Confident Leadership

Confident Leadership

Confident Leadership – for various reasons which I won’t go into here, I’ve been reading a lot recently about military leadership and the training of military leaders. A key component in military leadership training is the development of confidence – you need to believe in your own competence and vision, if you are to inspire others to follow you.

Now, as a coach, I often work with people who want to develop their confidence. We work together on how they think about themselves and relate to the people they engage with. I teach them techniques to help them develop the competencies they need to have confidence.

The common themes in my approach to helping people develop confidence and how the military does it is, I think, achievement and practice. I encourage people to learn how to move out of their comfort zones, usually in small steps to begin with and then moving up to larger ones. For some people, smiling at a stranger has much in common with overcoming a hurdle on an assault course. The feeling of fear and then knowing how to manage that fear is common to both. The trick is then to repeat the exercise until your comfort zone extends to embrace it – you know you can do it. And those nervous thoughts rarely enter your head.  If they do you, know you can manage them. You take pride in the achievement and, with that, comes confidence.

So if you want to be a good leader, work on your confidence – develop your confident leadership abilities. Take a deep breath and begin to take steps outside your own comfort zone. Find that one small step each day and take it, then take it again. Monitor how it feels before and after – now, you know you can do it. Keep practising. Take pride in your achievements – can’t you feel that confidence grow!

And if you need support in developing your confidence, please get in touch because that is what I do.

Wendy Mason is a career coach.  She helps people reach their goals and aspirations, without sacrificing their home and personal

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

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Confidence and the well equipped leader

Confidence and the well equipped leader

For various reasons which I won’t go into here, I’ve been reading a lot recently about military leadership and the training of military leaders. A key component in military leadership training is the development of confidence – you need to believe in your own competence and vision, if you are to inspire others to follow you.

Now, as a coach, I often work with people who want to develop their confidence. We work together on how they think about themselves and relate to the people they engage with. I teach them techniques to help them develop the competencies they need to have confidence.

The common themes in my approach to helping people develop confidence and how the military does it is, I think, achievement and practice. I encourage people to learn how to move out of their comfort zones, usually in small steps to begin with and then moving up to larger ones. For some people, smiling at a stranger has much in common with overcoming a hurdle on an assault course. The feeling of fear and then knowing how to manage that fear is common to both. The trick is then to repeat the exercise until your comfort zone extends to embrace it – you know you can do it. And those nervous thoughts rarely enter your head.  If they do you, know you can manage them. You take pride in the achievement and, with that, comes confidence.

So if you want to be a good leader, work on your confidence – take a deep breath and begin to take steps outside your own comfort zone. Find that one small step each day and take it, then take it again. Monitor how it feels before and after – now, you know you can do it. Keep practicing. Take pride in your achievements – can’t you feel that confidence grow!

And if you need support in developing your confidence, please get in touch because that is what I do.

Wendy Mason is a career coach.  She helps people reach their goals and aspirations, without sacrificing their home and personal life.  Before working as a coach, Wendy had a long career in both the public and private sectors in general management and consultancy as well as spells in HR.  She now divides her time between coaching and writing. You can contact Wendy at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com and find out more at http://wisewolfcoaching.com

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Outdoor Training – Learning from the wild!

Outdoor Training – Learning from the wild!

Summertime in the Innoko Wilderness, Alaska, USA.
SUMMERTIME IN THE INNOKO WILDERNESS, ALASKA, USA.

“As part of outdoor training programs, students are asked to step back and create functional teams that work across traditional departmental lines and outside of a strict hierarchical structure. Setting goals, making a plan, managing resources (food, fuel, etc.), working as a team, and remaining flexible are crucial to a successful backcountry expedition and the expedition of life. The model focuses on collaborative teamwork to achieve goals. Risk management becomes intuitive given the inherent risks and hazards of remote and wild areas.

Outdoor training “was a life changing time for me,” said Nantucket Nectars and Plum TV founder, Tom Scott. “The stakes are very real. The chain is as strong as its weakest link. The goal is to arrive at the next place as one. All links intact. I came back a different person.”

Even if a team-wide outdoor training isn’t in the cards for your group, getting away from the boardroom and into a more natural setting will allow your team to step out of the standard office roles.”

“Connecting with the wild outdoors in an intense way fosters the kind of self-reliance, judgment, respect, and sense of responsibility that can help leaders thrive in today’s shifting organizational landscape.”

Extracts from

Expedition Leadership in the Wild   by John N. Gans, Havard Business Review 19th April 2011

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

Leadership Training – Learning from the wild!

Summertime in the Innoko Wilderness, Alaska, USA.
SUMMERTIME IN THE INNOKO WILDERNESS, ALASKA, USA.

“As part of outdoor training programs, students are asked to step back and create functional teams that work across traditional departmental lines and outside of a strict hierarchical structure. Setting goals, making a plan, managing resources (food, fuel, etc.), working as a team, and remaining flexible are crucial to a successful backcountry expedition and the expedition of life. The model focuses on collaborative teamwork to achieve goals. Risk management becomes intuitive given the inherent risks and hazards of remote and wild areas.

Outdoor training “was a life changing time for me,” said Nantucket Nectars and Plum TV founder, Tom Scott. “The stakes are very real. The chain is as strong as its weakest link. The goal is to arrive at the next place as one. All links intact. I came back a different person.”

Even if a team-wide outdoor training isn’t in the cards for your group, getting away from the boardroom and into a more natural setting will allow your team to step out of the standard office roles.”

“Connecting with the wild outdoors in an intense way fosters the kind of self-reliance, judgment, respect, and sense of responsibility that can help leaders thrive in today’s shifting organizational landscape.”

Extracts from

Expedition Leadership in the Wild   by John N. Gans, Havard Business Review 19th April 2011