Be passionate in your job search

Be passionate in your job search

Job Search:Time To Be Passionate

Advice from Wendy Smith; Career Coach and author of The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book – order on Amazon

Be passionate –  when people talk to me about career development and job search, I tell them they need to be clear about what really matters to them. Lots of people look for roles that show what they think they should want. They don’t consider what they actually enjoy doing. Usually, this has to do with money! It is difficult to be passionate about a job you do just for the money. And being passionate is key to impressing a prospective employer.

Now, let us not be naive, money is important to most of us. But to take a job that meets no other criteria, can be the first step on the road to disaster.

You need to understand what you really care about. And when it comes to interviews, you may well be asked what you are passionate about.

But, you have to be practical. Saying that your passion is for something that is going to mean traveling to the other side of the world for weeks at a time may not get you that job with a local employer.

Be honest. But think about what is going to present you in a reasonable light at your interview. And make sure that you can back up your statement with information about your experience and future intentions.

Do not declare a passion for something you know very little about it. You should be able to talk about your choice with interest and enthusiasm.

Having and showing passion, and the energy associated with it, is attractive. It makes you more interesting to employers and to the world at large. You become a little more charismatic.

So, what is your passion?

Other resources for the job seeker

As a job seeker, there are lots of useful techniques to learn or to refresh. From writing a modern CV to wooing at the interview, you’ll find lots of tips in my handy little pocket book.

be passionate
A concise and practical little workbook. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

A concise and practical little work book. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

Find this and my other books on my Amazon page at this link; http://ow.ly/BRSAL

Remember working with a career coach can really help job search. Get in touch at the Facing a mid-career dilemmaemail address below – I offer a free half hour trial session by phone or Skype.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book your free 30 minute, no obligation, trial coaching session with Wendy Smith now at this Link 

What Is Your Passion?

Job Search – What Is Your Passion?

What is your passion? One of the things that I emphasize to clients who talk to me about career development and job search, is the need to understand yourself and what you need to feel fulfilled. Lots of people look for roles, and indeed take on roles, that meet, not their own needs but what they think they should want. Top of the list of what they think they should want, of course, is usually money.

Now Let us not be naive – money is important to most of us. But to take a job that meets no other criteria, can be the first step on the road to disaster. For example, you are being paid really well, but all your life you have known you loathed the idea of being stuck behind a desk all day.  They offered you this desk-bound job with lots of money attached. And now there you are stuck behind your desk and feeling frustrated every day; your morale is low and so, increasingly, is the quality of your work.

You need to understand what you want and what you don’t want from a job. Though, of course, at the end of day, there may have to be some compromises. You may have to take on something you didn’t really want just to keep a roof over the heads of yourself and your family, but understand what you have done and that will help you to manage the consequences.

It helps, as well, to understand what you really care about in job search when it comes to interviews. You may well be asked what you are passionate about – what really matters to you? This is a great question, if you are well prepared for it. Your answer doesn’t have to be work-related of course, but do make sure it is work compatible. Now, is not the time say that your passion is for something that is going to mean travelling to the other side of the world for weeks at a time, taking you away from your work.

Be honest. but think about what is going to present you in a reasonable light at your interview. And make sure that you can back up your statement with information about your past experience and future intentions. Do not declare a passion for something, really knowing very little about it. You might just be unfortunate enough to be interviewed by someone who shares your declared interest and and sees straight through your pretense.

But having and showing passion, and the energy associated, with it is attractive to a prospective employer. It makes you more interesting not just to them but to the world at large.

So, what is your passion? Need help finding it? Get in touch!

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

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Job Search – What Is Your Passion?

Job Search – What Is Your Passion?

One of the things that I emphasize to clients who talk to me about career development and job search, is the need to understand yourself and what you need to feel fulfilled. Lots of people look for roles, and indeed take on roles, that meet, not their own needs but what they think they should want. Top of the list of what they think they should want, of course, is usually money.

Now Let us not be naive – money is important to most of us. But to take a job that meets no other criteria, can be the first step on the road to disaster. For example, you are being paid really well, but all your life you have known you loathed the idea of being stuck behind a desk all day.  They offered you this desk-bound job with lots of money attached. And now there you are stuck behind your desk and feeling frustrated every day; your morale is low and so, increasingly, is the quality of your work.

You need to understand what you want and what you don’t want from a job. Though, of course, at the end of day, there may have to be some compromises. You may have to take on something you didn’t really want just to keep a roof over the heads of yourself and your family, but understand what you have done and that will help you to manage the consequences.

It helps, as well, to understand what you really care about in job search when it comes to interviews. You may well be asked what you are passionate about – what really matters to you? This is a great question, if you are well prepared for it. Your answer doesn’t have to be work-related of course, but do make sure it is work compatible. Now, is not the time say that your passion is for something that is going to mean travelling to the other side of the world for weeks at a time, taking you away from your work.

Be honest. but think about what is going to present you in a reasonable light at your interview. And make sure that you can back up your statement with information about your past experience and future intentions. Do not declare a passion for something, really knowing very little about it. You might just be unfortunate enough to be interviewed by someone who shares your declared interest and and sees straight through your pretense.

But having and showing passion, and the energy associated, with it is attractive to a prospective employer. It makes you more interesting not just to them but to the world at large.

So, what is your passion?

Wendy Mason is a career coach.  She helps people reach their goals and aspirations, without sacrificing their home and personal life.  Before working as a coach, Wendy had a long career in both the public and private sectors in general management and consultancy as well as spells in HR.  She now divides her time between coaching and writing. You can contact Wendy at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com and find out more at http://wisewolfcoaching.com

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So you think you are a great leader? Well here is a challenge! Part 3!

Arsenal V Manchester United: Football Fans: Ch...
What do they love?

Nothing great in the world has been accomplished without passion. Georg Wilhelm

In my last two  posts, I discussed how I started to think about leaders I’ve worked with and what the good ones had in common.  And that the more I thought, the more their success seemed to mould itself around the answers to a few relatively simple questions.

I thought of six main questions which of course then lead on to a number of subsidiary ones.  I asked the first two main questions on 8th April

Do people know why they are here?

Do you share the thinking?

and the second two on 11th April

What counts with you?

Are your managers up to the challenge?

Here today are the last two questions!

Do you really know what do they care about

Do you know what the people in your team are genuinely passionate about?  When was the last time you saw that spark in the eyes which shows real passion?  It may have had nothing what so ever to do with work.  What about when they are talking about the favourite soccer team.

Do you ever see anything like that when they are talking about work?

Perhaps not but there will be kinds of work,  and things  associated with work, that mean more to them than others.

You need to know those who work closest to you well enough to know what they are interested in! It is then up to them to do the same thing for their own team but you can ask if they have!

If you can, find roles for your team that aligns their work with their interests.

Occasionally, that can mean taking a risk and putting someone in an area where they don’t have much experience. But if performance in another role makes you think they can succeed in the new one, it’s usually worth it!  Their passion will fuel a strong desire to learn and grow. Once they’re up to speed, that passion can become a strong driver of innovation and growth.

Do you trust your people and do they know that?

One of the best things you can do is to let your managers know that you trust them and that you don’t intend to interfere in the day to day management of the organisation.

If they are any good, they will breathe a huge sigh of relief and double their commitment to you and your vision!

If you don’t trust them, you need to sort it out with them or move them out.

You won’t find that passion and commitment to the vision that I talk about above without trust.

Without trust your organisation will not deliver the superb performance that you crave.

Have the honesty to know if the real issues with trust are about you and not them.  If that is so, it is up to you to change yourself before you try to change them

So that is my list.  I’m sure it is by no means exhaustive?  What would you have expected to see?  What would you like to add? It has been quite a journey and I would love to hear from you

Wendy Mason works as a consultant, business coach and blogger. Adept at problem solving, she is a great person to bring in when that one thing you thought was straightforward turns out not to be! If you have a problem talk to Wendy – she can help you – email her at wendymason@wisewolfconsulting.com or ring ++44(0)7867681439