Quotes on Career Success

Quotes on career success

Quotes on Career Success

Quotes on career success to inspire you. Something to think about when you need that extra boost.

Analyzing what you haven’t got as well as what you have is a necessary ingredient of a career. Orison Swett Marden

Communication–the human connection–is the key to personal and career success. Paul J. Meyer

What is the recipe for successful achievement? To my mind there are just four essential ingredients: Choose a career you love, give it the best there is in you, seize your opportunities, and be a member of the team. Benjamin F. Fairless

Any woman who has a career and a family automatically develops something in the way of two personalities, like two sides of a dollar bill, each different in design. Her problem is to keep one from draining the life from the other. Ivy Baker Priest

I’ve yet to be on a campus where most women weren’t worrying about some aspect of combining marriage, children, and a career. I’ve yet to find one where many men were worrying about the same thing. Gloria Steinem

Desire! That’s the one secret of every man’s career. Not education. Not being born with hidden talents. Desire. Bobby Unser

If the career you have chosen has some unexpected inconvenience, console yourself by reflecting that no career is without them. Jane Fonda

To find a career to which you are adapted by nature, and then to work hard at it, is about as near to a formula for success and happiness as the world provides. One of the fortunate aspects of this formula is that, granted the right career has been found, the hard work takes care of itself. Then hard work is not hard work at all. Mark Sullivan

The biggest mistake that you can make is to believe that you are working for somebody else. Job security is gone. The driving force of a career must come from the individual. Remember: Jobs are owned by the company, you own your career! Earl Nightingale

The true measure of a career is to be able to be content, even proud, that you succeeded through your own endeavors without leaving a trail of casualties in your wake. Alan Greenspan

People have an idea that one is in control of a career, a lot more than you really are. You can engineer things to an extent. But you are at the mercy of what comes in across the desk. Gary Oldman

When you are inspired by some great purpose, some extraordinary project, all your thoughts break their bounds. Your mind transcends limitations, your consciousness expands in every direction and you find yourself in a new, great and wonderful world. Dormant forces, faculties and talents become alive, and you discover yourself to be a greater person by far than you ever dreamed yourself to be. Patanjali

The past is not your potential. In any hour you can choose to liberate the future. Marilyn Ferguson

If you follow your bliss, you put yourself on a kind of track, which has been there all the while waiting for you, and the life that you ought to be living is the one you are living. Joseph Campbell

The strongest oak tree of the forest is not the one that is protected from the storm and hidden from the sun. It’s the one that stands in the open where it is compelled to struggle for its existence against the winds and rains and the scorching sun. Napoleon Hill

Keep away from people who try to belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you too can become great. Mark Twain

The decisions you make about your work life are especially important, since most people spend more of their waking lives working than doing anything else. Your choices will affect, not only yourself and those closest to you, but in some way the whole world. Laurence G. Boldt

Talents are common, everyone has them – but rare is the courage to follow our talents where they lead. Anon

There is no security in life, only opportunity. Mark Twain

The people who get on in this world are the people who get up and look for the circumstances they want, and if they can’t find them, make them. George Bernard Shaw

I’m a great believer in luck, and I find that the harder I work, the more I have of it. Thomas Jefferson

I hope these quotes on career success inspire you.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

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Serial Career Changers

Serial Career Changers

History’s Most Famous Serial Career Changers

Serial Career Changers – I thought you would enjoy this entertaining post today. It appeared first on the OnlineCollege.org site at this link  (http://www.onlinecollege.org/2012/10/10/historys-most-famous-serial-career-changers/)

Serial Career Changers – the average worker today will change jobs about seven times over the course of their career, but few will go so far as to change their line of work entirely. Historically, people have been even less inclined to take the risk of a complete career revamp, often working one job their entire lives. But some of history’s boldest and most dynamic figures shared a common willingness to abandon one career after another, either in the search for their true calling or a simple inability to focus their interests on one particular area. Such famous people are proof that there’s no shame in being a perpetual career changer.

  1. LEONARDO DA VINCI:

    The original Renaissance Man, da Vinci was one of the most inquisitive, brilliant humans to ever live and he had a resume to prove it. Engineer, painter, architect, geographer, paleontologist, biologist, zoologist, and writer were all hats he wore during his 67 years of life.

  2. BENJAMIN FRANKLIN:

    Printer. Writer. Book store manager. General store owner. Journalist. Newspaper owner. Inventor. Scientist. Congressman. Ambassador. Ben Franklin never stood still and did more in a dozen different careers than most people could hope to do in one.

  3. HERMAN MELVILLE:

    Both before and after achieving literary success, Melville carved out a number of different careers, trying to make ends meet. He starting working at 18 as a surveyor, served as a hand on a number of whaling vessels, taught school, tried his hand at banking, lectured, and became a customs inspector later in life after being overlooked for a diplomatic post by Abraham Lincoln.

  4. THOMAS JEFFERSON:

    As a wealthy landowner, the line between the third president’s various interests and his career works was a thin one. Nevertheless, besides his career in politics, Jefferson was an accomplished architect (designing the University of Virginia campus), a lawyer, and a magistrate.

  5. VINCENT VAN GOGH:

    His works are so influential and so recognizable it is hard to believe van Gogh really only had about 10 years of life that he devoted to painting before he died. He spent many (often unhappy) years working as an art dealer, a teacher at a boarding school, a minister’s assistant, a bookstore employee, and a missionary before another artist convinced him to go to art school.

  6. WYATT EARP:

    The Old West’s most legendary lawman was not always a peace officer, nor even a man on the right side of the law. Throughout his life, Earp moved from one job to the next, always seeking his fortune. He worked as a farmer, a buffalo hunter, a bet-taker at boxing matches, a race-horse owner, a teamster, a miner, possibly a pimp, and a boxing ref.

  7. MARK TWAIN:

    The famous writer went through several different career shakeups and even a name change in his lifetime. He started out as a typesetter and printer before becoming a riverboat pilot on the Mississippi (where he gained the inspiration for the name Mark Twain). After that came an unsuccessful stint at gold mining, followed by a switch to journalism and ultimately to novelist, speaker, and investor.

  8. JOHN STEINBECK:

    Failure to become a published writer spurred a young Steinbeck to try his hand as a sugar factory worker, a tour guide, a fish hatchery manager, a mill laborer, and a ranch hand. He would also work as a war correspondent in WWII before breaking out as an author.

  9. L. RON HUBBARD:

    Hubbard is notorious for founding the controversial religion of Scientology, but that was just one branch of his winding career path. He started out as a pulp fiction writer, then spent time as a gold prospector in Puerto Rico, a Hollywood screenwriter, an expeditioner in Alaska, a lieutenant in the Navy, an occultist (which probably didn’t pay very well), and a yacht-sitter.

  10. ABRAHAM LINCOLN:

    The man from the log cabin had his share of defeats while trying to break into politics. Before taking up residence on Pennsylvania Avenue, Lincoln was a general store owner, the captain of a state militia, a postmaster, a county surveyor, and a self-taught lawyer with his own practice.

  11. FREDERICK DOUGLAS:

    The definition of a self-made man, Frederick Douglas worked his way up from slavery to careers as an abolitionist, an author, a bank president, an ambassador to the Dominican Republic, a U.S. Marshall, a recorder of deeds in Washington, D.C., consul-general to Haiti, and a house builder.

  12. RAY KROC:

    Kroc’s working life began at the tender age of 15, when he lied about his age in order to gain admittance to the military during World War I. Careers as a piano player, a jazz musician, a paper cup salesman, and a radio DJ that followed didn’t take. It wasn’t until he worked in a restaurant and began a relationship with the McDonald brothers while selling milkshake machines that he found his calling in fast food.

  13. GEORGE W. BUSH:

    Here’s one from the “recent history” file. The eldest son of our 41st president did not have a straight shot to his old man’s seat in the Oval Office. Dubya spent time in Big Oil before and after an unsuccessful run at Congress, then jumped back into politics to serve as a campaign advisor to his dad. After that came a stint as managing partner of the Texas Rangers, then campaign advisor again, and finally he broke through as governor of Texas. It was all politics from there on out, except for that one time he pretended to be a fighter pilot.

  14. HARLAND SANDERS:

    We defy you to name a more famous person in fried chickendom. Before starting KFC, The Colonel bounced around from a railroad worker, to lawyer, to barber, back to railroad worker, to insurance salesman, to Chamber of Commerce secretary, to tire salesman. The first iteration of his fried chicken business came at a gas station he opened at age 40.

    Serial Career Changers -this post appeared originally on the OnlineCollege.org site at this link  (http://www.onlinecollege.org/2012/10/10/historys-most-famous-serial-career-changers/)

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

>

History’s Most Famous Serial Career Changers

History’s Most Famous Serial Career Changers

I thought you would enjoy this entertaining post today. It appeared first on the OnlineCollege.org site at this link  (http://www.onlinecollege.org/2012/10/10/historys-most-famous-serial-career-changers/)

The average worker today will change jobs about seven times over the course of their career, but few will go so far as to change their line of work entirely. Historically, people have been even less inclined to take the risk of a complete career revamp, often working one job their entire lives. But some of history’s boldest and most dynamic figures shared a common willingness to abandon one career after another, either in the search for their true calling or a simple inability to focus their interests on one particular area. Such famous people are proof that there’s no shame in being a perpetual career changer.

  1. LEONARDO DA VINCI:

    The original Renaissance Man, da Vinci was one of the most inquisitive, brilliant humans to ever live and he had a resume to prove it. Engineer, painter, architect, geographer, paleontologist, biologist, zoologist, and writer were all hats he wore during his 67 years of life.

  2. BENJAMIN FRANKLIN:

    Printer. Writer. Book store manager. General store owner. Journalist. Newspaper owner. Inventor. Scientist. Congressman. Ambassador. Ben Franklin never stood still and did more in a dozen different careers than most people could hope to do in one.

  3. HERMAN MELVILLE:

    Both before and after achieving literary success, Melville carved out a number of different careers, trying to make ends meet. He starting working at 18 as a surveyor, served as a hand on a number of whaling vessels, taught school, tried his hand at banking, lectured, and became a customs inspector later in life after being overlooked for a diplomatic post by Abraham Lincoln.

  4. THOMAS JEFFERSON:

    As a wealthy landowner, the line between the third president’s various interests and his career works was a thin one. Nevertheless, besides his career in politics, Jefferson was an accomplished architect (designing the University of Virginia campus), a lawyer, and a magistrate.

  5. VINCENT VAN GOGH:

    His works are so influential and so recognizable it is hard to believe van Gogh really only had about 10 years of life that he devoted to painting before he died. He spent many (often unhappy) years working as an art dealer, a teacher at a boarding school, a minister’s assistant, a bookstore employee, and a missionary before another artist convinced him to go to art school.

  6. WYATT EARP:

    The Old West’s most legendary lawman was not always a peace officer, nor even a man on the right side of the law. Throughout his life, Earp moved from one job to the next, always seeking his fortune. He worked as a farmer, a buffalo hunter, a bet-taker at boxing matches, a race-horse owner, a teamster, a miner, possibly a pimp, and a boxing ref.

  7. MARK TWAIN:

    The famous writer went through several different career shakeups and even a name change in his lifetime. He started out as a typesetter and printer before becoming a riverboat pilot on the Mississippi (where he gained the inspiration for the name Mark Twain). After that came an unsuccessful stint at gold mining, followed by a switch to journalism and ultimately to novelist, speaker, and investor.

  8. JOHN STEINBECK:

    Failure to become a published writer spurred a young Steinbeck to try his hand as a sugar factory worker, a tour guide, a fish hatchery manager, a mill laborer, and a ranch hand. He would also work as a war correspondent in WWII before breaking out as an author.

  9. L. RON HUBBARD:

    Hubbard is notorious for founding the controversial religion of Scientology, but that was just one branch of his winding career path. He started out as a pulp fiction writer, then spent time as a gold prospector in Puerto Rico, a Hollywood screenwriter, an expeditioner in Alaska, a lieutenant in the Navy, an occultist (which probably didn’t pay very well), and a yacht-sitter.

  10. ABRAHAM LINCOLN:

    The man from the log cabin had his share of defeats while trying to break into politics. Before taking up residence on Pennsylvania Avenue, Lincoln was a general store owner, the captain of a state militia, a postmaster, a county surveyor, and a self-taught lawyer with his own practice.

  11. FREDERICK DOUGLAS:

    The definition of a self-made man, Frederick Douglas worked his way up from slavery to careers as an abolitionist, an author, a bank president, an ambassador to the Dominican Republic, a U.S. Marshall, a recorder of deeds in Washington, D.C., consul-general to Haiti, and a house builder.

  12. RAY KROC:

    Kroc’s working life began at the tender age of 15, when he lied about his age in order to gain admittance to the military during World War I. Careers as a piano player, a jazz musician, a paper cup salesman, and a radio DJ that followed didn’t take. It wasn’t until he worked in a restaurant and began a relationship with the McDonald brothers while selling milkshake machines that he found his calling in fast food.

  13. GEORGE W. BUSH:

    Here’s one from the “recent history” file. The eldest son of our 41st president did not have a straight shot to his old man’s seat in the Oval Office. Dubya spent time in Big Oil before and after an unsuccessful run at Congress, then jumped back into politics to serve as a campaign advisor to his dad. After that came a stint as managing partner of the Texas Rangers, then campaign advisor again, and finally he broke through as governor of Texas. It was all politics from there on out, except for that one time he pretended to be a fighter pilot.

  14. HARLAND SANDERS:

    We defy you to name a more famous person in fried chickendom. Before starting KFC, The Colonel bounced around from a railroad worker, to lawyer, to barber, back to railroad worker, to insurance salesman, to Chamber of Commerce secretary, to tire salesman. The first iteration of his fried chicken business came at a gas station he opened at age 40.

    This post appeared originally on the OnlineCollege.org site at this link  (http://www.onlinecollege.org/2012/10/10/historys-most-famous-serial-career-changers/)

  • Wednesday Quotes on Career Success

Wednesday Quotes on Career Success

"Everything begins with an idea." - ...

Wednesday Quotes on Career Success

Analyzing what you haven’t got as well as what you have is a necessary ingredient of a career. Orison Swett Marden

Communication–the human connection–is the key to personal and career success. Paul J. Meyer

What is the recipe for successful achievement? To my mind there are just four essential ingredients: Choose a career you love, give it the best there is in you, seize your opportunities, and be a member of the team. Benjamin F. Fairless

Any woman who has a career and a family automatically develops something in the way of two personalities, like two sides of a dollar bill, each different in design. Her problem is to keep one from draining the life from the other. Ivy Baker Priest

I’ve yet to be on a campus where most women weren’t worrying about some aspect of combining marriage, children, and a career. I’ve yet to find one where many men were worrying about the same thing. Gloria Steinem

Desire! That’s the one secret of every man’s career. Not education. Not being born with hidden talents. Desire. Bobby Unser

If the career you have chosen has some unexpected inconvenience, console yourself by reflecting that no career is without them. Jane Fonda

To find a career to which you are adapted by nature, and then to work hard at it, is about as near to a formula for success and happiness as the world provides. One of the fortunate aspects of this formula is that, granted the right career has been found, the hard work takes care of itself. Then hard work is not hard work at all. Mark Sullivan

The biggest mistake that you can make is to believe that you are working for somebody else. Job security is gone. The driving force of a career must come from the individual. Remember: Jobs are owned by the company, you own your career! Earl Nightingale

The true measure of a career is to be able to be content, even proud, that you succeeded through your own endeavors without leaving a trail of casualties in your wake. Alan Greenspan

People have an idea that one is in control of a career, a lot more than you really are. You can engineer things to an extent. But you are at the mercy of what comes in across the desk. Gary Oldman

When you are inspired by some great purpose, some extraordinary project, all your thoughts break their bounds. Your mind transcends limitations, your consciousness expands in every direction and you find yourself in a new, great and wonderful world. Dormant forces, faculties and talents become alive, and you discover yourself to be a greater person by far than you ever dreamed yourself to be.Patanjali

The past is not your potential. In any hour you can choose to liberate the future. Marilyn Ferguson

If you follow your bliss, you put yourself on a kind of track, which has been there all the while waiting for you, and the life that you ought to be living is the one you are living. Joseph Campbell

The strongest oak tree of the forest is not the one that is protected from the storm and hidden from the sun. It’s the one that stands in the open where it is compelled to struggle for its existence against the winds and rains and the scorching sun. Napoleon Hill

Keep away from people who try to belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you too can become great. Mark Twain

The decisions you make about your work life are especially important, since most people spend more of their waking lives working than doing anything else. Your choices will affect, not only yourself and those closest to you, but in some way the whole world. Laurence G. Boldt

Talents are common, everyone has them – but rare is the courage to follow our talents where they lead. Anon

There is no security in life, only opportunity. Mark Twain

The people who get on in this world are the people who get up and look for the circumstances they want, and if they can’t find them, make them. George Bernard Shaw

I’m a great believer in luck, and I find that the harder I work, the more I have of it. Thomas Jefferson

Wendy Mason is a career coach.  She helps people reach their goals and aspirations, without sacrificing their home and personal life.  Before working as a coach, Wendy had a long career in both the public and private sectors in general management and consultancy as well as spells in HR.  She now divides her time between coaching and writing. You can contact Wendy at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com and find out more at http://wisewolfcoaching.com