Management: 6 Simple Tips For New Managers: A Checklist

Management: 6 Simple Tips For New Managers

All managers have a first day in the job.  And it is never easy!  So here are some tips to help you on your way;

  1. Understand your organization; its rules and culture.  Your team is part of a wider organization and you need to understand that wider context. How do people behave – what are the rules (written and unwritten)?  Spend some time finding out and talk to your HR department about what they expect of you as a manager
  2. Understand the work requirement.  What are you there to do and by when do you have to do it? Be clear about the objectives of your own manager and their expectations of you.  If you don’t have anything written down yet, try to agree a time to do that.  What do your team, and each member of it, think they are there to do?  Does it line up with what the organization needs and the team objectives?
  3. Be consistent – firm but fair.  Don’t have favorites and treat everyone in the same way.  Try to be consistent in how you behave – don’t let your bad mood or your “off day” be reflected in how you behave. If you do it will confuse and de-motivate your team.  Above all reward or penalize the same things over time. Do your team understand the standards set for their work? Does your behavior reflect them?
  4. Kindness goes a very long way – kindness engenders kindness – show and encourage appreciation.   Being kind doesn’t mean you become a “soft” manager that people can take advantage of.  Kindness is an extension of being fair.  Do you treat people as you,  yourself, would like to be treated?  You will be surprised what a difference to your life as a manager it will make when you have your team’s support. Kindness will help gain you that support.
  5. Work on you own confidence – confidence inspires others.  Learn how to look and sound confident even when you don’t feel it.  This will hep your team to feel more secure and able to give their best work.  Do you have a problem maintaining your feelings of confidence? If so work with a coach to learn some techniques to help – my contact details are below.
  6. Learn to make quick and effective decisions – dithering bosses lose the confidence of their teams.  Do you know how to identify relevant information quickly and then to weigh evidence to help you make a decision. Be willing to take risks – making decisions means being prepared sometimes to take a risk.  Giving someone the benefit of the doubt or even delegating effectively requires you to take risks.  Do you understand risk and how to take it? Learn about risk and how evaluate how much of it you are taking and how to manage the consequences.  At the end of the day,  as the manager, you “carry the can” and that is something that good managers learn to live with.

I am sure you will be a first class manager.  It isn’t easy but it can be immensely rewarding.  Good Luck.  If you would like my help, please get in touch

Wendy is the Happiness Coach and author of  The Wolf Project and a new novel, Blood Brothers, to be published in Summer 2013.  As a life and career coach and blogger, she helps people reach their goals and aspirations. As a novelist she hopes to entertain. Oh and she writes poetry too! To find out more email wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com, find her on Skype at wendymason14, or call +44 (0) 2081239146 (02081239146 for UK callers) or +1 262 317 9016 if you are in the US.

A free trial/consultation gives you an opportunity to try phone coaching without risk. Remember there are great benefits to be achieved by being coached in the comfort  of your own home by phone or Skype .

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Management:Some Good Thoughts On Giving Feedback

Management;Some Good Thoughts On Giving Feedback

Wendy Mason is the Happiness Coach and author of a new novel, The Wolf Project.  Wendy is a life and career coach and writer. She is passionate about helping people find happiness at work and at home! To find out more emailwendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com, find her on Skype at wendymason14, or call +44 (0) 2081239146 (02081239146 for UK callers) or +1 262 317 9016 if you are in the US.  
A free trial/consultation allows you to give phone coaching a real trial without any financial risk. And remember there are great benefits to be achieved from coaching by phone or Skype.

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Management – Gregory Smith Speaks On Employee Retention, Talent Management & Leadership

Management – Gregory Smith Speaks On Employee Retention, Talent Management & Leadership

Greg Smith is a “perceptive teacher, an inspirational speaker and a motivating preacher.” From Lieutenant Colonel in the Army, to company president, and the author of six books, Greg’s 27 years of leadership and consulting experience have helped propel him as one of the US’s leading authorities on employee retention, talent management, and leadership. As a business management consultant, he shows executives and business owners how to build their organizations and retain and motivate their workforce.

The video is from the Eagles Talent Speakers Bureau –http://www.eaglestalent.com/Gregory-S…

Wendy Mason is the Happiness Coach and author of a new novel, The Wolf Project.  Wendy is a life and career coach and writer. She is passionate about helping people find happiness at work and at home! To find out more emailwendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com, find her on Skype at wendymason14, or call +44 (0) 2081239146 (02081239146 for UK callers) or +1 262 317 9016 if you are in the US.  

A free trial/consultation allows you to give phone coaching a real trial without any financial risk. And remember there are great benefits to be achieved from coaching by phone or Skype.

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Management; 10 Tips for New Managers

Photo:wikipedia

Management; 10 Tips for New Managers

Must dos for first-time bosses

With the right training and guidance, millennials can lead as well as managers wiser in both years and experience.

I think you will find this post by Jessica Harper on the  U.S. News Money website useful if you are just starting out.

“Who says 20- and early 30-somethings can’t be effective leaders in the workplace? With the right training and guidance, millennials can lead as well as managers wiser in both years and experience. Here are 10 tips for first-time managers who want to excel:

1. Seek a mentor. It’s generally easier to take on a managerial role with a sound support system in place. A little encouragement can yield immense benefits for novice supervisors. “Find a mentor and/or role model,” says Steve Bailey, president of the National Management Association. “Look at others who seem to be effective and happy in their work. Ask them for their advice,” he says. “People appreciate that.

2. Bridge the generational divide. In the current workforce, it’s not uncommon for a millennial to manage a baby boomer. But occasionally, an older worker might be less than thrilled with the idea of being managed by someone who was still in diapers when he or she was well into their first job. Bailey says young supervisors should prep themselves for that struggle. “Of course those conflicts can easily arise,” says Bailey. “And someone needs to tell the younger managers to expect them. More importantly, they need to be coached and taught the importance of emotional intelligence—that ability to read others, to show empathy, to listen, and to respect the experience of others.”

Misconceptions can also deepen the divide….

Read the rest at http://money.usnews.com/money/careers/articles/2012/07/12/10-tips-for-new-managers

Wendy Mason is the Happiness Coach and author of a new novel, The Wolf Project.  Wendy is a life and career coach and writer. She is passionate about helping people find happiness at work and at home! To find out more email wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com, find her on Skype at wendymason14, or call +44 (0) 2081239146 (02081239146 for UK callers) or +1 262 317 9016 if you are in the US.  

A free trial/consultation allows you to give phone coaching a real trial without any financial risk. And remember there are great benefits to be achieved from coaching by phone or Skype.

CV review and interview preparation a speciality

 

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Management – Challenging conversations and how to manage them

Challenging conversations and how to manage them

Today’s post comes from the ACAS website.  Acas (Advisory, Conciliation and Arbitration Service) aims to improve organisations and working life through better employment relations. You can download their brochure at this link pdf  Challenging conversations and how to manage them [302kb] You might find this book useful too Difficult Conversations: How to Discuss What Matters Most

Challenging conversations and how to manage them
Download the Challenging conversations and how to manage them in pdf form [302kb]
“Excuse me! There’s a problem.”

“What’s happened?”

“Where do you want to start?” Take your pick:

  • Simon’s been posting derogatory comments about you on a social networking site
  • Mary failed to get the expected promotion and is very upset
  • Phil is waiting to complain about a colleague making sexist comments in the canteen

Hopefully not a typical Monday morning, but we can all be ambushed by difficult line management issues.

The first question many managers ask themselves is ‘is it my responsibility to sort it out?’

If the answer is ‘yes’ there can still be a real reluctance to get caught up in very emotional or difficult performance and conduct issues.

Get it wrong and the employee may go absent, work less effectively or you may get landed with a grievance.

Get it right and you can improve levels of performance, attendance and employee engagement.

The new Acas guide pdf  Challenging conversations and how to manage them [302kb] and training package will help you to stay in control of whatever situation comes your way.

If you have an urgent issue to deal with and need to get some quick practical advice, the pdf  Challenging conversations – step by step table [45kb] is available.

Watch this video to see how conversations can sometimes go wrong

word  Having difficult conversations transcript [83kb]

Questions and Answers

What is a difficult conversation?

A difficult or challenging conversation is a conversation where you have to manage emotions and information in a sensitive way in order to:

  • Address poor performance or conduct
  • Deal with personal problems
  • Investigate complaints/deal with grievances
  • Comfort or reassure someone – for example, if they are to be made redundant
  • Tackle personality clashes

The conversation usually takes place one-to-one and can really test a line manager’s skills.

Why should I act now?

If you do not act now then you could:

  • mislead the employee by giving the impression that there is no problem
  • deny the employee the chance to improve or put things right
  • damage the productivity and efficiency of your business
  • lower the morale amongst team members

How can I make the conversations more bearable?

You can help make conversations with your employees less difficult by:

  • having a quiet word at the first sign that something is wrong
  • keeping in touch with your staff and the team
  • using employee representatives as sounding boards for how staff are feeling about issues

It is far better to nip problems in the bud, wherever possible, rather than waiting for them to become more entrenched or complicated.

What skills do I need to handle a challenging conversation?

Many of the skills needed to manage difficult conversations and behaviour are often referred to, in a rather derogatory tone, as ‘soft’. But there’s nothing soft about dealing with an emotional or confrontational employee who may appear to be trying to unsettle or undermine you.

In order to manage a difficult conversation you need to think carefully about:

  • the way you communicate
  • your ability to take control of a meeting and
  • your levels of self-belief.

Training can help to give you the confidence you need.

Handling Difficult Conversations – Acas training

This training will show you how to prepare for difficult or crucial conversations, how to manage and control the workplace discussion process and how to ensure you are talking to employees in as productive a way as possible. Acas will improve your confidence and enhance your knowledge and skills for reducing stress, taking action and tackling difficult conversations head on.

View Handling Difficult Conversations course details, dates and locations orenquire online.

Other related Acas training

Discipline and grievance

Conducting investigations

Performance management

Skills for supervisors

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Managing People – Know Yourself!

Managing People – Know Yourself!

Knowing yourself is the beginning of all wisdom. Aristotle

N-Plants

I’ve been writing a lot recently about the personal development mindset.  A key part of the mindset is self-belief.  But before you can believe in yourself, you need to understand yourself; particularly your strengths, your weaknesses and your personality.  This is particularly important if you want to be successful at managing others!

I have important news for you – there are no perfect managers.  Managers have strengths and all of them have weaknesses too.  You are no different to the rest.  There will be things that you are good at and there will be other things that you might prefer not to talk about, or even to admit to yourself.  And every one of us has our own quirks of personality.  Believe me, you need to understand yours!  If you want to succeed as a manager, you need to be honest and, not least, with yourself.

Being a good manager doesn’t mean you need to be perfect or to know everything.  But, you do need to be good at covering the gaps; that only works if you know where the gaps are.  Then you have options.

You can:

  • Put together a team that includes people who are what you are not and can do what you cannot. Sometimes this can be a challenge – often our first instinct is to recruit people just like us! If you are putting together a team for an important, business critical, task,  you need to have all the bases covered,
  • Outsource/buy in the ability you need, when you need it, for example, HR advice when faced with a large-scale organizational change.
  • Adapt the task so that it uses the skills and experience you have available. This may be negotiable more often than you think.  But without an honest appraisal of your own strengths and the strengths of the team, that would not be possible.

If you would like to understand yourself better then “Personality: What makes you the way you are” by Daniel Nettle comes well recommended.  Also, there are lots of free personality tests on line – HumanMetrics provides one of the more widely used ones.

Wendy Mason is the Happiness Coach and author of a new novel, The Wolf Project Wendy is a life and career coach and writer. She is passionate about helping people find happiness at work and at home! She helps people reach their goals and aspirations, without sacrificing their home and personal life.  She believes coaching requires compassion, warmth and empathy. Wendy helps people reach their career goals and aspirations, without sacrificing their home and personal life. You can contact Wendy at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com and find out more at http://wisewolfcoaching.com

Drive and Motivation: The surprising truth about what motivates us

Drive and Motivation: The surprising truth about what motivates us

This entertaining little film has some useful information about motivation.  It is an illustrated adaptation of  Dan Pink’s talk at the RSA. It illustrates the hidden truths behind what really motivates us at home and in the workplace. You can find out more about RSA at www.theRSA.org



Wendy Mason is the Happiness Coach and author of a new novel, The Wolf Project Wendy is a life and career coach and writer. She is passionate about helping people find happiness at work and at home! She helps people reach their goals and aspirations, without sacrificing their home and personal life.  She believes coaching requires compassion, warmth and empathy. Wendy helps people reach their career goals and aspirations, without sacrificing their home and personal life. You can contact Wendy at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com and find out more at http://wisewolfcoaching.com

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People at work – how to deal with difficult people – stay neutral!

People at work – how to deal with difficult people – stay neutral!

We all meet difficult people at work and in our private lives.  Dealing with difficult people is a subject that seems to generate more interest than anything else, here and at my other blog, WiseWolf’s Your Happiness Factor.  So I’m making no apologies for posting about this again.

Difficult people can do more than make us unhappy.  As if that isn’t bad enough, difficult people can be bad for your health.  If you let them stress you out, that can lead to physical and the psychological problems.

If we meet difficult people in the workplace and they are work colleagues, the stress is on-going.  Even if you are the manager of a difficult person, it can take a toll.  And, if the “difficult person” is your boss, the stress can be almost intolerable. I’m not talking here about a bullying boss; just someone who is difficult to work with.

This video discusses how it is important to stay calm, stay in a neutral space and stay assertive. Try not to let them engage your emotions – you can use visualization to help do this. Accept that all you can control is how you react.

And, yes, it often helps to work with a coach.

You might find this  other post about learning from difficult people useful too.

This video from http://www.howdini.com/howdini-video-… Mary Bolster, editor of Natural Health Magazine, has some excellent reminders to help you deal with the difficult people in your life.

Wendy Mason is the Happiness Coach and author of a new novel, The Wolf Project Wendy is a life and career coach and writer. She is passionate about helping people find happiness at work and at home! She helps people reach their goals and aspirations, without sacrificing their home and personal life.  She believes coaching requires compassion, warmth and empathy. Wendy helps people reach their career goals and aspirations, without sacrificing their home and personal life. You can contact Wendy at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com and find out more at http://wisewolfcoaching.com

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Thoughts for managers – learning from difficult people!

Thoughts for managers – learning from difficult people!

Counselor and trainer Susan Fee shares three lessons difficult people can teach us.

As managers, we need to think about what we can learn from those we manage.  But we still have to be very practical and make sure that we reconcile caring for the needs of the team, and meeting their needs, with meeting the aims of the organization.  That reconciliation is at the heart of what we do as managers.

Wendy Mason is the Happiness Coach and author of a new novel, The Wolf Project.  Wendy is a life and career coach and writer. She is passionate about helping people find happiness at work and at home! She helps people reach their goals and aspirations, without sacrificing their home and personal life.  She believes coaching requires compassion, warmth and empathy. Wendy helps people reach their career goals and aspirations, without sacrificing their home and personal life. You can contact Wendy at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com and find out more at http://wisewolfcoaching.com

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Just Promoted? Here’s what you need to know.

Just Promoted? Here’s what you need to know.

Advice from Wally Bock

Wally Bock writes about leadership and management based on many years of hard won experience.  He also a ghostwriter and coaches writers and produces information products.  This is not a new post but I think it is a very valuable one. You can follow him on Twitter as @Wally Bock  and here is the link to his blog http://blog.threestarleadership.com

A great cloud of jargon, debate, and junk theory surrounds the idea of leadership, what it is, who does it, and how to do it well. But if you have just been promoted, and you’re responsible for a group for the first time, there are only a few things you really need to know about leadership.

When you get promoted and become responsible for the performance of a group you become a leader. But you don’t undergo some magical change. In fact, it will probably take you over a year to completely adjust to your new role.

You’re a leader because the people in your group treat you like one. The only choice you have is what kind of leadership job you’ll do.

When you become a leader your power actually goes down. As an individual contributor, you just have to decide to work harder, longer or smarter to improve performance. When you’re responsible for the performance of a group, the group is your destiny. They choose whether to act or not.

When you become a leader, your influence goes up. The people who work for you pay attention to what you say and do. They adjust their behavior accordingly.

The result is that you use your behavior (what you say and do) to influence the behavior of the people who work for you to achieve a defined objective.

Achieving the objective is part of your job as a leader. But it’s only part.

The other part is caring for your people. It may be possible to achieve good short term results without caring for your people. But you can’t achieve long term success for you or your company without the willing cooperation of the best people you can find.

Boss’s Bottom Line

At the end of the day, you will know if you’ve done a good job as a leader if you can answer “Yes” to the following two questions.

Did we accomplish the mission?

Are the members of my group better off today than yesterday?

You can find this post and other wise advice for Wally at  http://blog.threestarleadership.com/2010/03/23/just-promoted-heres-what-you-need-to-know.aspx