Job Search: References and Recommendations on Social Media Sites

Social Media and Job Search

Social Media and Job Search -References and Recommendations on Social Media Sites

Social Media and Job Search – I’ve just found an interesting post from Susan Heathfield on About.com discussing the status of social media references. Susan Heathfield is a leading and highly respected Human Resources expert.

As she says, on-line social media sites like LinkedIn can present job reference challenges for employers. Employee job references, provided by an employee on a social media site, are not an official company reference for purposes of background checking and employment.

That leaves an employer to decide whether to take social media job references into account when considering a candidate. IN Susan’s view, sometimes they should but, as with anything to do with the on-line world of social media, the devil is in the details.

You can read her very good post at this link http://humanresources.about.com/od/selectemployees/qt/job-references.htm

Other resources to help your job search

In the job market, there are always lots of useful techniques to learn or to refresh. From writing a modern CV to wooing at the interview, you’ll find lots of tips in my handy little pocket book.

Stand Out At Interview
A concise and practical little workbook. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

A concise and practical little work book. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

Find this and my other books on my Amazon page at this link; http://ow.ly/BRSAL

Remember working with a career coach can really help career resilience. Get in touch at the Facing a mid-career dilemmaemail address below – I offer a free half hour trial session by phone or Skype.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book your free 30 minute, no obligation, trial coaching session with Wendy Smith now at this Link 

Solve Problems at Work Quickly and Efficiently by Using Online Forums and Communities

Solve Problems at Work Quickly and Efficiently by Using Online Forums and Communities

Today we have another guest post from Tamara M. Williams who writes career articles based on her personal and work experience. She shares tips so that readers can take the necessary steps to develop their careers further She also writes articles for EzineArticles and Squidoo on topics such as Technology, Marketing and Entertainment.

There are some days when you try to solve a problem, but still come up short. Online research is usually the best method to try in order to demonstrate your initiative in solving various problems. Yet not all solutions are readily available on Google. Instead, these problems will sometimes cause you to search multiple pages, only to become frustrated with the endless results of irrelevant information. Hence, joining various online forums and communities to learn from and ask question to will help you to solve problems quickly and more efficiently.

Imagine your typical workday when a problem arises. You search Google to no avail so you take the next logical step, which would be to ask colleagues or your supervisor for ideas. You could also ask them to provide a suggestion on where to look for past projects that had similar issues. In addition, trying a brainstorm session may work since multiple persons are contributing and revising ideas. Sometimes this works, but sometimes the problems are far more complicated.

That is why further research should be conducted and various ideas discussed within relevant online forums or communities. The typical places to look are on LinkedIn, Facebook, and Google+. Just search using keywords until you come across the most appropriate group to join.

You can also dig a bit deeper by going to forums hosted by your professional associates or popular industry websites. These forums have numerous experts in the field that are available throughout the day. Members post a variety of issues far more frequently that in regular social media communities. Search these forums using a variety of keywords and test the suggested solutions to determine if one will work for you. You will also have the chance to offer assistance to others who are having difficulty solving problems that you have already faced and resolved. This will help you to build a network of experts to contact in your field.

By taking advantage of the wealth of knowledge and online presence of members in these mediums, you are able to get higher quality information and solutions more quickly. This will reduce your frustration since less time is spent on problem solving and now you can easily move on to the next phase of your project.

About the Author

Tamara M. Williams writes career articles based on her personal and work experience. She shares tips so that readers can take the necessary steps to develop their careers further. She also writes articles for EzineArticles and Squidoo on topics such as Technology, Marketing and Entertainment.

Also by Tamara

Career Success:Assess Your Work Expenses Every Month to Ensure That You Live Within Your Budget

Productivity Tip: Improve Your Productivity at Work by Keeping Notes for Every Project You Work on

 

Low Job Search Periods

Low Job Search Periods

Job Search at Holiday Time

By Wendy Mason Career Coach and Life Coach►helping you find fresh perspectives on life and your career

Low Job Search Periods! Regular job hunters and those in the recruitment industry recognise two periods when there can be something of a lull in the job market. One is during the summer holiday period and the other is from the beginning of December until mid-January.

Yes, it gets tougher but this isn’t the time to take your eye off the ball. There are likely to be some opportunities around and who knows who you might meet over the Christmas period and what opportunities they may know about.

Having said that though, this might by the time to review and update your CV. Always think about what the recruiter wants to find out – and give it to them, clearly and near the beginning of your CV. Most recruiters scan CVs very quickly and what you say at the top of the first page is all important.

This might be the time as well to further explore social networking. How much do you know about using

lPhoto credit: Inmobiliaria Lares, Cangas)

Twitter and Facebook and are you fully exploiting the possibilities of LinkedIn? Advertising jobs is costly to companies, so many recruit through social media. That makes joining the big three (LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook) lots of sense. Make sure you keep any dodgy Facebook pictures private, though.

Why not showcase your capabilities on line as well. Now might be the time to write some guest posts. Lots of blog owners (including me) welcome a well written article at any time of the year. I’m always on the lookout for 300 to 500 words on leadership, management, job search or career development. Guest bloggers take the burden off me to produce good content several times a week.

Take part in LinkedIn discussions too. They will continue over the Christmas period. Show people just what you have to contribute.

(Photo credit: Wikipedia)

And don’t forget about chatting to recruiters informally and keeping up to date with their companies. That is a great way to find out about jobs before anyone else. Get on Twitter or LinkedIn and connect with them; make sure you wish them the compliments of the season, too. You have nothing to lose and you may have plenty to gain.

I wish all those starting out on, or a continuing, a job search this week every success and if I can help, please get in touch.

Remember I offer a trial free half hour coaching session by phone or Skype.

Warm regards

Wendy
wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com
http://wisewolfcoaching.com

  • Job Search: Make sure you include your personal profile/summary in your CV
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Job Search at Holiday Time

Job Search at Holiday Time

Advice from Wendy Smith. Wendy is a Career and Life Coach helping you find fresh perspectives on life and your career.  You can book a FREE coaching session or find out more at this link

Job Search at holiday time – regular job hunters and those in the recruitment industry recognise two periods when there can be something of a lull in the job market. One is during the summer holiday period and the other is from the beginning of December until mid-January.

Yes, it gets tougher but this isn’t the time to take your eye off the ball. There are likely to be some opportunities around and who knows who you might meet over the Christmas period and what opportunities they may know about.

Having said that though, this might by the time to review and update your CV. Always think about what the recruiter wants to find out – and give it to them, clearly and near the beginning of your CV. Most recruiters scan CVs very quickly and what you say at the top of the first page is all important.

This might be the time as well to further explore social networking. How much do you know about using

lPhoto credit: Inmobiliaria Lares, Cangas)

Twitter and Facebook and are you fully exploiting the possibilities of LinkedIn? Advertising jobs is costly to companies, so many recruit through social media. That makes joining the big three (LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook) lots of sense. Make sure you keep any dodgy Facebook pictures private, though.

Why not showcase your capabilities on line as well. Now might be the time to write some guest posts. Lots of blog owners (including me) welcome a well written article at any time of the year. I’m always on the lookout for 300 to 500 words on leadership, management, job search or career development. Guest bloggers take the burden off me to produce good content several times a week.

Take part in LinkedIn discussions too. They will continue over the Christmas period. Show people just what you have to contribute.

(Photo credit: Wikipedia)

And don’t forget about chatting to recruiters informally and keeping up to date with their companies. That is a great way to find out about jobs before anyone else. Get on Twitter or LinkedIn and connect with them; make sure you wish them the compliments of the season, too. You have nothing to lose and you may have plenty to gain.

I wish all those starting out on, or a continuing, a job search this week every success and if I can help, please get in touch.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in helping people lead happier lives and feel more fulfilled. She has worked in management as well as coaching and personal development, as well as starting up her own businesses. That means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up a new business or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book a FREE coaching session with Wendy or find out more at this link

 

Follow Companies on Popular Social Media Sites to Keep Up to Date in Your Industry

Follow Companies on Popular Social Media Sites to Keep Up to Date in Your Industry

Today we have an article from Tamara M. Williams who loves learning about Career Development. She shares her knowledge and experiences in her articles. She also posts articles on other topics so visit her EzineArticles’ profile to learn more.

In order to grow in your career you should try to keep abreast of your industry. While this might seem like you need to visit every site you should just stick with the ones that bring varied content. A lot of companies have LinkedIn, Google+ and many other social media profiles. If you want to take advantage of the information that they share then just follow them on these sites to learn more about them. Each site offers simple ways to find your target companies. Use these methods so that you are always on the forefront of the latest happenings.

The first step is to determine which career you will be focusing on, companies that you want to work for and those that are in the same industry. Then the second step is to visit their website. On each website, look for their social media buttons and follow them. This means that when they post new information you will see them on your social media homepage. Using a mixture of social media sites also allows you access to various media content that will make the information a richer and deeper experience.

LinkedIn

First, visit LinkedIn and find the Search bar at the top of the page. Since you want to connect with various companies then start typing the names of one that you already know of. When the results show up, look under the Companies headings in the search results and click the company name. You will be taken to the Company’s Profile page. Select the Follow button at the top. You can view the other tabs for Career, and Products and Insights. Now that you are a follower, you will receive updates on your home page when there are job openings, news on products and services, and other great pieces of information. You can also find out if anyone in your network works at the company and can connect with them if you wish to. Next look at the right columns for the headings: “Persons also viewed” to see a list of similar companies. Go ahead and follow those as well. The more companies you connect with the more you will learn about each company and their respective industries.

Google+

Apart from LinkedIn, companies also have a Goole+ Profile. So after you have a list of companies that you wish to follow then navigate to Google+. Again look for the Search bar at the top and start typing the name of the company. Select the company name and once you are on their profile page then look for the Follow button. You can add them to a specific group if you wish. You can view the other tabs for Posts, Photos and YouTube if you want to get more information. In Google+, they share a lot more images and videos so gathering information is fun. You can also find out who are in their Circles if you wish to follow those persons and companies as well. Once you get back to your Google+ homepage then you will see the latest posts made from all the companies that you follow. Of course, you can return to a specific company whenever to want to get more details.

LinkedIn and Google+ are just a few ways to follow companies of interest and stay updated on the latest careers, products and services and other insights being shared. Using these social media networks to boost your career development is easy since you get all the updates on your homepage. This saves you the trouble of going to each company’s website or profile page when you need the latest information. Of course, still feel free to visit their websites because you get more detailed information there.

About the Author:
Tamara M. Williams loves learning about Career Development. She shares her knowledge and experiences in her articles. She also posts articles on other topics so visit her EzineArticles’ profile to learn more.

Find related articles at
http://ezinearticles.com/?expert=Tamara_M._Williams

Using Social Media for Job Search

Using Social Media for Job Search

Using social media – we all know by now that networking is one of the most important parts of job search. But not all of us are confident about using social media. This is a pity because social media sites will play an increasing role in networking, career advancement, and professional success in the future. If you are a reluctant user of social networking, I hope these tips will help.

Remember that most, if not everything, you do on-line stays there forever. And most can probably be found fairly easily by a potential employer.  So make sure everything you do and write on-line is compatible with the image you want potential employers to see.

Using Social Media – Sites to Consider

LinkedIn

Join LinkedIn if you have not already done so.  Have a look at the profiles of leaders in your professional field and the approach they have taken.  Fill out your profile with an eye to recording your achievements and making yourself an attractive job prospect. Find friends and former colleagues to connect with and join groups that represent you professional interest. You can join up to 50 groups and you can connect with other group members. Take part in group discussions to show your expertise. Update your status with useful links and information for others – become a resource. Do not head up your profile with “looking for work.” But use keywords related to the kind of work you are looking for in your profile. This will attract recruiters.

Facebook

More and more people every day seem to be using Facebook for professional networking. Although personally I have some reservations about its suitability.  Do not mix social and professional networking on Facebook. Use the security features on Facebook with great care. And choose your Friends wisely. Remember your Friends can usually see information about your other Friends in your Profile. Be careful about amount and type of information that you share.  Make sure you post only what you want business contacts or prospective employers to see. And post content relevant to your job search or career. Again, you can demonstrate your expertise.  Facebook can showcase you in the round for a potential employer. That, properly managed, is positive.

Twitter

Twitter is what is known as a microblogging service. You can, and people do, write messages to change the world in 140 characters. Twitter is open-ended and people. And companies use it in a variety of ways, including recruitment. But in 140 characters or less, it’s tough to apply for a job! However, you can tell colleagues and employers that you are looking. Find contacts and recruiters on Twitter. The begin to follow them to see new opportunities.  Follow companies and organizations that you would like to work for. And then find out what they are up to.  Post useful links and information as well as interactingwith others. Twitter is all about conversations, not broadcasting! You can find me on Twitter as @WWisewolf

Using social media can help you to create your professional brand and build your on-line presence strategically  to help with your job searching and career.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

Job Search: Asking For A Job Referral

Job Search: Asking For A Job Referral

When you are interested in a job and someone refers you, you can mention that asking for a job referralin your covering letter.  It will mean you start ahead of the field.  Having a referral is having a recommendation.

When you identify a job you wish to apply for check your network for contacts with the right connections. LinkedIn is great for this. And, if you can find someone who already works for the company you wish to apply to that is great.

As well as LinkedIn, you can also use tools like BranchOut which is a Facebook app. It helps you find your friends at companies you are interested in. Search by company name and you’ll see a list of your Facebook friends at the company. Then, you can approach them to  see if they are willing to help.

You can approach contacts in a number of ways

  • An old-fashioned letter,
  • an email message,
  • Sending a message on a networking site like LinkedIn or Facebook or by, for example, Skype.

It is usually better to ask in writing rather than by phone. That means your contact has time to think about your request and how they can refer you. It is fair to give them the opportunity to refuse. And that is easier to do in writing

When you ask someone to refer you, you are not asking for a reference letter.  But, they do need to know something about you to refer with confidence.  You can ask “Do you feel you know my work well enough to refer me for a job at your company?” Or, “Do you feel you could give me a referral?” That way, they have an out if they don’t feel comfortable. And, you can be assured that those who do refer you will be enthusiastic about your performance. They will write a positive letter or give you a strong endorsement.

You could always offer to provide an updated copy of your resume and information on your skills and experiences. This is so your contact has the right information to work with.

Don’t take it personally if your contact says no!

Don’t take it personally if your contact says no. There could be all kinds of reasons for their refusal and lots that have nothing to do with you.

But don’t feel diffident about making your request. People usually feel flattered to be asked. And if you are asked to make a referral, do your best to help. Though, don’t duck away from refusing if you don’t feel comfortable. Perhaps, you know the person they want to contact will not welcome the approach.

Remember, job search is about giving as well as getting, Build your network with generosity to others. That way you are likely to be remembered with kindness when you need help.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

How to network to find a job!

How to network to find a job!

How to network – job search networking is all about making connections with people. The people you want to contact are those who can either let you know about potential job openings or connect you with others who can tell you.

Networking means talking to everyone you know. This includes family, friends, neighbours, acquaintances, previous employers and colleagues, people you play sport with, local business people, the family solicitor or accountant—everyone. It doesn’t matter if you don’t know very many people. The people you do know might in turn know other people who have heard about a job opening.

Job search networking can be done at different levels. It can be a matter of having casual conversations with people you meet. Or you can make it an active and strategic campaign to contact people for ideas, suggestions and information.

Don’t be afraid to ask for help. People are usually happy to help if they can. You have nothing to lose by phoning or meeting with your contacts. If you don’t make the connection, you won’t be able to tell if the person has good information or knows about an upcoming job. If you do speak with them, you might just land that job, or hear about another that suits you better.

At worst you might feel a bit uncomfortable. But, being prepared will make the discussions easier.

How to Prepare For Job Search Networking

Make a list of all the people you know.

They don’t need to be friends, or even acquaintances; you just need to have enough of a common link with them to initiate a conversation. If you can pick up the phone and call them, for any reason, they are potential networking contacts.

Prepare what you are going to say

You don’t want to just ring people up and say, ‘I work in HR. Do you know of any jobs going?’ Before you phone anyone, note down the specific details of what you’re looking for and exactly the kind of help you think they might be able to give you. For example, say:
‘I’m looking for a role in training and development within the public sector or a not-for-profit organisation. [Government department] or [organisation name] would be the kind of place I’d like to work in. Would you know of any places, maybe smaller and more local, that might be looking for trainers?’

Contact the people on your list in a systematic way

Set yourself a goal—maybe you’re happy to spend all afternoon on the phone to people, and cross twenty off your list. Or maybe you just want to work through the list steadily, making three calls a day. If you find yourself losing enthusiasm, being less conversational and speaking more mechanically, it might be time to take a break.

Ask them for job leads

To make it easy for people to help you, ask them if they have any tips, leads or suggestions. Ask them if they know of any vacancies at all for a person with your skills. If they don’t, ask them to keep you in mind in case anything comes up. Most importantly, ask them if they can suggest anyone else you contact. Do they know someone else who might know about the kinds of jobs that you’re after? Do they know anyone who works for this or that company that you’re interested in joining? If they can refer you to others, contact those other people and ask them the same questions.

Follow up contacts

Often people will tell you, ‘I’ll ask around and see what I can find out for you.’ Sometimes they do ask around; sometimes they forget almost immediately, or a crisis happens at work and they haven’t the time. If you don’t hear from them within a week or so, call them back to see if they’ve managed to find anything out.
Sometimes it seems as if no one will do anything for you or ask around on your behalf. It can be frustrating, but you should stay very polite and pleasant in your dealings with your contacts. After all, you’re asking them for a favour.

Follow up leads

After your initial networking efforts and research, you’ll probably have a long list of new people to try and make connections with. A phone call may be enough, or you might want to arrange a meeting with them to introduce yourself and ask them more specific questions about their company or industry.

Networking wisdom

• Whenever you meet someone new, exchange business cards with them (or at least get one from your new contact, so you can send them your details).
• Show your appreciation for the help you receive by sending a thank-you note, or by telling your contact how their information helped you, even if it only led indirectly to a job prospect.
• Think laterally about where to find network contacts. You can find people to add to your network almost anywhere.
• Get involved in a civic, social, religious or sporting organisation that interests you. As you meet new people in the organisation, they can become new network contacts.
• Join a professional organisation related to your field. The meetings or related events are good opportunities for you to network with people in your field.
• Think about online networking, in forums and in chat rooms.
• Record and organise all your network contacts—for example, on a spreadsheet or index cards. Write down what you found out from them, and any follow-up you should do. This will help you organise your time and monitor your progress.

Keep networking

Even after you’ve found a job, keep networking. Networking isn’t just for getting a job; it can help you do your job better, and it’s a way of being part of your community and society.

Life is full of surprises. You never know when you might need your network contacts’ help in another job search.

Social networking

Social networking sites, such as LinkedIn and Twitter, are becoming increasingly important tools for both job seekers and employers. Learn how to use them – if you would like some help I can recommend a first rate social networking trainer

With thanks to Australia’s Myfuture website

Wendy Mason is the The Career Coach – helping you to find fresh perspectives on your Job Search and Career. She helps you work towards your goals and aspirations, in a way that fits in with both work and home life. Email her at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com,  find her on Skype at wendymason14, or call +44 (0) 2081239146 (02081239146 for UK callers) or +1 262 317 9016 if you are in the US.

A free trial/consultation allows you to try phone coaching from the comfort of your own home and without risk. Don’t forget to ask about the Summer Special Offer 

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Looking Professional

Looking Professional

Job Search – Minding the Brand – Not Your Holiday Photo Please

Looking professional! So there I was sending out invitations to various contacts and I hit on one name I hadn’t seen for a while. It was a former colleague, so off I went to look at her profile to see what she’d been doing recently and there it was, that same old photo.

Well, you might say, be fair, there is a certain very flattering photo of you that has been on one website for a very long time. Yes, that is true.  But that isn’t her problem; my old chum has chosen to put on her professional profile, a not very flattering photo taken on holiday. True,  now she isn’t looking for work and,  for her, good old LI is just a way of keeping in touch with people. But suppose that were to change?

Now, she isn’t the only one.  I know others who have non-holiday and posed photos on their profile. But they still do not look at their best.  Some seem to have been taken with the giggles and others seem to think that looking professional equates to looking grim.

I’m not sure why they have not worked out that looking professional means looking like someone you would want to work with or do business with.

On top of that, remember, that these days potential employers may search social media for more information about you.  Those photos you are tagged in that were taken on the “stag” or “hen” in Benidorm are not going to work to your advantage.

So,  why not carry out an internet search on your name and check that what comes up promotes your professional brand.  Anything that doesn’t  see if you can delete it, or at least, remove the tags!

And in future guard pictures of you that appear on-line quite carefully – you never know what potential employer may be watching. Don’t let your photo “mistakes” come back to haunt you.

In job search and career development you are the brand – it is up to you to protect yourself. Looking professional really matters.

Wendy is the The Career Coach – helping you to find fresh perspectives on your Job Search and Career. She helps you work towards your goals and aspirations, in a way that fits in with both work and home life. Email her at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com,  find her on Skype at wendymason14, or call +44 (0) 2081239146 (02081239146 for UK callers) or +1 262 317 9016 if you are in the US.

A free trial/consultation allows you to try phone coaching from the comfort of your own home and without risk. Don’t forget to ask about the Summer Special Offer 
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Using LinkedIn for Job Search

Using LinkedIn for Job Search

Job Search: How to find a new job using LinkedIn!

Using LinkedIn for Job Search – LinkedIn is a powerful business networking tool but it can also be one of the best ways to find a new job.

Unfortunately, not many people know how to really tap into its power.  But this little video gives simple but useful tips for how you can use your LinkedIn network to search for a new job.

It is from http://www.explania.com/en/channels/work/detail/how-to-find-a-new-job-using-linkedin

If there is advice you would like or if you have questions about your job search, please get in touch!

Wendy Mason is the Happiness Coach and author of a new novel, The Wolf Project Wendy is a life and career coach and writer. She is passionate about helping people find happiness at work and at home! She helps people reach their goals and aspirations, without sacrificing their home and personal life.  She believes coaching requires compassion, warmth and empathy. Wendy helps people reach their career goals and aspirations, without sacrificing their home and personal life. You can contact Wendy at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com and find out more at http://wisewolfcoaching.com

CV review and interview preparation a speciality

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