Positive Job Search

Positive Job Search

Advice from Wendy Smith; Career Coach and author of The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book – Wendy’s books on Amazon

Positive Job Search – a positive attitude is key to successful job seeking. Finding a job can be an uncomfortable ride. And I sometimes hear pretty outrageous stories about how people are treated in the recruitment process. Finding yourself without a job, in uncertain times, remains hard.

But if you are going to be successful, you need to get past the negativity. And you need to be ready to learn. Job search has changed radically in the last 10 years. Just think for a moment about the impact of social media. And you may need to do some studying to update your professional skills. You can’t afford to be complacent about your value in today’s job market. Nor can you afford to waste energy on a negativity.

Tips for Positive Job Search

  • Acknowledge any grief and anger for what they are and seek help if necessary from a coach or counsellor to overcome them.
  • Learn to live in the present – practicing Mindfulness can help here.
  • Work on staying physically fit with a good diet, exercise and rest.
  • Approach the job market with an open mind and be ready to learn how it works now. In particular learn to use LinkedIn – it is an invaluable job search tool.
  • Work on understanding the real value you bring and improve that if you can with study.
  • Treat the recruiting employer as a customer. Accept that success comes from understanding their needs and showing how you can meet them better than anyone else. Remember it is about what they think they want, not what you think they should want.
  • Be flexible in terms of the work you are prepared to consider.
  • Network as much as you can – remember lots of very good jobs never get to into the hands of recruitment companies.

I’ve worked with a number of clients who thought they had no chance of securing another good job. Now, they are now in work and happy. If I can do anything to help you, please get in touch.

Other resources to help your job search

In the job market, there are always lots of useful techniques to learn or to refresh. From writing a modern CV to wooing at the interview, you’ll find lots of tips in my handy little pocket-book.

Stress-free Job Search
A concise and practical little workbook. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

A concise and practical little work book, it is for all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

Find this and my other books on my Amazon page at this link; http://ow.ly/BRSAL

Remember working with a career coach can really help both  job search and career resilience. Get in touch at the Facing a mid-career dilemmaemail address below – I offer a free half hour trial session by phone or Skype.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book your free 30 minute, no obligation, trial coaching session with Wendy Smith now at this Link 

Recruiting good people

Recruiting good people

Recruiting good people – recruiting the right people is crucial in ensuring your organization is successful.  It depends on you carrying out a number of activities.

Analyse the job

  • Analyse the job – make sure you take time to identify the competencies and experience required to do the job the standard you need. If you have an existing employee doing a similar job successfully, think about what they bring to the role
  • Write a job description that reflects what your analysis has established.
  • Create a competency framework for the role that you can send to potential candidates and by which you will judge them.
  • Write a person specification that reflects the competencies and experience required – no more and no less.

Choose the right recruitment approach

  • Choose a recruitment method and a selection procedure right and proportionate to the role. Check out a number of recruitment organizations Recruiting good peopleand ask them for advice  as well as how to create an inviting advertisement.
  • Create an interview plan showing how you will structure and carry out the interviews. It helps to have someone on the panel familiar with the work and someone who can give you an balanced view of candidates
  • Ask questions that will allow a candidate to give evidence of the competencies they have claimed. Ask for concrete examples of how they have solved the kind of problems likely to occur in your job.
  • Be fair, be open-minded and be courteous, when you interview.
  • Be ready for a good candidate to ask you some challenging questions about the work and your organization.

Recruiting the wrong person costs you money and causes disruption in the organization. It can cause low morale. If someone doesn’t really ‘fit’ they may quit very quickly and you will have to recruit all over again.  Or you are left sorting out problems. So, it worth investing in a good recruitment process.

You need a recruitment process that is

  •  EFFICIENT – cost effective
  • EFFECTIVE – attracts enough suitable candidates who are likely to fit into the organization
  • FAIR – stays inside the law in terms of avoiding unlawful discrimination and with decisions made on merit alone.

When you have a vacancy, the first thing you think of is replacing the person. But this is could be a great opportunity to consider whether the work is really needed. Also, how best to get it done. Perhaps it could be shared between existing staff. Does it really need a full-time replacement. What are the opportunities for part-time or flexible working?

I wish you good luck in the finding the right candidate for your role and if you would like some help please get in touch.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

Recruiting with Empathy

Recruiting with Empathy

Job Hunting, Recruiting and the Dangers of Lack of Empathy

Wendy Mason is a Career Coach and Life Coach helping you to solve difficult problems at work

Recruiting with Empathy – this post considers why this makes sense. Many moons ago when I was managing organizational change and the challenges of “downsizing” and “outsourcing,” I learned a salutary lesson. If the organization was going to thrive at the end of the exercise, empathy needed to exist at the beginning.

It sounds a contradiction doesn’t it? Setting out to manage what will be a painful experience for many but doing it with empathy. In my experience the most successful and well embedded changes are managed in just that way. This is not least because the communications, upon which successful change depends, require empathy with the reader in the mind of the writer.

Of course that demands a lot from the person who manages the change because they have to accept feeling the pain they are causing.

I was lucky.  My first experience of handling really painful change for a large group of people was when I was working for an enlightened employer. They provided me, as well as the staff I managed, with access to counselling. After that I learned techniques for handling my own feelings while doing a difficult job as well as I could.

What has all this to do with job hunting?

Well, now I am seeing a generation of recruiters who seem to have left their empathy at home when it comes to how they work. Candidates are being treated callously and with a lack of respect.

I really don’t know if this stems from a lack of imagination or if it is how some recruiters protect themselves from feeling overwhelmed.

What I do know is that these recruiters, who at the moment seem to be treating candidates like commodities, are thinking short-term.

The market is changing and more job opportunities are opening up. It may well not continue to be a “buyers’ market” for talented people.  Plus, some of those talented people being treating so badly could have turned into potential clients. But they will remember only too well which recruitment companies showed a lack of respect for them in their job search.

Resources for job seekers

In the job market, there are always lots of useful techniques to learn or to refresh. From writing a modern CV to wooing at the interview, you’ll find lots of tips in my handy little pocket-book.

Recruiting with empathy
A concise and practical little workbook. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

A concise and practical little work book, it is for all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

Find this and my other books on my Amazon page at this link; http://ow.ly/BRSAL

Remember working with a career coach can really help both  job search and career resilience. Get in touch at the Facing a mid-career dilemmaemail address below – I offer a free half hour trial session by phone or Skype.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book your free 30 minute, no obligation, trial coaching session with Wendy Smith now at this Link 

Confidence and Success at Work

Confidence and Success at Work

A very long time ago, one of my mentors, and I was lucky to be blessed with good mentors, told me not to let an opportunity slip through my fingers because of lack of confidence.

I didn’t really take what he said fully on board at the time. But, my word, I have thought of those words so often recently. I would say lack of confidence is the number one factor that I have seen hold people back from success at work.

Now, don’t let us kid ourselves here. I don’t mean that boundless confidence will win you a job for which you are obviously not fitted. I have seen that happen sometimes, though, as I expect you have. But I wouldn’t rely on it. You really do need to be able to do the job and you need to do your home work during the recruitment process.

But, however good you are, if you are full of reservations and doubts, then I believe you are very unlikely to get that new job or that promotion.

Having said that, lots of people don’t think about taking action to maintain or strengthen their self-confidence. Many seem to believe confidence is no more than gift and in part that is true. There are people who are born with it and others have early experiences that strengthen theirs. But, whoever you are, regardless of age, there is action you can take to strengthen your confidence and hence your chance of success at work. Time to do something, perhaps.

Don’t forget I offer a free half hour coaching session by phone or Skype to members of this group.

I wish all those starting out on, or a continuing, a job search this week every success.

Warm regards

Wendy
wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com
http://wisewolfcoaching.com

  • Bouncing Back from Bad News
  • Looking For a Job While Still Employed
  • Job Search: Your Help Is Needed

 

Email Etiquette for Job Seekers

Email Etiquette for Job Seekers

Email Etiquette – if you are using email to job search, for business, or to work on boosting your career, it’s important that all your communications are just as professional as they would be if you were sending old-fashioned paper letters.

Every email message you send need to be properly formatted, you need to spell correctly, your messages need to be grammatically correct, and it’s important write in paragraphs. Even though it’s email (or a LinkedIn message) when you’re corresponding regarding employment, you need to write carefully and properly.

Continue reading at http://jobsearch.about.com/b/2013/11/26/email-etiquette-for-job-seekers.htm

Make a recruiter take a second look!

Make a recruiter take a second look

CV Writing; How to make a recruiter take a second look!

Today we have a great guest post from Daryl Tomlinson who brings us advice based his long term experience of working with a job board

CV writing…

The art to writing a CV that get’s you a job has been documented more times than a Z list celebrities ever fluctuating waist line. Theories, fact, fiction, what to say, what not to say, all added to the mix of a thousand plus books. I think however that writing a CV is actually a simple procedure, once the don’ts are eliminated.

In a way you can equate a CV to speed dating, you only have a short time to impress. Of course with speed dating you are face to face, you can use speech, expression, whereas with a CV you are relying on the words laid out bare in front of a prospective employer, but essentially you are looking to get your skills, your personality and background ‘out there’ in a short amount of time.

Having worked with a job board for over twelve years, there are continuing themes that loops ever present from recruiters when it comes to CV’s. From layout to spelling, there are certain, defining areas that will ensure a recruiter will add your CV to the pile marked recycle. So with that in mind, here are just a few don’ts.

Surprisingly in this day and age, spelling seems still to be a problem and when spell checkers are readily available it does seem strange that CV’s are still winging their merry way to recruiters littered with errors. It is something that can infuriate a recruiter and whilst I don’t think many can profess to an immaculate spelling mind, it is still essential a CV doesn’t contain mistakes.

Layout is another fundamental problem. For a recruiter, they need a clear and concise theme, they need to grasp the very essence of who you are and what you could bring to their company as briefly and quickly as possible. So a CV that is all over the place will make a recruiter give up. In a way it’s a bit like a story, you want the reader to want to read more, get to the exciting conclusion.

So starting with who you are is a must, then the core elements that make you right for the job, your recent career history, skills and education. You can then expand your work life further on, give more detail before finally getting to the who you are away from work.

Stamping your personality on your CV is a hit and miss affair. You might attract a potential employer with a wacky, colour drenched encyclopaedia of your life and works, but you are also just as likely to put them off. It is better to layout your CV in a ‘traditional’ way, putting main points clearly and leaving that wacky bit for the interests part.

There is also something else recruiters cringe at and that’s the ‘obvious profile’, the kind of waffle that seems to go on for an ice age without actually revealing anything about the candidate. It’s easy to write how driven you are and clutter the surrounding space with metaphors that could have come from the corporate bible on how to say little by saying a lot, but essentially it is copy from a thousand CV’s that every recruiter has seen over and over again.

It almost goes without saying you are a hard worker, that you are honest, that you work until the job is done. When these descriptions are used all the time they become redundant and meaningless and can almost have a negative effect because the recruiter will simply bypass it. In my mind a profile should snap, it should say what you are, what you do, what you want. Yes! What you want! After all you are not blindly staggering to employment, you have a desire to work and you know what you want to achieve.

In essence you are looking to make a recruiter take a second look, a third look, an interview. They want to know what you can do, who you are, will you do the job, will you fit in? Substance, personality and requirement.

Substance – All you are and have done in terms of you career/work history
Personality – Who are you, not just in work but out as well
Requirement – Do you match the recruiters expectations?

The job market can seem a ferocious dog eat dog environment, so don’t you deserve to have an edge?

Daryl Tomlinson

 

CV Writing; How to make a recruiter take a second look!

CV Writing; How to make a recruiter take a second look!

Today we have a great guest post from Daryl Tomlinson who brings us advice based his long term experience of working with a job board

CV writing…

The art to writing a CV that get’s you a job has been documented more times than a Z list celebrities ever fluctuating waist line. Theories, fact, fiction, what to say, what not to say, all added to the mix of a thousand plus books. I think however that writing a CV is actually a simple procedure, once the don’ts are eliminated.

In a way you can equate a CV to speed dating, you only have a short time to impress. Of course with speed dating you are face to face, you can use speech, expression, whereas with a CV you are relying on the words laid out bare in front of a prospective employer, but essentially you are looking to get your skills, your personality and background ‘out there’ in a short amount of time.

Having worked with a job board for over twelve years, there are continuing themes that loops ever present from recruiters when it comes to CV’s. From layout to spelling, there are certain, defining areas that will ensure a recruiter will add your CV to the pile marked recycle. So with that in mind, here are just a few don’ts.

Surprisingly in this day and age, spelling seems still to be a problem and when spell checkers are readily available it does seem strange that CV’s are still winging their merry way to recruiters littered with errors. It is something that can infuriate a recruiter and whilst I don’t think many can profess to an immaculate spelling mind, it is still essential a CV doesn’t contain mistakes.

Layout is another fundamental problem. For a recruiter, they need a clear and concise theme, they need to grasp the very essence of who you are and what you could bring to their company as briefly and quickly as possible. So a CV that is all over the place will make a recruiter give up. In a way it’s a bit like a story, you want the reader to want to read more, get to the exciting conclusion.

So starting with who you are is a must, then the core elements that make you right for the job, your recent career history, skills and education. You can then expand your work life further on, give more detail before finally getting to the who you are away from work.

Stamping your personality on your CV is a hit and miss affair. You might attract a potential employer with a wacky, colour drenched encyclopaedia of your life and works, but you are also just as likely to put them off. It is better to layout your CV in a ‘traditional’ way, putting main points clearly and leaving that wacky bit for the interests part.

There is also something else recruiters cringe at and that’s the ‘obvious profile’, the kind of waffle that seems to go on for an ice age without actually revealing anything about the candidate. It’s easy to write how driven you are and clutter the surrounding space with metaphors that could have come from the corporate bible on how to say little by saying a lot, but essentially it is copy from a thousand CV’s that every recruiter has seen over and over again.

It almost goes without saying you are a hard worker, that you are honest, that you work until the job is done. When these descriptions are used all the time they become redundant and meaningless and can almost have a negative effect because the recruiter will simply bypass it. In my mind a profile should snap, it should say what you are, what you do, what you want. Yes! What you want! After all you are not blindly staggering to employment, you have a desire to work and you know what you want to achieve.

In essence you are looking to make a recruiter take a second look, a third look, an interview. They want to know what you can do, who you are, will you do the job, will you fit in? Substance, personality and requirement.

Substance – All you are and have done in terms of you career/work history
Personality – Who are you, not just in work but out as well
Requirement – Do you match the recruiters expectations?

The job market can seem a ferocious dog eat dog environment, so don’t you deserve to have an edge?

Daryl Tomlinson

 

Strategies That’ll Make Your Resume Stand Out Online

Strategies That’ll Make Your Resume Stand Out Online

This appeared on the the New Grad Life Blog posted by Angela Astley

Sourcing is a term used for recruiters to find and uncover candidates and recruiters are getting more and more creative with their sourcing techniques. One creative sourcing technique being used today is going to Google or other search engines and putting in search strings filled with keywords and terms to generate resumes from all over the internet.

Since recruiters are getting creative with their sourcing techniques, job seekers should start getting creative with online exposure techniques.

1. Create a career blog

Start a blog that focuses on your career industry and include tips, articles, news, and industry related topics. You don’t have to be a writer to create a blog. You can link to other articles and news about that industry topic and add comments showing your industry knowledge. Also, set up a page on the blog for your resume, where you are highlighting your industry knowledge, experience, and expertise. You can easily set up a blog for free using programs such as blogger.com or wordpress.com

2. Use free document sharing websites

There are a number of free file sharing websites that can help you gain more resume exposure online. Save your document in different forms such as DOC and PDF so your resume shows up under those search terms. Yes, recruiters will search for resumes using words such as pdf, rtf, doc, and cv. You can even save your resume as a powerpoint presentation! Here are few free sites to check out: keepandshare.com, slideshare.net, Google docs

3. Set up a resume web page

A one page website for your resume is great exposure and a great way to link others to your resume. You can add your website url to your resume, to other online profiles, and at the end of your signature in emails and posts. You can find free resume website builders such as: Emurse.com and VisualCV.com.

You can read the rest at this link http://newgradlife.blogspot.co.uk/2010/07/resume-writing-strategies-to-stand-out.html

Do you include a profile statement in your CV?

Do you include a profile statement in your CV?

Profile statement – A few thoughts on the value of including a short summary profile at the top of your CV!

This profile is sometimes called the career summary, personal profile statement, profile statement, resume summary, and summary of qualifications. All refer to profiling your key qualifications for a particular job on your résumé.

The profile sums up your skills and experience, and it can include your career goals. This is a part of your CV that you should certainly tailor to the particular needs of the specific job for which you are applying. These are the headline words that will flag up to a recruiter why you are right for the role.

Essentially, a profile is a very condensed and targeted version of a cover letter. And there are clear benefits to including a good one. It can help you stand out among the hundreds of applications companies receive. Most employers spend only a few seconds looking at your CV, and most of this time is spent looking at the top half of it. So, even if a potential employer reads only your profile (located directly beneath your name and contact information), they will still have a clear idea of how uniquely well fitted you are for the role.

In addition, your profile can include Keywords that will help your application get picked up by the recruiting management software that many companies use now use to screen applications.

Keep your profile concise – between one and four short sentences and you can use bullet points. Focus on the requirements for the job and what you have to offer. Overall, integrate your employment history and skills into the qualifications listed for the job – make sure right at first glance, you look like the best candidate.

Wendy Mason is the The Career Coach – helping you to find fresh perspectives on your Job Search and Career. She helps you work towards your goals and aspirations, in a way that fits in with both work and home life. Email her at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com,  find her on Skype at wendymason14, or call +44 (0) 2081239146 (02081239146 for UK callers) or +1 262 317 9016 if you are in the US.

A free trial/consultation allows you to try phone coaching from the comfort of your own home and without risk. Don’t forget to ask about the Summer Special Offer 

Job Search:Do you include a “profile” in your CV?

Job Search:Do you include a “profile” in your CV?

A few thoughts on the value of including a short summary profile at the top of your CV!

This profile is sometimes called the career summary, personal profile statement, profile statement, resume summary, and summary of qualifications. All refer to profiling your key qualifications for a particular job on your résumé.

The profile sums up your skills and experience, and it can include your career goals. This is a part of your CV that you should certainly tailor to the particular needs of the specific job for which you are applying. These are the headline words that will flag up to a recruiter why you are right for the role.

Essentially, a profile is a very condensed and targeted version of a cover letter. And there are clear benefits to including a good one. It can help you stand out among the hundreds of applications companies receive. Most employers spend only a few seconds looking at your CV, and most of this time is spent looking at the top half of it. So, even if a potential employer reads only your profile (located directly beneath your name and contact information), they will still have a clear idea of how uniquely well fitted you are for the role.

In addition, your profile can include Keywords that will help your application get picked up by the recruiting management software that many companies use now use to screen applications.

Keep your profile concise – between one and four short sentences and you can use bullet points. Focus on the requirements for the job and what you have to offer. Overall, integrate your employment history and skills into the qualifications listed for the job – make sure right at first glance, you look like the best candidate.

Wendy Mason is the The Career Coach – helping you to find fresh perspectives on your Job Search and Career. She helps you work towards your goals and aspirations, in a way that fits in with both work and home life. Email her at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com,  find her on Skype at wendymason14, or call +44 (0) 2081239146 (02081239146 for UK callers) or +1 262 317 9016 if you are in the US.

A free trial/consultation allows you to try phone coaching from the comfort of your own home and without risk. Don’t forget to ask about the Summer Special Offer