Corporate Culture 101: What You Need to Get Started: SERIES PART 2: People Skills

Corporate Culture 101

Today we have the second post in a two-part series from our regular contributor, Lindsey Harper Mac. Lindsey is a professional writer living in the Indianapolis area. She specializes in writing guest posts on social media and education. Currently, Lindsey is completing work on her master’s degree. You can find links to Part 1 and some of her earlier posts at the end of the article

Corporate Culture 101: What You Need to Get Started: SERIES PART 2: People Skills

In Part I of this series, the importance of self-management in the form of an accurate, reliable and engaging LinkedIn profile was emphasized as one of the most important and early tasks for a business management degree graduate to complete. Granted, a LinkedIn profile is never complete and should always be a work in progress, documenting an individual’s accomplishments, new skills or additional education. As a test of self-discipline, however, it serves to delineate the difference between a recent graduate and an experienced job searcher with the added advantage of having today’s most popular means of career promotion initially completed. Now, in Part 2 of this series, the topic turns to the so-called soft skills necessary to retain employment.

Emotional Intelligence

The term “soft skills” is public parlance for the psychological term emotional intelligence. It refers to “the ability of an individual to identify, assess and control the emotions of oneself, others and groups.” Like self-management skills, soft skills are expected to grow with an individual’s maturity level and social experiences. The unfortunately label of “soft” makes it sound as though these particular skills are optional in the workplace, easy to learn and practice and have more to do with “warm and fuzzy” than with the bottom line. Nothing could be further from the truth. Emotional intelligence is necessary to ensure communication, cooperation and collective goals—all absolutely imperative for a business to be successful and grow. Indeed, soft skills may be more difficult to learn, practice and perfect, as there are fewer functional workplace examples to serve as mentors.

Hard Facts About Soft Skills

An online article by Nick Shultz reported that the lack of soft communication skills was so great that many companies had difficulty just finding individuals capable of answering their telephones. A consulting firm cited that over 600,000 jobs in manufacturing went unfilled in 2011 due to a lack of skills. Further investigation as to what these highly technical skills must be, revealed them to be soft skills. “In Manpower’s annual Group “2012 Talent Shortage Survey, nearly 20% of employers cited a lack of soft skills as a key reason they couldn’t hire needed employees.” Among the soft skills specifically identified by Shultz as lacking are:

  • Interpersonal skills
  • Motivation
  • Enthusiasm
  • Professionalism
  • Work Ethic
  • Reliability
  • Punctuality.

Why People Really Get Hired

We’ve all heard stories of a less qualified person being hired over someone with the exact experiences and education listed in the job ad. The truth is, interviewers and hiring managers sometimes offer jobs to applicants who they personally like and with whom they feel comfortable. An individual job seeker’s assessed ability to fit in with the corporate culture is also a strong indicator that a job might be tendered.

Finally, hiring managers look for specific traits demonstrated by LinkedIn profiles, employment history or the job seeker’s deportment. These traits include attitude, reliability, attitude, potential, know-how, past performance, work ethic, team skills, humility and lastly, tech ability.

“You’re Hired!”

It seems that a job seeker’s best chance of being offered a position with a particular company would be to fit into the overall company culture and demonstrate good old-fashioned work values. Lastly, they should be able to answer a telephone and turn on a computer.

About the author: Lindsey Harper Mac is a professional writer living in the Indianapolis area. She specializes in writing guest posts on social media and education. Currently, Lindsey is completing work on her master’s degree.

Also by Lindsey Harper Mac;

Career Development: Corporate Culture 101: What You Need to Get Started SERIES Part 1: Self-Management Skills

Leadership in the Medical Field: Series Part 2—How Is It Demonstrated?

Leadership in the Medical Field: Series Part 1—What It Is & Why It’s Critical

Career Development Part 1 – Why Get An Advanced Degree? The Answer is Obvious

Career Development Part 2: Want a Promotion? Focus on Factors Within your Control

Career Development Part 3: Performance Reviews: Painful or Helpful?

LinkedIn Profile for New Graduates

LinkedIn Profile for New Graduates

Today we have the first post in a two-part series from our regular contributor, Lindsey Harper Mac. Lindsey is a professional writer living in the Indianapolis area. She specializes in writing guest posts on social media and education. Currently, Lindsey is completing work on her master’s degree. You can find links to some of her earlier posts at the end of the article.

Career Development: Corporate Culture 101: What You Need to Get Started SERIES Part 1: Self-Management Skills

After Graduation

LinkedIn Profile – As the final strains of Pomp and Circumstance fade away and almost before the ink is dry on a graduate’s new business management degree, the smartest new graduate will seek to become the most appropriate new hire. Having studied business for the requisite amount of time to have earned the degree in business, the following recommendations should not come as a surprise. However, given the excitement of the occasion, it may be reasonable to repeat some of the basics of what should come next.

New graduates will need to update and perfect their LinkedIn profiles so that they have the best opportunity to connect with a job most appropriate to their education, skills and personalities. This is the most tangible of self-management skills that can collectively be considered exercises in self-discipline. Next, new graduates—preferably new employees at this time—need to learn and master the so-called “soft skills. The specifics of soft skills and how to learn, practice and implement them will be addressed in Part 2 of this series.

Crafting Your LinkedIn Profile

With the increasing reliance that corporate recruiters place on LinkedIn profiles, it is imperative that job seekers correctly and honestly identify their skills, abilities and personalities in order to have the best chance of obtaining a position that is the closest fit. Utilizing the correct adjectives can give a recruiter a better sense of a job seeker’s personality, her degree of self-awareness (or lack thereof), and how narrowly she has defined her appropriate field of employment. Keywords are important and can be very helpful for job seekers for the period of time they are accepted by recruiters. Curiously, however, they have a definite shelf life beyond which use of a particular term or keyword is considered an overused buzzword and becomes detrimental to the user.

Terms to Utilize in Your LinkedIn Profile

The ultimate goal of a new graduate’s LinkedIn profile is to garner a position that is appropriate to her skills, education, abilities and personality. This is best accomplished by creating an “engaging, informative, effective LinkedIn profile.” The career office of the graduate’s alma mater and the Internet is full of excellent resources, some providing step-by-step instructions as to how best create a most flattering profile. Job seekers must keep in mind, however, that a misleading but extremely flattering profile might just lead them to jobs that aren’t a match for their personalities and preferences. New graduates are therefore advised to spend some time on the profile sites of accomplished individuals whose successes they would prefer to emulate. Specific words that the new graduate can apply to himself can be culled from the many possibilities.

Terms to Avoid in Your LinkedIn Profile

As noted earlier, some terms become fashionable buzzwords only to later fall out of favor because of their overuse. Currently, these words include:

  • Creative
  • Organizational
  • Effective
  • Motivated
  • Extensive experience
  • Track record
  • Innovative
  • Responsible
  • Analytical
  • Problem solving.

New words to avoid will develop in the future and your LinkedIn profile should periodically be purged of the new unwanted buzzwords.

Self-Management Tools to Soft Skills

Having reviewed one of the more tangible of the self-management skills necessary for adulthood and successful employment, Part 2 of our series will focus on the necessary people and communication skills for successful employment.

About the author: Lindsey Harper Mac is a professional writer living in the Indianapolis area. She specializes in writing guest posts on social media and education. Currently, Lindsey is completing work on her master’s degree.

Also by Lindsey Harper Mac;

Leadership in the Medical Field: Series Part 2—How Is It Demonstrated?

Leadership in the Medical Field: Series Part 1—What It Is & Why It’s Critical

Career Development Part 1 – Why Get An Advanced Degree? The Answer is Obvious

Career Development Part 2: Want a Promotion? Focus on Factors Within your Control

Career Development Part 3: Performance Reviews: Painful or Helpful?

Entrepreneurs Growing Forward

Why “be the best” when you could be the one making the rules? | WiseWolf Talking – the WiseWolf Coaching Blog.

The Makings of a Great Leader | WiseWolf Talking – the WiseWolf Coaching Blog.

Career Development: Corporate Culture 101: What You Need to Get Started SERIES Part 1: Self-Management Skills

Today we have the first post in a two-part series from our regular contributor, Lindsey Harper Mac. Lindsey is a professional writer living in the Indianapolis area. She specializes in writing guest posts on social media and education. Currently, Lindsey is completing work on her master’s degree. You can find links to some of her earlier posts at the end of the article

Image via CrunchBase

Career Development: Corporate Culture 101: What You Need to Get Started SERIES Part 1: Self-Management Skills

After Graduation

As the final strains of Pomp and Circumstance fade away and almost before the ink is dry on a graduate’s new business management degree, the smartest new graduate will seek to become the most appropriate new hire. Having studied business for the requisite amount of time to have earned the degree in business, the following recommendations should not come as a surprise. However, given the excitement of the occasion, it may be reasonable to repeat some of the basics of what should come next.

New graduates will need to update and perfect their LinkedIn profiles so that they have the best opportunity to connect with a job most appropriate to their education, skills and personalities. This is the most tangible of self-management skills that can collectively be considered exercises in self-discipline. Next, new graduates—preferably new employees at this time—need to learn and master the so-called “soft skills. The specifics of soft skills and how to learn, practice and implement them will be addressed in Part 2 of this series.

Crafting Your LinkedIn Profile

With the increasing reliance that corporate recruiters place on LinkedIn profiles, it is imperative that job seekers correctly and honestly identify their skills, abilities and personalities in order to have the best chance of obtaining a position that is the closest fit. Utilizing the correct adjectives can give a recruiter a better sense of a job seeker’s personality, her degree of self-awareness (or lack thereof), and how narrowly she has defined her appropriate field of employment. Keywords are important and can be very helpful for job seekers for the period of time they are accepted by recruiters. Curiously, however, they have a definite shelf life beyond which use of a particular term or keyword is considered an overused buzzword and becomes detrimental to the user.

Terms to Utilize in Your LinkedIn Profile

The ultimate goal of a new graduate’s LinkedIn profile is to garner a position that is appropriate to her skills, education, abilities and personality. This is best accomplished by creating an “engaging, informative, effective LinkedIn profile.” The career office of the graduate’s alma mater and the Internet is full of excellent resources, some providing step-by-step instructions as to how best create a most flattering profile. Job seekers must keep in mind, however, that a misleading but extremely flattering profile might just lead them to jobs that aren’t a match for their personalities and preferences. New graduates are therefore advised to spend some time on the profile sites of accomplished individuals whose successes they would prefer to emulate. Specific words that the new graduate can apply to himself can be culled from the many possibilities.

Terms to Avoid in Your LinkedIn Profile

As noted earlier, some terms become fashionable buzzwords only to later fall out of favor because of their overuse. Currently, these words include:

  • Creative
  • Organizational
  • Effective
  • Motivated
  • Extensive experience
  • Track record
  • Innovative
  • Responsible
  • Analytical
  • Problem solving.

New words to avoid will develop in the future and your LinkedIn profile should periodically be purged of the new unwanted buzzwords.

Self-Management Tools to Soft Skills

Having reviewed one of the more tangible of the self-management skills necessary for adulthood and successful employment, Part 2 of our series will focus on the necessary people and communication skills for successful employment.

About the author: Lindsey Harper Mac is a professional writer living in the Indianapolis area. She specializes in writing guest posts on social media and education. Currently, Lindsey is completing work on her master’s degree.

Also by Lindsey Harper Mac;

Leadership in the Medical Field: Series Part 2—How Is It Demonstrated?

Leadership in the Medical Field: Series Part 1—What It Is & Why It’s Critical

Career Development Part 1 – Why Get An Advanced Degree? The Answer is Obvious

Career Development Part 2: Want a Promotion? Focus on Factors Within your Control

Career Development Part 3: Performance Reviews: Painful or Helpful?

Entrepreneurs Growing Forward

Why “be the best” when you could be the one making the rules? | WiseWolf Talking – the WiseWolf Coaching Blog.

The Makings of a Great Leader | WiseWolf Talking – the WiseWolf Coaching Blog.

Leadership in the Medical Field: Series Part 3 — Soft Skills & Leadership

Leadership in the Medical Field: Series Part 3 — Soft Skills & Leadership

Today we have the third post in a three-part series from our regular contributor, Lindsey Harper Mac. Lindsey is a professional writer living in the Indianapolis area. She specializes in writing guest posts on social media and education. Currently, Lindsey is completing work on her master’s degree. You can find links to some of her earlier posts at the end of the article and you can find the first post in this series at http://wisewolftalking.com/2012/12/31/leadership-in-the-medical-field-series-part-1-what-it-is-why-its-critical/, the second post is at http://wisewolftalking.com/2013/01/07/leadership-in-the-medical-field-series-part-2-how-is-it-demonstrated/

In Part I of this three-article series, we introduced the concept of leadership in the medical field and explained how critically important the ability is for healthcare providers to demonstrate. The strong and unmistakable correlation between effective leadership in the medical field and the subsequent quality of patient care and satisfactory outcomes was established. That aspect of quality leadership’s immediate impact on patient care was used to justify educating all levels of healthcare personnel, from students in a medical assistant program to those in their first year of their internship. The diagrammatic tool developed by the NHS Institute for Innovation & Improvement and the Academy of Royal Medical Colleges (ARMC) was introduced as a tool to help professionals self-evaluate their leadership skills and identify any areas of weakness that might require attention. This visual tool, deemed The Medical Leadership Competency Framework, was described in brief detail. Now, in Part 2 of this series, we’ll turn our attention to a single wedge of the pie, “Demonstrating Personal Qualities” necessary to be an effective and capable medical leader.

In Parts 1 and 2 of this series of articles, we’ve defined the concept of leadership in the medical field and why it is particularly important as it directly impacts quality of patient care. Because leadership has such a pronounced and direct correlation with patient care and shared leadership is even more beneficial than regular good leadership, this skill is one that needs to be taught at all levels of health care, from the students of a medical assistant program to postdoctoral attending neurosurgeons. We reviewed the the NHS and the AMRC’s Medical Leadership Competency Framework notated diagram, developed to help health care workers self-assess their leadership abilities when divided into five categories:

· Demonstrating personal qualities.

· Working with others.

· Managing services.

· Improving services.

· Setting direction.

In Part 2 of this series we reviewed the components of the leadership aspect “Demonstrating Personal Qualities” which included:

· Developing self-awareness.

· Managing yourself effectively.

· Continuing personal development.

· Acting with integrity.

Social Qualities for Medical Leadership

Part 3 and the final article of this series will review some of the social qualities necessary for medical leadership. Although sometimes referred to as “soft skills,” they are far from easy to acquire and practice with finesse. Yet they are integral to providing quality health care to a population that rises daily with unfilled openings for their providers. These social skills are virtually identical to those identified by Dr. Len Sperry’s work, “Becoming An Effective Health Care Manager: The Essential Skills of Leadership,” so we can assume that the social leadership skills necessary in Great Britain and the United States—despite the different medical systems each offers—are approximate.

 4 Aspects of Medical Leadership in Social Qualities

According to the NHS and ARMC’sMedical Leadership Competency Framework tool, there are four fundamental social quality aspects necessary for healthcare workers to demonstrate in order to be considered effective leaders. These aspects are:

· Developing Networks

As the Competency Framework wisely points out, developing networks means more than just meeting more of the same type of people. Rather, real networks break out of established habits to facilitate collaboration across an entire team of caretakers, regardless of the initials after their names.

· Building and Maintaining Networks

This action speaks more to treating one’s colleagues and team members with respect than it does slapping backs and shaking hands. Real network maintenance requires respect and communication.

· Encouraging Contribution

By demonstrating the respect suggested above, communication and contribution from all team members is facilitated.

· Working Within Teams

Far too many individuals misunderstand “teamwork” and “leadership” as the leader directing the team’s tasks. The real challenge of effective socially grounded leadership is the ability to work within a team as you encourage contribution and communication.

Conclusions Regarding Personal Characteristics of Leadership

As concluded time and again through repeated research, shared leadership provides the highest quality of health care. Our American health care system faces enormous changes over the next decade. A tidal wave of demographic change is already upon us, as the Baby Boomers grow older with better health care and medications. The nursing shortage remains, however, a tremendous issue as health care facilities rush to train paraprofessionals to help supplement nursing care.

Further, the Affordable Care Act signed into law in 2010 by President Obama is designed to do nothing less than overhaul the entire health system with major changes to take place each year, over a decade’s time. The National Center for Health Care Leaderships emphasizes that the current health care providers who want to survive the upcoming changes secondary to the ACA must plan now for that change with effective leadership.

About the author: Lindsey Harper Mac is a professional writer living in the Indianapolis area. She specializes in writing guest posts on social media and education. Currently, Lindsey is completing work on her master’s degree.

Also by Lindsey Harper Mac

Leadership in the Medical Field: Series Part 2—How Is It Demonstrated?

 

Leadership in the Medical Field: Series Part 1—What It Is & Why It’s Critical

Career Development Part 1 – Why Get An Advanced Degree? The Answer is Obvious

Career Development Part 2: Want a Promotion? Focus on Factors Within your Control

Career Development Part 3: Performance Reviews: Painful or Helpful?

Entrepreneurs Growing Forward

Why “be the best” when you could be the one making the rules? | WiseWolf Talking – the WiseWolf Coaching Blog.

The Makings of a Great Leader | WiseWolf Talking – the WiseWolf Coaching Blog.

 

Leadership in the Medical Field: Series Part 2—How Is It Demonstrated?

Leadership in the Medical Field: Series Part 2—How Is It Demonstrated?

Leadership in the Medical Field: Series Part 2—How Is It Demonstrated?

Today we have the second  post in a three-part series from our regular contributor, Lindsey Harper Mac. Lindsey is a professional writer living in the Indianapolis area. She specializes in writing guest posts on social media and education. Currently, Lindsey is completing work on her master’s degree. You can find links to some of her earlier posts at the end of the article and you can find the first post in this series at http://wisewolftalking.com/2012/12/31/leadership-in-the-medical-field-series-part-1-what-it-is-why-its-critical/

In Part I of this three-article series, we introduced the concept of leadership in the medical field and explained how critically important the ability is for healthcare providers to demonstrate. The strong and unmistakable correlation between effective leadership in the medical field and the subsequent quality of patient care and satisfactory outcomes was established. That aspect of quality leadership’s immediate impact on patient care was used to justify educating all levels of healthcare personnel, from students in a medical assistant program to those in their first year of their internship. The diagrammatic tool developed by the NHS Institute for Innovation & Improvement and the Academy of Royal Medical Colleges (ARMC) was introduced as a tool to help professionals self-evaluate their leadership skills and identify any areas of weakness that might require attention. This visual tool, deemed The Medical Leadership Competency Framework, was described in brief detail. Now, in Part 2 of this series, we’ll turn our attention to a single wedge of the pie, “Demonstrating Personal Qualities” necessary to be an effective and capable medical leader.

Personal Qualities for Medical Leadership

According to the NHS and ARMC’s Medical Leadership Competency Framework tool, there are four fundamental character aspects necessary for healthcare workers to demonstrate in order to be considered effective leaders. These aspects are:

  • Developing self-awareness.
  • Managing yourself effectively.
  • Continuing personal development.
  • Acting with integrity.

The four identified characteristics correspond very closely to the second of three key skill sets for an effective healthcare manager, as identified by Dr. Len Sperry’s textbook “Becoming An Effective Health Care Manager: The Essential Skills of Leadership.” We can thus dismiss any objections that the Medical Leadership Competency Framework is applicable only to the U.K.’s socialized medicine standard as opposed to the U.S. model.

Developing Self Awareness

This aspect of leadership seems hardly worth mentioning, until one considers the usual negative effects of a self-absorbed or socially incompetent manager has on a department. Although self-awareness is partly an aspect of maturity, it is also one that can be accelerated with various “reflective practices.” The goal is to perceive one’s own “values, principles, and assumptions” and understand the influence this has on decisions and behaviors.

Managing Yourself Effectively

Translated across the Atlantic, this subtitle speaks to a leader’s ability to demonstrate excellent time management skills, efficiency and establish and maintain both short and long-term goals. This information then needs to be clearly and regularly shared with the team a leader manages.

Continuing Personal Development

Never stop learning might be an alternate subtitle for this suggestion. Aspects of leadership can be taught and learned, either formally or informally. Whether one takes a class or adopts an informal mentor, there is always something to learn that will, in turn, improve your leadership abilities.

Acting with Integrity

Acting with integrity is expressed in Green and Gell’s article as being a role model worthy of your subordinate’s imitation. It also speaks to a type of direct communication that precludes passive-aggressive behavior, innuendo or purposely-misleading statements.

Conclusions Regarding Personal Characteristics of Leadership

As Green and Gell, authors of the article for BMJ Career’s website, “Effective Medical Leadership for Consultants: Personal Qualities and Working with Others,” emphasize, “Research has shown that, within healthcare, shared leadership delivers the best results through a shared sense of responsibility for the success of the organization and the quality of the services provided.” This type of personal and shared leadership will be particularly necessary for those health care organizations experiencing disruptions from mandated changes of the Affordable Care Act.

In the third and final article in this series, we’ll discuss how the above personality traits can be used to effectively communicate with others and to ultimately cultivate and develop a successful career in the medical field.

About the author: Lindsey Harper Mac is a professional writer living in the Indianapolis area. She specializes in writing guest posts on social media and education. Currently, Lindsey is completing work on her master’s degree.

Also by Lindsey Harper Mac

Leadership in the Medical Field: Series Part 1—What It Is & Why It’s Critical

Career Development Part 1 – Why Get An Advanced Degree? The Answer is Obvious

Career Development Part 2: Want a Promotion? Focus on Factors Within your Control

Career Development Part 3: Performance Reviews: Painful or Helpful?

Entrepreneurs Growing Forward

Why “be the best” when you could be the one making the rules? | WiseWolf Talking – the WiseWolf Coaching Blog.

The Makings of a Great Leader | WiseWolf Talking – the WiseWolf Coaching Blog.

Leadership in the Medical Field: Series Part 1—What It Is & Why It’s Critical

Medical Leadership – What and Why

Leadership in the Medical Field: Series Part 1 —What It Is & Why It’s Critical

Today we have the first post in a three-part series from our regular contributor, Lindsey Harper Mac. Lindsey is a professional writer living in the Indianapolis area. She specializes in writing guest posts on social media and education. Currently, Lindsey is completing work on her master’s degree. You can find links to some of her earlier posts at the end of the article.

Leadership in the medical and healthcare field is a critically important subject. It is important for healthcare personnel, those interested in the field and the public to examine at some length. Leadership determines the quality of healthcare provided to patients even during periods of relative stasis. Thus, the topic needs to be provided to all healthcare provider students. That is from those currently completing a medical assistant program to postdoctoral physician fellows. Further, the authority provided by effective leadership helps maintain measured calm. That is through the upcoming periods of change scheduled to take place in the US through 2020 according to the Affordable Care Act of 2010.

Through this series of three articles, we plan to examine what’s meant by the term “medical leadership.” We will discuss why it’s so important to both professionals in the field and patients. What personal attributes are required to be an effective leader. Also the means by which effective leaders work with other healthcare providers.

What is Effective Medical Leadership?

Effective medical leadership is more than the ability to bark out instructions and orders for subordinates to follow and complete. Rather, as Matt Green and Lynne Gell indicate in their recent article for BMJ Career’s website, “Effective Medical Leadership for Consultants: Personal Qualities and Working with Others,” the term is best defined through a theoretical framework that includes the many qualities required of the term and the interactive ways in which it’s demonstrated. As O*Net Online indicates—for a representative healthcare position, a registered nurse (RN)—leadership in the healthcare field also includes aspects of “strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling…. and coordination of people and resources.”

The Medical Leadership Competency Framework

In order to illustrate the qualities, types of qualities and the means of demonstrating leadership, the National Health Service (NHS) Institute for Innovation & Improvement and the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges together developed the Medical Leadership Competency Framework  annotated diagram above. This figure allows physicians and other healthcare workers to visually review the different aspects of medical leadership. They can self-assess themselves as to areas that might require improvement or training. The diagram is in the shape of a circle to represent the holistic ideal of quality of medicine. Within the circle’s core is the ultimate goal, “Delivering the Service.” The center of the circle opens to the outside via five separate lanes. These effectively divide the outer aspect of the framework’s circle into five wedge-like areas that represent the ways in which leadership is demonstrated:

  • Demonstrating personal qualities.
  • Working with others.
  • Managing services.
  • Improving services.
  • Setting direction.

Each of these wedge-like areas is further comprised of four primary characteristics. These indicate how leadership in that particular area is best demonstrated. In Part II and Part III of this article series, we’ll explore what the four primary characteristics are for two of the areas “demonstrating personal qualities” and “working with others.”

Why is Effective Medical Leadership Deemed “Critical?”

As Green and Gel summarized in their paper cited earlier, the connection between effective medical leadership and good medical care is “well documented” and the “key to delivery high quality care and a positive experience for patients.” In part 2 of this series, we’ll discuss further the specific personal qualities that make a good leader in the medical field.

About the author: Lindsey Harper Mac is a professional writer living in the Indianapolis area. She specializes in writing guest posts on social media and education. Currently, Lindsey is completing work on her master’s degree.

Also by Lindsey Harper Mac

Career Development Part 1 – Why Get An Advanced Degree? The Answer is Obvious

Career Development Part 2: Want a Promotion? Focus on Factors Within your Control

Career Development Part 3: Performance Reviews: Painful or Helpful?

Entrepreneurs Growing Forward

Why “be the best” when you could be the one making the rules? | WiseWolf Talking – the WiseWolf Coaching Blog.

The Makings of a Great Leader | WiseWolf Talking – the WiseWolf Coaching Blog.

 

Career Development – More IT jobs are in the cloud – Getting ready for the job you want in 2013

Today we have another post from our regular contributor, Lindsey Harper Mac. Lindsey is a professional writer living in the Indianapolis area. She specializes in writing guest posts on social media and education. Currently, Lindsey is completing work on her master’s degree. You can find links to some of her earlier posts at the end of the article.

Career Development – More IT jobs are in the cloud – Getting ready for the job you want in 2013

More IT jobs are in the cloud! Unless you’ve lived in a box the past year or so, you’re probably aware that cloud services are becoming more and more important in the computing world. It seems nearly all the major, and not so major, companies are working at building their cloud computing departments. Because of that, those IT professionals that have learned what it takes to work with applications and services in the cloud are considered highly desirable by human resources departments today. According to Bill Snyder from Infoworld, “Times are good for those with the right skills.”

The Possibilities

There’s not exactly hard data out there—there’s a lot of blurriness between the lines of cloud computing, SaaS and other architectures—but it is clear that there’s a lot of recent growth in cloud related fields. For instance, stats by Wanted Analytics (an employment statistics firm) show that there is a huge increase in these jobs. For instance, the company noted that in April 2012, there were over 12,000 cloud-related job postings, which was a 50 percent increase over the year before and a 275 percent increase from two years before.

Because of this staggering growth, there are actually more positions open than there are people to fill them, causing a bit of a labor shortage. In Seattle, for instance, cloud-related jobs are taking an average of seven weeks to fill—a very long time when compared to the quick fill rate of most IT positions. A company like Amazon has hundreds of current openings in cloud service jobs.

Knowledge

Since cloud computing is such a new and rapidly growing field,  it’s actually a good time for novices to get involved, even if they don’t have extensive experience with cloud-based services. For instance, at Amazon, someone with basic software and IT knowledge who has the interest in understanding how cloud computing works, is a highly-desirable candidate.

Many different languages are used in the cloud computing world and that makes  it more is difficult to work in, than in regular IT positions. Those with knowledge of Linux, Python, Ruby, C++ and even some other languages are finding new possibilities. Those who know multiple languages, or are willing to learn them, are the ones who find the jobs the easiest. Recruiters encourage a broader skill set in today’s workforce.

Getting Hired

So, what does it take to get hired in these positions other than the basic IT knowledge and a desire to learn? It’s not necessarily a résumé full of certifications. Certifications are lagging behind the current skills used in the marketplace today, so they’re becoming less relevant. According to Mark E. Russinovich of Microsoft, when developing for cloud-related applications, the background and skills of the candidate are what is more important.

Only time will tell whether we’re in for another tech boom, or if this is just a brief growth in an interesting aspect of the overall IT field. Many in the industry, expect that soon qualified candidates will catch up to the needs of the companies and the current glut of IT jobs in cloud computing will not be at the same levels they are now. Because of this, anyone interested in making the move to cloud computing, may wish to get started honing their skills and building their résumé now.

About the author: Lindsey Harper Mac is a professional writer living in the Indianapolis area. She specializes in writing guest posts on social media and education. Currently, Lindsey is completing work on her master’s degree.

Also by Lindsey Harper Mac

Career Development Part 1 – Why Get An Advanced Degree? The Answer is Obvious

Career Development Part 2: Want a Promotion? Focus on Factors Within your Control

Career Development Part 3: Performance Reviews: Painful or Helpful?

Entrepreneurs Growing Forward

Why “be the best” when you could be the one making the rules? | WiseWolf Talking – the WiseWolf Coaching Blog.

The Makings of a Great Leader | WiseWolf Talking – the WiseWolf Coaching Blog.

 

Performance Reviews: Painful or Helpful?

Performance Reviews: Painful or Helpful?

Performance Reviews: Painful or Helpful? Today our guest blogger, Lindsey Harper Mac, presents the third and last in her new series of posts on career development.   Lindsey is a professional writer living in the Indianapolis area. She specializes in writing guest posts on social media and education. Currently, Lindsey is completing work on her master’s degree. You can find the first post in this series at this link – Career Development Part 1 – Why Get An Advanced Degree? The Answer is Obvious and the second at this link –  Career Development Part 2: Want a Promotion? Focus on Factors Within your Control

Career Development Part 3: Performance Reviews: Painful or Helpful?

For many employees, receiving a performance review isn’t a welcome occurrence. It can seem that bosses are being tedious and trying to catch their workers messing up on the job when these reviews are compiled and delivered. In truth, however, an employee review is intended to be a useful tool in promoting employee growth. When done properly, performance reviews should highlight areas of strength and weakness and provide a roadmap for future growth. To better understand the employee review process, consider all the factors that go into a comprehensive employee review.

Work Monitoring

The most notable-–and commonly most nerve tweaking-–part of any employee review is the work-monitoring segment. During this part of the review process, the employer evaluates the worker while he’s on the job and makes note of strengths and weaknesses. In some cases, the worker knows he’s being monitored; in others, the worker is unaware, ensuring that the employer has an accurate picture of the worker’s performance on a day-to-day basis.

Performance History Review

Employers also often review the employee’s history of performance, checking accuracy percentages, sales figures or other numbers indicative of the employee’s level of on-the-job success. By consulting this information, the employer can ensure that, if the work monitoring didn’t yield stellar results, his negative opinion isn’t simply the result of one not-so-hot day on the job.

Collaboration

Employers often collaborate with different individuals within the managerial or HR departments when completing these employee reviews. In doing so, they share their findings and ask the individuals with whom they’re collaborating to reflect upon the data as well. This can go a long way toward ensuring that the overall opinion of the worker’s effectiveness isn’t solely determined by one individual.

Goal Setting

After gathering all the information required to make informed decisions, managers commonly set some goals for what they’d like to see the employee achieve in the next several months or over the course of the next year. They may decide they want to see improved accuracy from an employee whose percentages were found wanting. For an employee they’d like to see advance within the company, they may encourage her to make efforts toward reaching educational goals or obtaining further professional credentials.

Employee Input

After these steps, the employer presents the painstakingly gathered information to the employee. Often, the employee is asked to provide input at this point as well. This could be an explanation of an area that appeared to be weak but is actually stronger than the numbers would suggest. During this portion of the review, the employee is commonly presented with the goals set for her and asked to edit them or agree to them if she feels they’re reasonable.

When employers review their employees’ work, they hope to find these workers are doing everything perfectly. When this isn’t the case, managers can use the information they glean from this careful monitoring of performance to help their employees grow and become better workers within their selected industries. This facilitation of growth is mutually beneficial, as it allows employers to craft stronger workforces and it allows employees to become the best workers they can be.

About the author: Lindsey Harper Mac is a professional writer living in the Indianapolis area. She specializes in writing guest posts on social media and education. Currently, Lindsey is completing work on her master’s degree.

Also by Lindsey Harper Mac

Career Development Part 1 – Why Get An Advanced Degree? The Answer is Obvious

Career Development Part 2: Want a Promotion? Focus on Factors Within your Control

Entrepreneurs Growing Forward

Why “be the best” when you could be the one making the rules? | WiseWolf Talking – the WiseWolf Coaching Blog.

The Makings of a Great Leader | WiseWolf Talking – the WiseWolf Coaching Blog.

 

Career Development Part 3: Performance Reviews: Painful or Helpful?

Today our guest blogger, Lindsey Harper Mac, presents the third and last in her new series of posts on career development.   Lindsey is a professional writer living in the Indianapolis area. She specializes in writing guest posts on social media and education. Currently, Lindsey is completing work on her master’s degree. You can find the first post in this series at this link – Career Development Part 1 – Why Get An Advanced Degree? The Answer is Obvious and the second at this link –  Career Development Part 2: Want a Promotion? Focus on Factors Within your Control

Career Development Part 3: Performance Reviews: Painful or Helpful?

For many employees, receiving a performance review isn’t a welcome occurrence. It can seem that bosses are being tedious and trying to catch their workers messing up on the job when these reviews are compiled and delivered. In truth, however, an employee review is intended to be a useful tool in promoting employee growth. When done properly, performance reviews should highlight areas of strength and weakness and provide a roadmap for future growth. To better understand the employee review process, consider all the factors that go into a comprehensive employee review.

Work Monitoring

The most notable-–and commonly most nerve tweaking-–part of any employee review is the work-monitoring segment. During this part of the review process, the employer evaluates the worker while he’s on the job and makes note of strengths and weaknesses. In some cases, the worker knows he’s being monitored; in others, the worker is unaware, ensuring that the employer has an accurate picture of the worker’s performance on a day-to-day basis.

Performance History Review

Employers also often review the employee’s history of performance, checking accuracy percentages, sales figures or other numbers indicative of the employee’s level of on-the-job success. By consulting this information, the employer can ensure that, if the work monitoring didn’t yield stellar results, his negative opinion isn’t simply the result of one not-so-hot day on the job.

Collaboration

Employers often collaborate with different individuals within the managerial or HR departments when completing these employee reviews. In doing so, they share their findings and ask the individuals with whom they’re collaborating to reflect upon the data as well. This can go a long way toward ensuring that the overall opinion of the worker’s effectiveness isn’t solely determined by one individual.

Goal Setting

After gathering all the information required to make informed decisions, managers commonly set some goals for what they’d like to see the employee achieve in the next several months or over the course of the next year. They may decide they want to see improved accuracy from an employee whose percentages were found wanting. For an employee they’d like to see advance within the company, they may encourage her to make efforts toward reaching educational goals or obtaining further professional credentials.

Employee Input

After these steps, the employer presents the painstakingly gathered information to the employee. Often, the employee is asked to provide input at this point as well. This could be an explanation of an area that appeared to be weak but is actually stronger than the numbers would suggest. During this portion of the review, the employee is commonly presented with the goals set for her and asked to edit them or agree to them if she feels they’re reasonable.

When employers review their employees’ work, they hope to find these workers are doing everything perfectly. When this isn’t the case, managers can use the information they glean from this careful monitoring of performance to help their employees grow and become better workers within their selected industries. This facilitation of growth is mutually beneficial, as it allows employers to craft stronger workforces and it allows employees to become the best workers they can be.

About the author: Lindsey Harper Mac is a professional writer living in the Indianapolis area. She specializes in writing guest posts on social media and education. Currently, Lindsey is completing work on her master’s degree.

Also by Lindsey Harper Mac

Career Development Part 1 – Why Get An Advanced Degree? The Answer is Obvious

Career Development Part 2: Want a Promotion? Focus on Factors Within your Control

Entrepreneurs Growing Forward

Why “be the best” when you could be the one making the rules? | WiseWolf Talking – the WiseWolf Coaching Blog.

The Makings of a Great Leader | WiseWolf Talking – the WiseWolf Coaching Blog.

 

Want a Promotion?

Want a Promotion?

Want a Promotion?  Today our guest blogger Lindsey Harper Mac presents the second in her new series of posts on career development.  The third, and last, post will appear here next week .  Lindsey is a professional writer living in the Indianapolis area. She specializes in writing guest posts on social media and education. Currently, Lindsey is completing work on her master’s degree. You can find the first post in this series at this link – Career Development Part 1 – Why Get An Advanced Degree? The Answer is Obvious

Career Development Part 2: Want a Promotion? Focus on Factors Within your Control

Want a Promotion? Whether or not you get that long-dreamed-about promotion isn’t dependent on one or two easily manipulated factors. Instead, it relies upon a mishmash of influences, both business and employee-related. The business-related elements are ones that are specific to your business environment and ones over which you have less control. The employee-related factors are ones that you can manipulate and, in doing so, potentially increase your chances of obtaining the promotion you seek.

Want a Promotion? Business Factors

  • Your Boss – The degree to which you get along with your boss can play a major part in determining whether or not you find yourself in line for a promotion. If you and your boss get along famously, he’ll be more likely to recommend you for advancement should the opportunity present itself. If, on the other hand, you clash constantly, your name will likely not be at the top of the list when it’s time for him to recommend someone for a promotion.
  • Business Success – Management will be more likely to promote more workers if your specific company is going through a period of profitability. As businesses succeed, they also commonly expand, meaning more underlings are needed to do the work–and, of course, more leaders are needed to guide the company’s inner workings.
  • Industry Growth – Getting a promotion is often easier in a rapidly growing industry. If you happen to work in a field that’s going through a period of growth, you may find that more upper-level positions are being created to meet the increased demands. This growth is something you can capitalize on.
  • Retirements – If you happen to step into the world of work when others are preparing to step out, you may be able to obtain a promotion more quickly. As others retire and vacate their positions, you may find yourself serendipitously able to climb the ladder without having to shove off others already occupying the higher rungs.

Want a Promotion? Employee Factors

  • Education – The more you know and the more credentials you hold, the more obvious a choice you seem for a promotion. If you don’t have education in your specific industry, you may be able to better position yourself for advancement by completing an online education program or attending seminars in a topic that relates to your field.
  • Experience – The experience you bring to the table will make a major difference in determining whether or not you get a promotion. If you come to the position already holding years of experience, you’ll be a logical candidate for promotion. If you aren’t lucky enough to bring this experience with you, enhance your credibility by volunteering to take part in advanced projects or complete duties that may technically be above your current level.
  • Enthusiasm – If you attend work every day, do the minimum and go home, your boss probably won’t reward you with a promotion. The degree of enthusiasm you show is something management will note. If you can be more enthusiastic and eager, you can make yourself seem more dedicated to your business and deserving of a promotion.

Moving up in the corporate world isn’t always within your control. You can, however, take the helm and control the elements of promotability that you can change to ensure these controllable factors don’t stand in the way of that job you wish to hold.

About the author: Lindsey Harper Mac is a professional writer living in the Indianapolis area. She specializes in writing guest posts on social media and education. Currently, Lindsey is completing work on her master’s degree.

Also by Lindsey Harper Mac

Career Development Part 1 – Why Get An Advanced Degree? The Answer is Obvious

Entrepreneurs Growing Forward

Why “be the best” when you could be the one making the rules? | WiseWolf Talking – the WiseWolf Coaching Blog.

The Makings of a Great Leader | WiseWolf Talking – the WiseWolf Coaching Blog.