Job references for those in the public sector

Job references for those in the public sector

Advice from Wendy Smith. Wendy is a Career and Life Coach helping you find fresh perspectives on life and your career.  You can book a FREE coaching session or find out more at this link

Job references for those in the public sector – many public sector organizations will only offer bland references as your employer.  You will need their reference.   But when it arrives it may only be a confirmation that you worked for them in a particular grade over a particular period of time.

Most large private sector employers know this – for others you may have to explain.  You will need something more.  Try asking your line manager or someone in your management line if they would be prepared to give you a personal reference as well as the one sent officially by HR.   Many managers are more ready than you expect to help. Also consider approaching retired senior colleagues and others who have left organisation.

You might consider asking for a personal reference from someone who holds a senior position in the private sector.  This is where people you have met during work in a voluntary capacity may be useful. Otherwise, consider people who you have met through clubs and associations.

You shouldn’t feel embarrassed about asking for a reference. Most people feel flattered to be asked But you should always give people the opportunity to say no and make quite clear that you will understand if they feel they simply don’t know you well enough to help.

Career coaches like me are around to help you thrive in difficult times. Get in touch at this link – I would like to discuss how I can help.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in helping people lead happier lives and feel more fulfilled. She has worked in management as well as coaching and personal development, as well as starting up her own businesses. That means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up a new business or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book a FREE coaching session with Wendy or find out more at this link

 

Job references with no detail of performance

Job references with no detail of performance

Many public sector organisations, and and some others, will only offer bland references as your employer.  You will need their reference.  But when it arrives referencesit may only be a confirmation that you worked for them in a particular grade or post over a certain period of time.

Most large private sector employers will understand this – for others you may have to explain. You will need something more. Try asking your line manager, someone in your management line or a senior colleague if they would be prepared to give you a personal reference. This will be in addition to the one sent officially by HR. Many managers are more ready than you expect to help. Also, consider approaching retired senior colleagues and others who have left organisation.

Consider other referees

You might consider asking for a personal reference from someone who holds a senior position outside your organisation. This is where people you have met during work in a voluntary capacity may be useful. Otherwise, consider people you have met through clubs and associations.

You shouldn’t feel embarrassed about asking for a reference. Most people feel flattered to be asked But you should always give people the opportunity to say no and make quite clear that you will understand if they feel they simply don’t know you well enough to help.

Make sure you check with them each time you plan to give their name. Then, give them a little information about the job for which you are applying. Let them know why you think you are well fitted to fill it. This will help them to give the kind of reference that is really going to help you.

If you need help with your job search, please get in touch.

Wendy Smith is a career, life and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can book a discussion with Wendy about your coaching needs and your personal development at this link

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

Emotional Intelligence and Your Job Search

Using emotional intelligence really can help you succeed in your job search.

But what is emotional intelligence, and why is it that success in life sometimes seems unrelated to intelligence and how hard you are prepared to work?

It has been said that your IQ can land you a job but your lack of EQ (Emotional Intelligence) can get you fired. However, demonstrating emotional and social intelligence is becoming more and more important in your job search.

Many more recruiters and employers now appreciate that emotional intelligence and social intelligence are great determinants of the success you are likely to achieve at work.  A study from Virginia Commonwealth University  has shown that “high emotional intelligence does have a relationship to strong job performance  — in short, emotionally intelligent people make better workers.”  As a result, companies like Microsoft and Deutsche Bank now use EQ tests in their recruitment processes.

Derren Thompson, Manager, Diversity Recruiting for Sodexo, one of the largest services companies in the world reminds readers in their  blog that the “businesses that will succeed in the 21st century will be the ones that allow employees to bring the whole of their intelligence into the work force – their emotional and intellectual self. Not only does this impact morale, but productivity increases, too.”

Recognizing the significance of this, means you can use emotional intelligence to help you succeed in your job search.

But what is emotional intelligence?

In 1996 Daniel Goleman wrote his groundbreaking book “Emotional Intelligence“. His exhaustive research had confirmed that success in life is based more on our ability to manage our emotions than on our intellectual capability or our physical strength.

According to Howard Gardner, the influential Harvard theorist, “Your EQ (Emotional Intelligence Quotient) is the level of your ability to understand other people, what motivates them and how to work cooperatively with them,”

Emotional intelligence is the ability to identify, assess, and manage your own emotions, the emotions of others and also group emotions. It can also be a way of engaging with others that draws them to you.

EQ requires four capabilities;

  1. Self-awareness,
  2. Self-management,
  3. Social awareness
  4. Relationship management.

But EQ can do more for you in your job search than just impress a potential employer, it can help you decide what kind of role to go for.

One way to begin is to ask yourself two questions:

  • First, when do you feel excited or curious? This will help you be clear about your interests and passions.
  • Second,  work out what makes you upset, depressed and angry, and why? This helps you identify your core values and that often makes the difference in whether a job or career will be the right fit for you.

Understanding your emotions can also help you maintain your optimism and cope with stress during a long job search – it can help you stay positive while you find the right role for you.

If you would like to know more about emotional intelligence and how it can help you at work as a manager and leader, go to our sister site WiseWolf Talking– Leadership, Management, Career and Personal Development.  If you would like to know what emotional intelligence might mean for you in your life outside work then please visit WiseWolf’s Your Happiness Factor.

If you would like to read Dr Goleman’s book click on the picture link below and if you would like to try out an EQ test try this link http://testyourself.psychtests.com/testid/3038

Wendy Mason is a Life and Career Coach.  She helps people have the confidence they need to be successful at work and to change career. You can email her atwendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com or ring ++44(0)2084610114 

 

 

Your Help Needed – New Blog – Leaving the Public Sector

I’ve been blogging here at Wisewolf Talking for the last couple of years!  Now I’ve decided to add another blog to the Wisewolf family – Leaving the Public Sector – and I’m seeking your help.

Following the 2010 UK Government Spending Review it was revealed that between them UK Government departments were expected to shed over 100,000 civil service posts as part of their efforts to reduce administration costs.

The UK Government’s cull of quangos, in which 192 public bodies are to be abolished and a further 112 will be merged, will also contribute to an overall headcount loss in the civil service.

In addition vast numbers of posts are likely to be lost from the wider public sector – Local Authorities, the NHS, the BBC etc.

Many public servants have already been invited to consider taking voluntary redundancy, and many more will be invited to do so as reorganisation plans begin to take shape.

Compulsory redundancies cannot be ruled out.

For many public servants this is a time to consider the future and the challenge it presents.

Four years ago I was facing the same challenge.  I left the Civil Service in May 2007 and despite the changing economic climate I have not had one moment of regret!

Since then, as a coach, I have worked with a number of other people leaving public service.

So I’ve decided to start this new blog to share learning and to help people leaving make the most the time ahead. The aim is to;

  • Give them honest advice about the realities of life outside
  • Support them in making their plans
  • Help them carry their plan through!

It will also be a place for people to express their views, if they wish, in the form of comments and to ask questions!

I will welcome contributions from those with experience of leaving, or supporting people leaving, the public sector.

I would be really grateful for your help.  Would you please pass the word on about Leaving the Public Sector to anyone you think might find it helpful!

Also I would love to hear from people who might  be interested in writing for it or sponsoring it!

I am sure this is worthwhile exercise: helping people make the most of their lives has got to be a good thing to do!

Please pass the word on!

Wendy Mason is a performance, programme, contract management and change specialist. She works as a consultant, business coach and blogger. Adept at problem solving, she is a great person to bring in when that one thing you thought was straightforward turns out not to be! If you have a problem talk to Wendy – she can help you – email her atwendymason@wisewolfconsulting.com or ring ++44(0)7867681439