Energy For Your Job Search

Energy For Your Job Search

Advice from Wendy Smith; Career Coach and author of The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book – Wendy’s books on Amazon

You need energy for your job search – just as you do to complete any other project in your work life. It is all too easy when you are working from home – for job search as at other times – to lose the habits that help you stay healthy.

Energy for your job search; the basics

Most of us need seven or eight hours of good quality sleep to perform at our best. Sometimes I ask clients to keep a sleep diary so they can work out exactly how much sleep they need. They record the hours they slept and how the felt the next day. If you try it, you can pretty quickly work out what is the best sleep for you. Make sure your bedroom is comfortable, dark enough and quiet – this really isn’t the place for computers and televisions.

As your mother always told you; eat a good breakfast that sets up your energy levels for the day. Try making porridge and not buying packaged cereals full of sugar and add fruit to the tray.

Grazing on small, frequent meals is better for your system than eating large meals with a long break in between. Eat Energy For Your Job Searchunrefined complex carbohydrates like whole wheat with every meal. Cut back on tea, coffee, chocolate and canned drinks and drink lots of water to feel really good.

Make sure you get out of the house and into the fresh air each day. And have an exercise routine, even if it is just regular walking. A half hour walk each day will help to keep you healthy. Always take medical advice before starting a vigorous new exercise routine; perhaps this may be the time to start swimming again – it is great exercise and very inexpensive.

Other resources to help your job search

In the job market, there are always lots of useful techniques to learn or to refresh. From writing a modern CV to wooing at the interview, you’ll find lots of tips in my handy little pocket-book.

Stress-free Job Search
A concise and practical little workbook. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

A concise and practical little work book, it is for all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

Find this and my other books on my Amazon page at this link; http://ow.ly/BRSAL

Remember working with a career coach can really help both  job search and career resilience. Get in touch at the Facing a mid-career dilemmaemail address below – I offer a free half hour trial session by phone or Skype.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book your free 30 minute, no obligation, trial coaching session with Wendy Smith now at this Link 

Job references for those in the public sector

Job references for those in the public sector

Advice from Wendy Smith. Wendy is a Career and Life Coach helping you find fresh perspectives on life and your career.  You can book a FREE coaching session or find out more at this link

Job references for those in the public sector – many public sector organizations will only offer bland references as your employer.  You will need their reference.   But when it arrives it may only be a confirmation that you worked for them in a particular grade over a particular period of time.

Most large private sector employers know this – for others you may have to explain.  You will need something more.  Try asking your line manager or someone in your management line if they would be prepared to give you a personal reference as well as the one sent officially by HR.   Many managers are more ready than you expect to help. Also consider approaching retired senior colleagues and others who have left organisation.

You might consider asking for a personal reference from someone who holds a senior position in the private sector.  This is where people you have met during work in a voluntary capacity may be useful. Otherwise, consider people who you have met through clubs and associations.

You shouldn’t feel embarrassed about asking for a reference. Most people feel flattered to be asked But you should always give people the opportunity to say no and make quite clear that you will understand if they feel they simply don’t know you well enough to help.

Career coaches like me are around to help you thrive in difficult times. Get in touch at this link – I would like to discuss how I can help.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in helping people lead happier lives and feel more fulfilled. She has worked in management as well as coaching and personal development, as well as starting up her own businesses. That means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up a new business or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book a FREE coaching session with Wendy or find out more at this link

 

Older Job Seekers

Older Job Seekers

Advice from Wendy Smith. Wendy is a Career and Life Coach helping you find fresh perspectives on life and your career.  You can book a FREE coaching session or find out more at this link

Older Job Seekers – I’ve been thinking about the challenges that older job seekers face. In my experience they do have it tougher. But, if you ane an older job seeker, with the right approach you can radically increase your chances of success.

Getting a job as an older candidate usually means working hard on projecting an energetic and delivery focussed image that doesn’t actually include how old you are.  You can show evidence of capabilities without necessarilty saying how long you’ve spent honing them.

Older job seekers need to put a lot into “managing the brand.” Commit to good presentation, as well hard evidence of what you can deliver. It is important for all job seekers but particularly for older candidates.  Think about how you are likely to be perceived. A confident, upright, open, posture projects energy. Let your enthusiam show through. Work hard not to show cynicism.

Do your homework on the latest developments in your field. Show that you are not afraid to learn new things. But at the same time show you do have wisdom and experience to share. Youe experience of life, as well as work, will be useful to them.

Career coaches and life  coaches like me are around to help you thrive and succeed in challenging times. I’ve worked with lots of older candiddates to help them find and win good opportunities. Get in touch at this link – I would like to discuss how I can help you.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in helping people lead happier lives and feel more fulfilled. She has worked in management as well as coaching and personal development, as well as starting up her own businesses. That means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up a new business or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book a FREE coaching session with Wendy or find out more at this link

 

Stand Out At Interview

Stand Out At Interview

Job Search: How to Stand Out From The Crowd

Advice from Wendy Smith; Career Coach and author of The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book – order on Amazon

Stand out at interview if you want to be successful. If you want to be offered that longed-for job, these days you need to do more than simply prove you can do the work. It is likely that you will be one among several candidates who can provide evidence of that.

So what can mark you out as that special candidate – the one they want?

I’ve spent a lot of time thinking about my experience as both interviewer and interviewee. I’ve come to the conclusion it all comes down to the three Es; enthusiasm, energy and engagement.

Stand out at interview – enthusiasm

It is great if a candidate shows they really care about my vacancy. I don’t want to feel that mine is just another on the long list they have applied for. If they are interested in my job, they will have done their home work and know about my organization, who our customers are and the sector we work in. They will be able to show me why they think this is a great opportunity for them.

Energy

I want to find a sense of resilience and energy. The successful candidate is going to be someone not likely to be daunted by the challenges ahead.

Engagement

Candidates who actively engage with the interviewer and the interview process put themselves at the head of the field. By that I mean someone who walks into the room with confidence and then takes part in a real discussion. Not someone who simply pours out information in response to the questions asked. Their body language will show real interest and they will keep up good eye contact. They will have high self-esteem without arrogance.

If you can show the three Es at your next interview, you are pretty much bound to make a good impression.

Other resources to help your job search

In the job market, there are always lots of useful techniques to learn or to refresh. From writing a modern CV to wooing at the interview, you’ll find lots of tips in my handy little pocket book.

Stand Out At Interview
A concise and practical little workbook. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

A concise and practical little work book. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

Find this and my other books on my Amazon page at this link; http://ow.ly/BRSAL

Remember working with a career coach can really help career resilience. Get in touch at the Facing a mid-career dilemmaemail address below – I offer a free half hour trial session by phone or Skype.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book your free 30 minute, no obligation, trial coaching session with Wendy Smith now at this Link 

Give the recruiter what they say they want

Give the recruiter what they say they want

Advice from Wendy Smith; Career Coach and author of The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book – order on Amazon

Here is a tip from my book; The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book; How to Win Jobs and Influence Recruiters.

Give the recruiter what they say they want – successful companies focus on meeting the wants of their customers. Note what I said there; I wrote the word “wants,” not the word “needs”. A customer may not know what they need. But they do know what they want. And that may well not be the same thing. It is all too easy to lose sight of this. Then, you focus on what you think they need or, even worse, what you feel comfortable delivering.

If you stop to think about it, exactly the same thing applies when you are applying for jobs.

Getting the job doesn’t so much depend on you providing what you think they need. It depends on you providing what they think they want and believe they need. Give the recruiter what they say they want – it is important.

This may come as a shock to some unsuccessful candidates who believed they had what it took to do the job. They had decided what the employer should be looking for in a particular role. So that is what they set out to show. But what the employer believed they wanted was something rather different.

This is why it is so important to read the job specification carefully! Then make sure you show how you can deliver exactly what the employer has said they need. If there is no job specification, ask lots of questions and research the employing organization carefully.

If the recruiting employer really is way off the mark in terms of what they think they want, they are much more likely to listen to you when they are convinced by your credentials.

Win their confidence first in, say, your technical ability, then try to do a little re-education. But do it with care – it is just possible there is very good reason for what they wanted. Confidence is all in job search but don’t give the recruiter an opportunity to confuse that with arrogance.

Other resources for the job seeker

As a job seeker, there are lots of useful techniques to learn or to refresh. From writing a modern CV to wooing at the interview, you’ll find lots of tips in my handy little pocket book.

job search networking
A concise and practical little workbook. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

A concise and practical little work book. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

Find this and my other books on my Amazon page at this link; http://ow.ly/BRSAL

Remember working with a career coach can really help job search. Get in touch at the Facing a mid-career dilemmaemail address below – I offer a free half hour trial session by phone or Skype.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book your free 30 minute, no obligation, trial coaching session with Wendy Smith now at this Link 

Job Search through Social Networking

Job Search through Social Networking

Job Search – Using Social Media

Advice from Wendy Smith. Wendy is a Career and Life Coach helping you find fresh perspectives on life and your career.  You can book a FREE coaching session or find out more at this link

Job Search through Social Networking – we all know by now that networking is one of the most important parts of job search. But not all of us are confident about using social media. This is a pity because social media sites will play an increasing role in networking, career advancement, and professional success in the future. If you are a reluctant user of social networking, I hope these tips will help.

Remember that most, if not everything, you do on-line stays there forever and most can probably be found fairly easily by a potential employer.  So make sure everything you do and write on-line is compatible with the image you want that  potential employer to form.

LinkedIn

Join LinkedIn if you have not already done so.  Have a look at the profiles of leaders in your professional field and the approach they have taken.  Fill out your profile with an eye to recording your achievements and making yourself an attractive job prospect. Find friends and former colleagues to connect with and join groups that represent you professional interest.  You can join up to 50 groups and you can connect with other group members. Take part in group discussions to show your expertise and update your status with useful links and information for others – become a resource. Do not head up your profile with “looking for work” but use keywords related to the kind of work you are looking for in your profile to attract recruiters.

Facebook

More and more people every day seem to be using Facebook for professional networking, although personally I have some reservations.  Do not mix social and professional networking on Facebook and choose your Friends wisely. Remember your Friends can see information about your other Friends in your Profile. Be careful of the amount and type of information that you share.  Make sure you post only what you want business contacts or prospective employers to see and post content relevant to your job search or career. Again you can demonstrate your expertise.  Facebook can showcase you in the round for a potential employer and that, properly managed, is positive.

Twitter

Twitter is a social networking and what is known as a microblogging service – you can and people do write messages to change the world in 140 characters. Twitter is open-ended and people and companies use it in a variety of ways, including to job search. But in 140 characters or less, it’s tough to apply for a job! However, you can tell colleagues and employers that you are looking. Find contacts and recruiters on Twitter and begin to follow them to see new opportunities.  Follow companies and organizations that you would like to work for to find out what they are up to.  Post useful links and information and interact with others – Twitter is all about conversations! You can find me on Twitter as @WWisewolf

Use social networking sites to create your professional brand and build your on-line presence strategically  to help with your job searching and career.
Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in helping people lead happier lives and feel more fulfilled. She has worked in management as well as coaching and personal development, as well as starting up her own businesses. That means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up a new business or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book a FREE coaching session with Wendy or find out more at this link

 

Your first day in a new job!

Your first day in a new job!

Career Development: Your first day in a new job!

Advice from Wendy Smith; Career Coach and author of The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book – order on Amazon

Here is a tip from my book; The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book; How to Win Jobs and Influence Recruiters.

Your first day in a new job! – so you are starting a new job on Monday. Many congratulations. Here are a few tips to help you make a good impression on your first day.

  1. If you’ve been out of work for some time, you may need to re-train your body to keep regular “working” hours. To do this successfully you need a couple of weeks, if possible, of going to bed and getting up at the same time as you will when you start work. That should give your internal clock some chance of adapting.
  2. Make sure you test drive the journey to your new workplace at the time of day when you will be travelling. If you take public transport, check the timetable and on your first day allow at least ten minutes extra for your journey. This isn’t the day to be late
  3. Every office has its own informal (and sometimes formal) dress code. Pay attention to what other people are wearing when you go for the interview. If you are not sure then speak to the HR department and ask them. You want to fit in as quickly as you can and how you dress can help you. In any case go for clean and well-pressed clothes and clean your shoes. Don’t break in new shoes on your first day.
  4. The first day will be a whirlwind of introductions and meetings. You’ll collect lots of information but there will be lots you are likely to forget. Carry a small notebook and make notes – you’ll be grateful later. For technical stuff, learn the names of those to go to for advice; don’t try to learn complicated routines on your first day. Names and roles are usually the most important notes to take; people like you to remember their name.
  5. Don’t be scared to ask questions. If your boss gives you a task, try to get all the details straight during that first meeting. Asking questions won’t look stupid – just intelligent and thorough. Ask who, apart from the boss, you could go to with later questions if you have them.
  6. Remember, the best way to get people on-side is to listen to them. Show respect for their opinions even if you don’t agree with them. Make sure you understand their ideas and value them before considering introducing your own.

Other resources for the job seeker

As a job seeker, there are lots of useful techniques to learn or to refresh. From writing a modern CV to wooing at the interview, you’ll find lots of tips in my handy little pocket book.

Your first day in a new job!
A concise and practical little workbook. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

A concise and practical little work book. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

Find this and my other books on my Amazon page at this link; http://ow.ly/BRSAL

Remember working with a career coach can really help job search. Get in touch at the Facing a mid-career dilemmaemail address below – I offer a free half hour trial session by phone or Skype.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book your free 30 minute, no obligation, trial coaching session with Wendy Smith now at this Link 

Be passionate in your job search

Be passionate in your job search

Job Search:Time To Be Passionate

Advice from Wendy Smith; Career Coach and author of The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book – order on Amazon

Be passionate –  when people talk to me about career development and job search, I tell them they need to be clear about what really matters to them. Lots of people look for roles that show what they think they should want. They don’t consider what they actually enjoy doing. Usually, this has to do with money! It is difficult to be passionate about a job you do just for the money. And being passionate is key to impressing a prospective employer.

Now, let us not be naive, money is important to most of us. But to take a job that meets no other criteria, can be the first step on the road to disaster.

You need to understand what you really care about. And when it comes to interviews, you may well be asked what you are passionate about.

But, you have to be practical. Saying that your passion is for something that is going to mean traveling to the other side of the world for weeks at a time may not get you that job with a local employer.

Be honest. But think about what is going to present you in a reasonable light at your interview. And make sure that you can back up your statement with information about your experience and future intentions.

Do not declare a passion for something you know very little about it. You should be able to talk about your choice with interest and enthusiasm.

Having and showing passion, and the energy associated with it, is attractive. It makes you more interesting to employers and to the world at large. You become a little more charismatic.

So, what is your passion?

Other resources for the job seeker

As a job seeker, there are lots of useful techniques to learn or to refresh. From writing a modern CV to wooing at the interview, you’ll find lots of tips in my handy little pocket book.

be passionate
A concise and practical little workbook. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

A concise and practical little work book. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

Find this and my other books on my Amazon page at this link; http://ow.ly/BRSAL

Remember working with a career coach can really help job search. Get in touch at the Facing a mid-career dilemmaemail address below – I offer a free half hour trial session by phone or Skype.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book your free 30 minute, no obligation, trial coaching session with Wendy Smith now at this Link 

Contact Employers Direct

Contact Employers Direct

Contact Employers Direct In Your Job Search

Advice from Wendy Smith; Career Coach and author of The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book – order on Amazon

Here is a tip from my book; The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book; How to Win Jobs and Influence Recruiters.

Contact employers direct in your job search because most vacancies, particularly in the private sector, are never advertised. They are filled by people already known to the employer or known to a contact of the employer. So it is makes sense to make yourself known.

There is no reason you should not contact an employer to find out more about the organization and to ask about opportunities. If an employer can fill a job without advertising, it saves them time and cost.

Even if they don’t have vacancies right now and you make a good impression, they are likely to think of you in the future.

Making Contact

First, find out as much as you can about the organization before you write. Identify a suitable senior manager or professional and address your letter to them. Look for someone in a position of influence but outside HR. A direct approach to a senior executive in the department you want to work in is usually more successful.

Tailor your letter carefully to show your interest in the organization; tell them why you would like to work with them. Show how what you have to offer might meet their needs. Ask for an opportunity to talk to them to learn more about the organization and future opportunities. Offer to send your CV.

Keep your letter simple, straight forward, polite and on one sheet. Check it very carefully for accuracy and typos.

If you have done your research and show a real interest in the organization and how you can add value, a direct contact can be very successful.

Other resources for the job seeker

As a job seeker, there are lots of useful techniques to learn or to refresh. From writing a modern CV to wooing at the interview, you’ll find lots of tips in my handy little pocket book.

Contact employers direct
A concise and practical little workbook. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

A concise and practical little work book. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

Find this and my other books on my Amazon page at this link; http://ow.ly/BRSAL

Remember working with a career coach can really help job search. Get in touch at the Facing a mid-career dilemmaemail address below – I offer a free half hour trial session by phone or Skype.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book your free 30 minute, no obligation, trial coaching session with Wendy Smith now at this Link 

Providing References in Job Search

Providing References in Job Search

Advice from Wendy Smith; Career Coach and author of The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book – order on Amazon

Providing References in Job search – here is more advice from The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book.

Recruiters usually ask for references when you apply for a job. And many job seekers feel uncomfortable about approaching potential referees. You shouldn’t feel embarrassed though. Most people feel flattered when asked, but you should give them the opportunity to say no. Tell them you will understand if they feel they simply don’t know you well enough to help.

Here are my top tips for providing references in job search successfully.

  • Don’t add referees to your CV. When providing references, list them on a separate piece of paper if they are asked for by the recruiter.
  • Provide at least three. If the recruiter doesn’t specify how many are required, give three with clear contact information. Contact details should include name, role, organization, postal address, email and telephone number.
  • Include professional connections who will say things that support how well you are qualified for the job. You could include employers, colleagues and customers from earlier jobs. Also people you have worked with as a volunteer, or studied with like teachers and lecturers.
  • Short on professional references? Include a personal reference who can attest to your character and abilities.
  • Your present employer. If your present employer doesn’t know you are applying, don’t give their name at an early stage. If you are successful you will probably be asked to give their details later. Have care when you tell your present employer you are applying elsewhere and show them how you aim to support your current work before any move.
  • Ask permission. Always ask permission before you give someone’s name and tell them about any vacancy where you have mentioned them.
  • Remind your referees how good you are. I usually suggest people explain the vacancy to their referees and remind them why they think it is a good fit.
  • Are you in the public sector? Many public sector organizations will only offer bland references as your employer. When it arrives their reference may only be a statement that you worked for them in a particular grade or role over a particular time. Most large private sector employers know this but for others you may have to explain. You will usually need to give something more. Try asking your line manager or someone in your management line, if they would be ready to give you a personal reference as well as the one sent officially by HR. Many managers are more ready than you expect to help. Also consider approaching retired senior colleagues and others who have left the organization. You might also consider asking for a personal reference from someone who holds a senior position in the private sector. This is where people you have met during work in a voluntary capacity may be useful. Otherwise, consider people you have met through clubs and associations.
  • Say thank you. It is courteous thank your referees and let them know the outcome of your application. Who knows, if you are unsuccessful, they may be only too happy to let you know about a vacancy they just heard about.”

This is advice from my book; The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book, How to Win Jobs and Influence Recruiters.

Other resources for the job seeker

As a job seeker, there are lots of useful techniques to learn or to refresh. From writing a modern CV to wooing at the interview, you’ll find lots of tips in my handy little pocket book.

Providing References in Job Search
A concise and practical little workbook. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

A concise and practical little workbook. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

Find this and my other books on my Amazon page at this link; http://ow.ly/BRSAL

Remember working with a career coach can really help job search. Get in touch at the Facing a mid-career dilemmaemail address below – I offer a free half hour trial session by phone or Skype.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book your free 30 minute, no obligation, trial coaching session with Wendy Smith now at this Link