Search Success

Job Search: The Keys To Success

Advice from Wendy Smith. Wendy is a Career and Life Coach helping you find fresh perspectives on life and your career.  You can book a FREE coaching session or find out more at this link

Job search successJob search success – over the last few years I’ve worked with a number of clients who have been very successful in their job searches. That means I’ve experienced what works best.

Here is what I think the common factors have been.

  1. Provide evidence that you can do the job. You are more likely to get a job if you have solid evidence you can do the kind of work you seek.  Don’t think you can bluff your way through. If you do get lucky and find yourself appointed you and then can’t do the work, you are likely to be sent on your way pretty quickly. This will make job search harder next time. The sad fact  is that few employers are likely to give you more than induction training at best. Use the time you spend without work to refresh your knowledge and gain qualifications if you need them.
  2. Build strong relationships. Being able to build relationships pays dividends. Yes, we can talk about networking all day – I often do.  But here I’m talking about learning to build rapport and establish relationships quickly with recruiters and potential new employers. If it doesn’t come naturally then go and work on your communication and relationship building skills.
  3. Do your homework. Successful job seekers do their homework. They research the market and keep up to date with new developments. They know who the key players are and what the culture is like in the organizations they want to target. They thoroughly research the background of potential employers and, if they can, interviewers
  4. Be prepared. Successful job seekers prepare thoroughly at each stage in the process. They leave as little as possible to chance. Work on being confident by practicing your presentations and your interview technique. Use visulising success to give you an edge.
  5. Keep up the energy. Above all, successful job seekers work hard to keep up energy and motivation. This means looking after themselves physically with diet and exercise.  Also, keeping themselves mentally alert and interested in what is going on around them. This may be tough but you need to make a commitment to staying positive despite the inevitable set-backs. The energy and positivity that you project at interview can make a real difference to your likelihood of success. 

Career coaches like me are around to help you thrive and succeed in difficult times. Get in touch at this link – I would like to discuss how I can help.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in helping people lead happier lives and feel more fulfilled. She has worked in management as well as coaching and personal development, as well as starting up her own businesses. That means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up a new business or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book a FREE coaching session with Wendy or find out more at this link

 

Job Search: The Keys To Success

Job Search: The Keys To Success

Job search – over the last couple of years I’ve worked with a number of clients who have been very successful in their job searches.

Here is what I think the common job search factors have been.

  1. You are more likely to get a job if you have solid evidence you can do the kind of job searchwork you seek.  Don’t think you can bluff your way through in this climate. If you do get lucky and find yourself appointed you and then can’t do the work, you are likely to be sent on your way pretty quickly. This will make job search harder next time. The sad fact in the present market is that few employers are likely to give you more than induction training at best. Use the time you spend without work to refresh your knowledge and gain qualifications if you need them.
  2. Being able to build relationships pays dividends. Yes, we can talk about networking all day – I often do.  But here I’m talking about learning to build rapport and establish relationships quickly with recruiters and potential new employers. If it doesn’t come naturally then go and work on your communication and relationship building skills.
  3. Successful job seekers do their homework; they research the market and keep up to date with new developments. They know who the key players are and what the culture is like in the organisations they want to target.
  4. Be ready to prepare. Successful job seekers prepare thoroughly at each stage in the process. They leave as little as possible to chance, work on being confident and practice their presentations and their interview technique.
  5. Above all, successful job seekers work hard to keep up energy and motivation. This means looking after themselves physically with diet and exercise.  Also keeping themselves mentally alert and interested in what is going on around them. This may be tough but you need to make a commitment to staying positive despite the inevitable set-backs. The energy and positive approach that you project at interview can make a real difference to your likelihood of success. 

You can do all these things on your own.  Though, as you would expect, I think it is much easier with the support of a career coach. If there is anything I can do to help you please get in touch.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

 

Beginning your job search

Beginning your job search

Beginning your job search – if you are just starting your job search this is what should you keep in mind?

Advice from Wendy Smith; Career Coach and author of The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book – order on Amazon

Beginning your job search is a challenge; here is some advice to help you. Remember all interesting journeys start with just one step. And I believe your first step should be made with attitude.

Be open to possibilities.

Most job seekers look for a new job similar to the one they just left. This makes sense in lots of ways. Among other things, we tend to define ourselves by the work we do. So it is understandable that the kind of work we look for is the kind of work we have done. But starting out with this approach is a little self-limiting. This might just be the time to consider something new! Take a little time to think about all the possibilities and don’t be afraid to dream a little.

The skill set you have may meet the requirements for a number of roles. What about opportunities for self-employment? Or you may wish to use some of this time to add to your skill set through training, developing a hobby or some kind voluntary work. You’d be surprised how many free courses there are online. Have a look at Coursera, Edx or Future Learn

Be prepared to make a big commitment.

Successful job search takes time. Among other things, if you want to win a job today, you need to invest energy into lots and lots of research. For example, you need to do your homework on potential employers. Find out what is happening in their marketplace and who are the key players. Also, if you want to tap into the hidden job market (those vacancies that are never advertised) you need to network, network, and network. Preparing your job search tools, for example, your CV takes time and attention. So devote as much time as you can. If you out of work, then make job search your full-time commitment. Plan each day as you would in the office. Find space at home to dedicate to your search if you don’t have the luxury of a home office. Make it pleasant but keep it work-related.

Be prepared to deal with rejection.

Getting the right job usually means bouncing back from lots of near misses. Your need to develop resilience – there is a post at this link that should help.The secret is to learn from each experience. Occasionally, you will need to accept that decisions are not wholly reasonable or fair. It is best to take none of it too personally. Yes, sometimes you don’t get a job because you made a mess of the interview. Accept that and resolve to do better next time. If you were well fitted for a role you didn’t get, then see it as their loss, not yours. Above all move on. There will be other roles and new possibilities to consider.

Beginning your job search – other resources to help you

If you have been out of the job market for a while, there will be new techniques to learn and some you need to refresh. From writing a modern CV to wooing them at the interview, you’ll find lots of tips on this blog, Try this link.”

Beginning your job search
A concise and practical little workbook. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

You can find more help for your job search in the “The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book: How to Win Jobs and Influence Recruiters.” Find this and my other books on my Amazon page at this link; http://ow.ly/BRSAL .

Remember working with a career coach can really help your job search. Get in touch at the Facing a mid-career dilemmaemail address below – I offer a free half hour trial session by phone or Skype. Meanwhile I wish you every success in your job search.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

 

New Week, New Job Search

New Week, New Job Search

So this is the start of a new week and for some of us it is the start of a new job search. And, if that is you, you will have heard all kinds of myths about how difficult it is going to be to find work.

First, yes, it is a challenge. But it is a challenge that lots of people are meeting and over coming. Lots of people are getting jobs and you can be one of them.

What you, the new job seeker, will find is lots and lots of advice and more people than you expect, willing to support you. You will certainly find lots of advice in the discussions published here. So check in regularly and if you are not finding what you need let me know. I’ll try to make sure that we cover it.

The key lessons I think I’ve learned from working with people looking for work is that it takes commitment, confidence, flexibility and resilience.

You need to commit time and energy to your job search and I know successful candidates who have chosen to spend 36 hours a week looking for work. Keeping a regular routine helps to keep up your morale anyway.

If you are not already a very confident person, or the experience that brings you here has knocked your confidence, then you need to get to work. You will find lots of books and coaches like me around hoping to help you.

Being willing to adapt and change to meet the needs of a changing market place opens up possibilities and, again, this is easier with more confidence. You need to work on being willing to adapt flexibly to meet the needs of a potential employer. You are never too old to learn new tricks. If you don’t believe me, get in touch, there are a few experiences I would be happy to share.

Resilience is something you may have to work at, too. Finding work generally takes a while in the present climate and you will probably have to bounce back from some knocks. You will be in good company though. I know lots of people who’ve been through this, only to be very successful at their next attempt or the one after that.

It’s important to keep your life fresh even though you don’t have a job. Make sure you eat properly and get some exercise. You could get involved in volunteering, take up new hobbies and new sports! You might surprise yourself, meet new people and discover talents you didn’t know you had. Who knows what new opportunities they may bring?

I wish all those starting out on, or a continuing, a job search every success and if I can help, please get in touch.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

Emotional Intelligence and Your Job Search

Using emotional intelligence really can help you succeed in your job search.

But what is emotional intelligence, and why is it that success in life sometimes seems unrelated to intelligence and how hard you are prepared to work?

It has been said that your IQ can land you a job but your lack of EQ (Emotional Intelligence) can get you fired. However, demonstrating emotional and social intelligence is becoming more and more important in your job search.

Many more recruiters and employers now appreciate that emotional intelligence and social intelligence are great determinants of the success you are likely to achieve at work.  A study from Virginia Commonwealth University  has shown that “high emotional intelligence does have a relationship to strong job performance  — in short, emotionally intelligent people make better workers.”  As a result, companies like Microsoft and Deutsche Bank now use EQ tests in their recruitment processes.

Derren Thompson, Manager, Diversity Recruiting for Sodexo, one of the largest services companies in the world reminds readers in their  blog that the “businesses that will succeed in the 21st century will be the ones that allow employees to bring the whole of their intelligence into the work force – their emotional and intellectual self. Not only does this impact morale, but productivity increases, too.”

Recognizing the significance of this, means you can use emotional intelligence to help you succeed in your job search.

But what is emotional intelligence?

In 1996 Daniel Goleman wrote his groundbreaking book “Emotional Intelligence“. His exhaustive research had confirmed that success in life is based more on our ability to manage our emotions than on our intellectual capability or our physical strength.

According to Howard Gardner, the influential Harvard theorist, “Your EQ (Emotional Intelligence Quotient) is the level of your ability to understand other people, what motivates them and how to work cooperatively with them,”

Emotional intelligence is the ability to identify, assess, and manage your own emotions, the emotions of others and also group emotions. It can also be a way of engaging with others that draws them to you.

EQ requires four capabilities;

  1. Self-awareness,
  2. Self-management,
  3. Social awareness
  4. Relationship management.

But EQ can do more for you in your job search than just impress a potential employer, it can help you decide what kind of role to go for.

One way to begin is to ask yourself two questions:

  • First, when do you feel excited or curious? This will help you be clear about your interests and passions.
  • Second,  work out what makes you upset, depressed and angry, and why? This helps you identify your core values and that often makes the difference in whether a job or career will be the right fit for you.

Understanding your emotions can also help you maintain your optimism and cope with stress during a long job search – it can help you stay positive while you find the right role for you.

If you would like to know more about emotional intelligence and how it can help you at work as a manager and leader, go to our sister site WiseWolf Talking– Leadership, Management, Career and Personal Development.  If you would like to know what emotional intelligence might mean for you in your life outside work then please visit WiseWolf’s Your Happiness Factor.

If you would like to read Dr Goleman’s book click on the picture link below and if you would like to try out an EQ test try this link http://testyourself.psychtests.com/testid/3038

Wendy Mason is a Life and Career Coach.  She helps people have the confidence they need to be successful at work and to change career. You can email her atwendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com or ring ++44(0)2084610114