Get on with the interview panel

Get on with the interview panel

How to get on with the interview panel – most job searches mean you have to deal with panel interviews.  Many large employers use panel interviewing as a part of their recruitment process.  It means a number of different people can be involved in the decision-making process.  They can be from different parts of the organization with an interest in the role. This gives a range of perspectives. Job interviews conducted by a panel are seen to be fair. There are seen as valid because a number of different opinions and views are taken into account..

Usually, each panel member will take turns to ask questions about your fitness for the role; your background, experience and interests.  It can be difficult to build rapport with each panel member . And sometimes, unfortunately, there might be one panel member that you find it particularly difficult to get on with.  This can happen at an interview, just as it can in other parts of your life.

Get on with the interview panel – tips

    • Knowing who the panel members are beforehand is a great help.  If you can, research people on the internet using LinkedIn, for example!  If this is not possible, use your knowledge of the company and the position to prepare to respond to questions from different parts of the organization. These could be human resources, line management, technical and finance.
    • Your introduction is important to creating the right first impression. This is a good opportunity to connect with each panel member on a personal level before the interview questions begin. Make initial eye contact with each panel member. Try to respond warmly and with interest.

When the questions start, listen carefully to what is being asked

  • When the questions start, listen carefully to what is being asked and don’t be afraid to ask for clarification. Make sure you understand correctly.  It is important to answer the question that has been asked.
  • Make initial eye contact with the person who asked the question. And then include the other panel members in your answer. Scan from one face to the next, pausing briefly on each. Focus on speaking to each individual As you finish your answer, return your focus to the person who asked the interview question. Stay calm and answer each question thoroughly.

Keep it pleasant

  • If you do get into a discussion, or you are asked to consider an alternative point of view, again stay calm. Do not expect to be successful if you let anger or annoyance show. Take time to respond with a considered view. Watch your body language. You can show frustration without saying a word.
  • If there is someone on the panel that you really cannot get on with, then don’t ignore how they make you feel and why.  Is that person to be your immediate boss in the new organization, or someone further up the line to whom you will report? Think seriously about whether the role is right for you.  Do this even if you are successful and it is a generous offer. I have worked with a number of clients who sensed at interview that all was not well. They ignored those feelings, only to have regrets later.

With the right preparation and approach, I hope you will get on well with all the members of any interview panel that you meet. If you need advice, get in touch.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

a>

Listening at interviews

Listening at interviews

Listening at interviews is important. To be able to listen well is a skill.  And it is a skill that you need in job search at interviews.

What matters at interviews is that you really hear the question asked. That question is the one you answer.

It is all to easily, particularly when you are nervous, to hear headline words. You hear just the “keywords” and respond to them.  For example, you hear the word “experience,”! Then, you don’t stop to think, you just pour out all your experience.  You don’t take in that the question was about a particular part of your experience.  Or perhaps, more importantly, you don’t answer a question about how your experience is relevant to this role.

So, try to settle any nerves before you go into the interview room. There is relaxation exercise you can use at this link.  Then to determine to listen carefully to all the words in the question. Take the time needed to put together a response in your mind before speaking.  If you need to, ask for clarification. Much better that then to take a wild guess and give an inappropriate answer.

Listen carefully, pace yourself and answer the question asked!  The extra time you take will make you a far more impressive candidate. Remember how you answer will tell the panel a lot the qualities of both your judgement and your decision making ability.

If you need advice preparing for an important interview, then get in touch – working with a career coach can make all the difference.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

What salary should you ask for?

What salary should you ask for?

What salary should you ask for? As a career and life coach, I do not give financial advice. But clients do ask me about negotiating reward packages.  It is worth thinking about what salary to ask for.

If you have been out of work for sometime, asking for what you were paid in your last paid role may not be the best strategy.

I usually suggest people work out what they are spending now and then how much they need to meet all their current obligations.  That includes their obligations to themselves and those they love to keep fit, stay healthy and have some entertainment.

I ask them to check each item to decide whether it really is a “must have” or is it a “would like “!

Now, they know their baseline requirement.

What salary is right for the job?

The next step is to find out what salary people in their line of work  at the same level, are being paid now. What is reasonable for people at your level with your experience.  It is great if you are going to be in the kind of work where you can show that your activities will be covering your salary cost.  For most of us it isn’t like that. But do think through clearly  for your self the benefits that you will bring. If you bring added value then expect to see it reflected in your remuneration.

Remember to take benefits into account in making your decision – people moving out of the public sector in particular don’t always think about that.

Be prepared to negotiate. Take time to think about any offer. Have you been out of work for some time? If so, you may have to accept that you will be earning less than before.  But if you are as good as you think you are, hopefully, you will soon be back to the level you aspire to!

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

Do you include a profile statement in your CV?

Do you include a profile statement in your CV?

Profile statement – A few thoughts on the value of including a short summary profile at the top of your CV!

This profile is sometimes called the career summary, personal profile statement, profile statement, resume summary, and summary of qualifications. All refer to profiling your key qualifications for a particular job on your résumé.

The profile sums up your skills and experience, and it can include your career goals. This is a part of your CV that you should certainly tailor to the particular needs of the specific job for which you are applying. These are the headline words that will flag up to a recruiter why you are right for the role.

Essentially, a profile is a very condensed and targeted version of a cover letter. And there are clear benefits to including a good one. It can help you stand out among the hundreds of applications companies receive. Most employers spend only a few seconds looking at your CV, and most of this time is spent looking at the top half of it. So, even if a potential employer reads only your profile (located directly beneath your name and contact information), they will still have a clear idea of how uniquely well fitted you are for the role.

In addition, your profile can include Keywords that will help your application get picked up by the recruiting management software that many companies use now use to screen applications.

Keep your profile concise – between one and four short sentences and you can use bullet points. Focus on the requirements for the job and what you have to offer. Overall, integrate your employment history and skills into the qualifications listed for the job – make sure right at first glance, you look like the best candidate.

Wendy Mason is the The Career Coach – helping you to find fresh perspectives on your Job Search and Career. She helps you work towards your goals and aspirations, in a way that fits in with both work and home life. Email her at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com,  find her on Skype at wendymason14, or call +44 (0) 2081239146 (02081239146 for UK callers) or +1 262 317 9016 if you are in the US.

A free trial/consultation allows you to try phone coaching from the comfort of your own home and without risk. Don’t forget to ask about the Summer Special Offer 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Interview Preparation: Identify Your Strengths

Interview Preparation: Identify Your Strengths to show your Potential Career Performance

Interview Preparation – today’s guest post come from Tamara M. Williams who reads guides and books related to personal and career development and encourages you to do the same. Tamara publishes other articles, read more at http://ezinearticles.com/?expert=Tamara_M._Williams

Identifying your strengths is very important for interview preparation. Interviewers always ask about your strengths and how they can be applied to the job. Strengths demonstrate your accomplishments in life. Accomplishments are directly tied to areas that are your strong points. In addition, knowing your strengths help you to decide other industries you should work in and other qualifications that you should seek. Determine your strengths by following the steps below.

Identify all your academic qualifications: First, make a list of your academic qualifications. These would include all your associate, bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral degrees. These qualifications showed that you have the skills and knowledge needed in a particular field. For e.g. a BSc in Computer Science indicate that you have knowledge in creating applications using various programming languages. This also shows that you have Problem-solving skills.

Identify all your professional qualifications: Second, make a list of your professional qualifications. These were most likely obtained after gaining some work experience. These demonstrate that you have strengths in a particular subject, product or service in a specific industry. The qualifications are awarded by professional bodies. For e.g. the Associate or Fellow Chartered Certified Accountant (ACCA or FCCA) is conferred by the Association of Chartered Certified Accountants. This indicates knowledge in using Accounting software such as QuickBooks or Sage. You would also have Book-keeping / Budget skills.

Identify all your academic experience:  Third, identify all the clubs and societies that you participated in while at college or university. For e.g. being a member of a Performing Arts Club would indicate that you have Organization, Project Management and People skills. In addition, you could have knowledge of the various works of Shakespeare.

Identify all your professional experience: Finally, list all the companies that you worked with, your job titles and specific projects that you worked on and what you achieved. This list would include summer jobs, part-time and full-time work, internships and volunteer work. Once again what you achieved during your work assignments would show your strengths. For e.g. in one project you created the Company and Product/Service brochures. Then you presented this information at seminars and conferences. This means that you have Writing and Reporting, and Communication skills. Besides that shows knowledge of a particular product or service specific to that industry such as the Food and Beverage Industry.

Now that you have completed this exercise you are more prepared to answer questions related to your strengths when interviewing for a new job, promotion or a raise. This shows that your skills and knowledge gave you great achievements in the past and are capable of doing greater in the future. Remember to give yourself a pat on the back for all your hard work and good luck in your career! 

About the Author:

Tamara M. Williams reads guides and books related to personal and career development. She encourages you to do the same. Contact your college or university career center or a Life & Career Coach for more assistance. Tamara also publishes other articles, read more at http://ezinearticles.com/?expert=Tamara_M._Williams

Related articles

  • Why Telephone Coaching Works
  • Career Development – The Value of a Career Plan and Making One!
  • Job Search – Top Ten Job Search And Social Media Questions
  • Job Search: How to find a new job using LinkedIn!

;

Enhanced by Zemanta

Getting Fired – How to handle it

Getting Fired – How to handle it

Career Development – Worst Case Scenario – How To Handle Getting Fired

Getting fired is miserable. Below is a great post from About.com Job Searching by the wonderful  on how to handle it. The employment law she refers to is American and you will need to check what applies in your country. But I believe the themes and her wise advice apply generally.

“Getting fired, unfortunately, can happen to the best of us. It can happen even when it’s not your fault. There could be a personality conflict between yourself and your supervisor. Your idea of what the job was going to be like might differ from what management was thinking. You could have simply screwed up. It happens. You’re not alone.

Wrongful Termination

Experts estimate that at least 250,000 workers are illegally or unjustly fired (wrongful termination) each year and that’s not counting those that were justifiably terminated. Regardless of the circumstances, what to do if you’ve been fired? Where do you go from here?

Getting Fired

First of all, don’t beat yourself up. As I said, getting fired can happen to the best of us. Don’t dwell on it. Instead, focus on what you are going to do next and how you are going to find another job. Keeping in mind that another hurdle – the stigma of being fired – has just been added to your job search. That said, there are ways you can address this issue and put it in at least a neutral, if not a positive, light.

You can read the rest of the post at this link http://jobsearch.about.com/od/salary/a/fired.htm

The support of a career coach can make a huge difference in these circumstances and I offer a free taster coaching session if you would like some quick advice – contact details are below.

Wendy Mason is the The Career Coach – helping you to find fresh perspectives on your Job Search and Career. She helps you work towards your goals and aspirations, in a way that fits in with both work and home life. Email her at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com,  find her on Skype at wendymason14, or call +44 (0) 2081239146 (02081239146 for UK callers) or +1 262 317 9016 if you are in the US.

A free trial/consultation allows you to try phone coaching from the comfort of your own home and without risk. Don’t forget to ask about the Summer Special Offer 

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Interview Checklist

Interview Checklist

Job Search – The Interview Checklist

Interview checklist – are you ready for that interview? This interview checklist will take you step by step you through everything you need to do to be a success!

What are you going to wear?

The first impression you make on a potential employer can make a big difference. So you need to dress appropriately for a job interview – check out what passes for appropriate business dress in the organization you wish to join. Ask around among your contacts; but note, a business suit is usually standard. Have your interview outfit ready to go, so you can be ready for an interview at very short notice. If you are being interviewed online with a camera switched on, think about how you will look and make sure the background is business like.  Check how you will look before you go online

Review your response to the advert and job description

Take the time to remind yourself how you meet the requirement. Then make sure you have your list available for the interview of exactly how you meet the skills, knowledge and qualities required by the employer. Emphasize those most important for success in the job. Be ready to describe successes you have had that make you the perfect match for the job. The closer your qualifications and experience match the job requirements, the better chance you’ll have of getting a second round interview and a job offer.

Research the organization and those interviewing you

How much do you know about the organization itself? Before you go to the interview be sure you are well informed. Do an internet search and use LinkedIn.

Use your contacts

Do you know anyone who is working at the organization or who has worked there recently? Knowing someone can make a big difference – they might be able to put in a good word for you. Plus your contacts can help you with inside information about the organization, its people and, possibly, the recruitment process itself.

Prepare for Interview Questions

Take time to think through questions you are likely to be asked during the interview. This will help you to organize your answers and it will help to reduce stress.  Ask a friend or family or family member to help you practice your answers – if they are prepared to give you a mock interview so much the better.

Prepare for a presentation

Check whether a presentation is required and then find out as much as possible about the subject.  If they don’t suggest one, then concentrate on showing how you are fitted and how you would approach the job.  Prepare your materials well in advance if you can and have spare copies. Have handouts ready and to a good quality – again take enough for the panel and some spares.  Check out what technology and other material will be available for your use.  If using your own equipment, make sure it is working properly on the day. Don’t assume you can use your own without making inquiries first and ask about plugs etc. Run through your presentation, preferably in front of as friend, beforehand.

Have Clear Travel Directions and Allow Plenty of time

It’s important to know where you need to go for your job interview. You don’t want to be late so start in good time. Use Google Maps to get directions if you’re not sure where you are going.  Check on parking and/or public transport so you arrive with time to spare.

Time to relax!

Check out your appearance when you arrive and then use a simple breathing technique to help you relax – here is a link to one; http://www.yourhappinessfactor.net/2011/02/angry-frustrated-and-stressed-relax-and.html

I hope you have found this Interview Checklist useful.  Now go in there and wow them.  I wish you every success and if you would like some extra help, please get in touch.

Wendy is the The Career Coach – helping you to find fresh perspectives on your Job Search and Career. She helps you work towards your goals and aspirations, in a way that fits in with both work and home life. Email her at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com,  find her on Skype at wendymason14, or call +44 (0) 2081239146 (02081239146 for UK callers) or +1 262 317 9016 if you are in the US.

A free trial/consultation allows you to try phone coaching from the comfort of your own home and without risk. Don’t forget to ask about the Summer Special Offer 

  • Job Search – The Interview – Competency Based Interview Questions and Answers
  • Job Search – Mistakes to Avoid in Your Telephone Interview
  • Job Search – Do Your Email Address and Voicemail Message Help Your Job Search?
Enhanced by Zemanta

Competency Based Interview Questions

Competency Based Interview Questions

Job Search – The Interview – Competency Based Interview Questions and Answers

Competency Based Interview Questions! Here is a straight forward overview of the competency-based job interview process.

The guide includes insider tips and guidance on how competency-based questions are asked. It describes how the competency-based is conducted and how to succeed at this type of interview. Learn how to structure your answers and prove your ability to perform well in the job.

This video is from http://www.job-interview-site.com/com…

Wendy is the Happiness Coach and author of  The Wolf Project and a new novel, Blood Brothers, to be published in Summer 2013.  As a life and career coach and blogger, she helps people reach their goals and aspirations. As a novelist she hopes to entertain. Oh and she writes poetry too! To find out more email wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com,  find her on Skype at wendymason14, or call +44 (0) 2081239146 (02081239146 for UK callers) or +1 262 317 9016 if you are in the US.

A free trial/consultation allows you to try phone coaching from the comfort of your own home and without risk.  And remember there are great benefits to be achieved from coaching by phone or Skype.

CV review and interview preparation and coaching to improve your confidence and self esteem are a speciality

  • Why Telephone Coaching Works
  • Job Search Techniques To Help You Stand Out From The Crowd
  • Gestures and Body Language Tutorial
  • Job Search – Dealing With The Killer Interview Questions
Enhanced by Zemanta

Interview Questions

Interview Questions

Job Search – Dealing With The Killer Interview Questions

Interview Questions – Career Coach Peggy McKee gives you tips and ideas on how to prepare for those killer questions. Are you prepared?


This video is from http://careerconfidential.com/specials/peggys-podcast-weekly/
Wendy is the Happiness Coach and author of  The Wolf Project and a new novel, Blood Brothers, to be published in Summer 2013.  As a life and career coach and blogger, she helps people reach their goals and aspirations. As a novelist she hopes to entertain. Oh and she writes poetry too! To find out more email wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com,  find her on Skype at wendymason14, or call +44 (0) 2081239146 (02081239146 for UK callers) or +1 262 317 9016 if you are in the US.

A free trial/consultation allows you to try phone coaching from the comfort of your own home and without risk.  And remember there are great benefits to be achieved from coaching by phone or Skype.

CV review and interview preparation and coaching to improve your confidence and self esteem are a speciality

Enhanced by Zemanta

Job Search Techniques

Job Search Techniques

Job Search Techniques To Help You Stand Out From The Crowd

Job Search Techniques – with increased competition for jobs, it’s more important than ever to brand and market yourself to find success. Career coach Linda Ginac, Master PCM and CEO of The  Ginac Group, offers tips on how to find your talents and the value you can bring to a company and then use professional techniques to advertise yourself.  (This video is Copyright MyFoxAustin.com)

Wendy Mason is the Happiness Coach and author of a new novel, The Wolf Project.  Wendy is a life and career coach and writer. She is passionate about helping people find happiness at work and at home! To find out more email wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com, find her on Skype at wendymason14, or call +44 (0) 2081239146 (02081239146 for UK callers) or +1 262 317 9016 if you are in the US.  

A free trial/consultation allows you to give phone coaching a real trial without any financial risk. And remember there are great benefits to be achieved from coaching by phone or Skype.

CV review and interview preparation a speciality

  • Why Telephone Coaching Works
  • Job Hunting Tips : How to Make a Job Search Plan
  • Job Search: How to find a new job using LinkedIn!
  • Job Search – Top Ten Job Search And Social Media Questions

 

Enhanced by Zemanta