Get on with the interview panel

Get on with the interview panel

How to get on with the interview panel – most job searches mean you have to deal with panel interviews.  Many large employers use panel interviewing as a part of their recruitment process.  It means a number of different people can be involved in the decision-making process.  They can be from different parts of the organization with an interest in the role. This gives a range of perspectives. Job interviews conducted by a panel are seen to be fair. There are seen as valid because a number of different opinions and views are taken into account..

Usually, each panel member will take turns to ask questions about your fitness for the role; your background, experience and interests.  It can be difficult to build rapport with each panel member . And sometimes, unfortunately, there might be one panel member that you find it particularly difficult to get on with.  This can happen at an interview, just as it can in other parts of your life.

Get on with the interview panel – tips

    • Knowing who the panel members are beforehand is a great help.  If you can, research people on the internet using LinkedIn, for example!  If this is not possible, use your knowledge of the company and the position to prepare to respond to questions from different parts of the organization. These could be human resources, line management, technical and finance.
    • Your introduction is important to creating the right first impression. This is a good opportunity to connect with each panel member on a personal level before the interview questions begin. Make initial eye contact with each panel member. Try to respond warmly and with interest.

When the questions start, listen carefully to what is being asked

  • When the questions start, listen carefully to what is being asked and don’t be afraid to ask for clarification. Make sure you understand correctly.  It is important to answer the question that has been asked.
  • Make initial eye contact with the person who asked the question. And then include the other panel members in your answer. Scan from one face to the next, pausing briefly on each. Focus on speaking to each individual As you finish your answer, return your focus to the person who asked the interview question. Stay calm and answer each question thoroughly.

Keep it pleasant

  • If you do get into a discussion, or you are asked to consider an alternative point of view, again stay calm. Do not expect to be successful if you let anger or annoyance show. Take time to respond with a considered view. Watch your body language. You can show frustration without saying a word.
  • If there is someone on the panel that you really cannot get on with, then don’t ignore how they make you feel and why.  Is that person to be your immediate boss in the new organization, or someone further up the line to whom you will report? Think seriously about whether the role is right for you.  Do this even if you are successful and it is a generous offer. I have worked with a number of clients who sensed at interview that all was not well. They ignored those feelings, only to have regrets later.

With the right preparation and approach, I hope you will get on well with all the members of any interview panel that you meet. If you need advice, get in touch.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

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Fed-up with Job Search

Fed-up with Job Search

“I am unemployed and bored. I’m tired of applying for jobs and not getting any replies!”

Fed-up with Job Search – I heard from someone recently who is getting very tired Fed-up with Job Searchof the whole process of applying for work. He wants to work. But he is really fed up of making applications that don’t get replies. He is bored staying at home every day.

His routine is now to stay up late watching television and get up at noon the next day. Then he just hangs around the house.

It is all too easy for this to happen when you don’t have a regular routine. On top of that, constant rejection, or worse the feeling that you are invisible, adds to feeling down. Eventually it can lead to depression.

The slippery slope

My friend may need quite an intervention to get him moving again.

What about you?  Do you feel yourself slipping down into the well of despair? You need to act!

First, you need to establish a new and healthier routine.

Go to bed and get up at the same times as you did when you had a job. This doesn’t apply to those who had a long commute, obviously. If you can, stick with your previous sleeping pattern. Not sleeping? Talk to your pharmacist about trying a gentle herbal remedy to help with sleep.  If that doesn’t work talk to your medical adviser.

Fed-up with job search – now is time for a new routine

Make a new routine for yourself during the day and set some new goals.

How about going to the gym or taking a long walk first thing in the morning? During the day take pride in eating well but healthily.

Allocate a certain period each day for work at home on your job search but please don’t spend all day, every day on it! Make time for a hobby that has nothing to do with your job search. Make it something you really enjoy.

Now is the time to review and refresh your job search material, CV etc.  Could this be the time to widen your job search field?  Think about things you have enjoyed over the years. What have you not yet considered as a work opportunity?

If you have got to interview stage in any of your applications, what feedback were you given?  If you didn’t ask for feedback, there may still time to make a phone call to the recruiting manager.

Meeting people

Don’t forget to meet up with friends or contacts outside the house. Make a point of getting out and meeting people at least once a week. These meetings won’t be to ask for work but you can let them know that you are looking. Mainly this will be an opportunity to keep up with people and find out what is going on around you.

If you belong to a professional association, now is the time to go to meetings! It is important to keep up with what is going on in your field.  Make some time during your days at home to follow up developments on the internet. It is much cheaper than buying magazines.

Think as well about investing in a training course; either to refresh your present skills or to gain new ones. It could make you more valuable and give you some new contacts.

Think about taking on a voluntary role.  It is very good for self esteem and it helps to be able to show potential employers that you are using your time productively.

Fed-up with job search – now is not the time to brood or become that couch potato. Get up, review, revise, refresh and get out there!  Set yourself some new goals and move forward, there are still opportunities around – it is time to look for them in some new places.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

Job Search: The Keys To Success

Job Search: The Keys To Success

Job search – over the last couple of years I’ve worked with a number of clients who have been very successful in their job searches.

Here is what I think the common job search factors have been.

  1. You are more likely to get a job if you have solid evidence you can do the kind of job searchwork you seek.  Don’t think you can bluff your way through in this climate. If you do get lucky and find yourself appointed you and then can’t do the work, you are likely to be sent on your way pretty quickly. This will make job search harder next time. The sad fact in the present market is that few employers are likely to give you more than induction training at best. Use the time you spend without work to refresh your knowledge and gain qualifications if you need them.
  2. Being able to build relationships pays dividends. Yes, we can talk about networking all day – I often do.  But here I’m talking about learning to build rapport and establish relationships quickly with recruiters and potential new employers. If it doesn’t come naturally then go and work on your communication and relationship building skills.
  3. Successful job seekers do their homework; they research the market and keep up to date with new developments. They know who the key players are and what the culture is like in the organisations they want to target.
  4. Be ready to prepare. Successful job seekers prepare thoroughly at each stage in the process. They leave as little as possible to chance, work on being confident and practice their presentations and their interview technique.
  5. Above all, successful job seekers work hard to keep up energy and motivation. This means looking after themselves physically with diet and exercise.  Also keeping themselves mentally alert and interested in what is going on around them. This may be tough but you need to make a commitment to staying positive despite the inevitable set-backs. The energy and positive approach that you project at interview can make a real difference to your likelihood of success. 

You can do all these things on your own.  Though, as you would expect, I think it is much easier with the support of a career coach. If there is anything I can do to help you please get in touch.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

 

Re-applying for your own job

Re-applying for your own job

Re-applying for your own job – far too many organisations now are asking their Re-applying for your own jobstaff to do this  Sometimes, this is because there has been re-organisation after, say, a merger.   And quite often it seems to happen during downsizing on the pretext of re-organisation. Whatever the reason, it usually causes anger, frustration and just plain fear among employees. It is certainly not the best way to keep up morale.

If it is your job on the line, how do you go about surviving the storm?

Well, first, telling the company exactly what you think of what they are doing isn’t going to help your application. Instead, it is better to vent in private with someone who you really trust.  While at work try to stay positive to make the best of a difficult situation.

Don’t make assumptions about your value to the organization. Now is the time to prove your worth.  Don’t assume that all the good things you have contributed have been registered; you need to make sure you get them on the record.

Recognise the reality of the situation

Your job is on the line and you are in competition. Do not start to play dirty tricks. But do recognise that in this kind of climate others might feel free to do so. Keep your wits about you while still trying to be a good team player. (Nobody said this was easy).

Work on polishing up your CV/resume to show the value you have added and the contribution you have delivered. Quantify your results and include hard facts about delivery.  Make sure you show your competence and contribution fully.

Target you CV to the job as it will be, just as you would when applying from outside the organization.  If you need to offer a cover letter make sure you enthuse about future possibilities – don’t be tempted to whine.  If it is a completely new role show how your skills are transferable and say why you want that role in particular even if it is the only one available. Show how you can meet their needs.

It may be hard to do but work on your relationship with managers who are going to be part of the future organization.

At the end of the day, if you can’t come to terms with this all this,  it might be better to move on. It might be time to seek new opportunities in a new organization. But even If you decide to leave, it is still in your long-term interest to stay on good terms with your managers.

Sorry, this isn’t the pleasantest topic to think about! Some of the advice above may be uncomfortable.  You have to make your own judgement about just how important having this job is to you and how far you are prepared to go to stay around.

If you need support in this or a similar situation please get in touch.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

Job Search Strategy: Who do you want to be?

Job Search Branding: Knowing Who You Are

Job search branding is an important part of your job search strategy. Having a clear brand/identity is important in job search. Here Wendy Smith, our principal coach, provides some advice.

When looking for work, it is important to think about Job Search Brandinghow you wish to appear to potential employers. “Branding yourself” sounds crude but it is a key part of job search. You need to think about the needs of your target audience and what you want them to know about you.

What is your story?

You have a unique story to tell and that story is what makes your brand authentic. Of course others can relate to your story because it may be similar, but it is never exactly the same. Each story is unique. Focus on those things that make you unique and capitalise on them. Perhaps the particular talents and experience that got you into your most recent role are those you need to focus on. But remember, times, and employer’s needs, do change. At the end of the day though, it is your character and story that will be compelling and mark you out from others.

What do you want to be known for?

Having an answer to this question defines what your target audience can expect from your contribution. Remember, this statement is NOT your title! It is also not your personal mission or life purpose. It is a memorable one to two sentence statement that shows the employer who you are and how you will meet their needs. Keep it focused on results and make it memorable.

If you need help preparing your job search branding, please get in touch. Remember, we offer a trial free half hour coaching session by phone or Skype.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

 

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

Wednesday Quotes Inspire Your Job Search

Wednesday Quotes Inspire Your Job Search Wednesday quotes

Our Wednesday quotes really will inspire and motivate you job search

Wednesday quotes to energise!

  • Whenever you are asked if you can do a job, tell ‘em, ‘Certainly I can!’ Then get busy and find out how to do it. Theodore Roosevelt
  • Our work is the presentation of our capabilities. Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
  • Never give up. No matter how many times you tried, or how many times you failed, always keep trying and always believe. Author Unknown
  • Each time we face a fear, we gain strength, courage, and confidence in the doing. Author Unknown
  • Success comes from taking the initiative and following up… persisting… What simple action could you take today to produce a new momentum toward success in your life? Tony Robbins
  • One important key to success is self-confidence. An important key to self-confidence is preparation. Arthur Ashe

    You’re braver than you believe, and stronger than you seem, and smarter than you think. Christopher Robin

  • One of the best things you can do when the world is storming around you is to pause. Mitch Thrower
  • Good luck happens when preparedness meets opportunity  Bret Harte
  • Our greatest weakness lies in giving up. The most certain way to succeed is always to try just one more time.  Thomas A. Edison
  • Do not let what you cannot do interfere with what you can do. John Wooden
  • Believe in yourself and all that you are. Know that there is something inside you that is greater than any obstacle. Christian D. Larson
  • “Take risks: if you win, you will be happy; if you lose, you will be wise.  Author Unknown
  • Many of life’s failures are people who did not realise how close they were to success when they gave up. Thomas Edison
  • Take the first step in faith. You don’t have to see the whole staircase, just take the first step. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

Your Personal Brand Checklist

Your Personal Brand Checklist

Your personal brand checklist will ensure the world sees you as you wish. It will help you reflect your personal brand in all you do. Everything, from the comments you make on Twitter to the way you dress, strengthens or weakens the way the you are seen! Here is your personal brand checklist.

personal brand checklist
Your checklist
  1. Are you sure people believe you know what you are talking about? First of all, does your resume reflect the real depth of your experience – is it up to date? Do the words you use at work reflect the latest thinking on your subject at this point in time? Do you write articles and blog posts on your specialist interest?

What about your “elevator speech”?

2. Can you deliver a succinct description of what you do, how you do it differently, plus the benefit it delivers? Can you say your piece within the time that it takes an elevator to travel one floor?

3. Are you a convincing communicator? Do people believe what you say? Can you influence people? Why not do a market survey? So, you could choose three people you trust and ask them what they think!  Why not, read a book about it, take a class or work with a coach like me.

4. Do you dress for the job at work? Because you do need to know the dress code for your sector? And you would be wise to follow it for success. But what about off duty? If you met you boss in the supermarket, what impression would they get? Think about what is appropriate to the situation. And balance your individual style with clothing that will appeal to those you are trying to impress.

Do you know how to behave at work?

5. By that I mean the etiquette for your organisation and your sector? What kind of business cards do people carry? Most of all, always be courteous. Therefore, always be the one who follows up and says thank you after a kind deed. Remember to do it after sector and professional events.

6. Do you know the people you need to impress? Take time out to build your address book. Collect business cards – make sure yours reflects your image properly! When you have built your relationship, ask contacts for further introductions. Use LinkedIn to find new people.

How often do you nurture your network?

7. Are you working at nurturing your relationships with your contacts? Most of all, are you showing an active interest and do you genuinely care care about them? Ask how they are and what they are doing. But make sure you mean it.  Remember things they tell you – note them down if you need to!

8. What do you do with your spare time? Do you give something back to the community with voluntary work? Or perhaps you help your local sports club? You don’t need to brag about it; news does get around!

Your personal brand is precious. It’s the you the world sees and judges by. Nurture your brand and you will nurture both your life and your career.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

Job Search – Verbal Skills Important

Job Search – Verbal Skills Are Important

Job search requires you to demonstrate your communication skills. And verbal skills are the most important of the communication skills. This means successful job search is more likely if you can speak clearly, concisely and fluently. A new survey has shown that employers identify strong verbal skills more than written, visual, or electronic communication skills. So such skills are essential.verbal communication

Verbal skills in the study included interpersonal communication, presenting and listening skills. This was as well as team or group work.

Electronic skills, while growing in importance, ranked second in the study. Visual communication skills were rarely mentioned, although body language is important when you wish to influence others.

Students enrolled in a business communication course in the US had been asked to contact potential employers in their fields of interest. They requested information about important communication skills in those fields.

The employers identified 165 different communication skills for job search. The result appeared in  Business and Professional Communication Quarterly. But you can read more about the study in non-technical language at this link.

Lack of confidence sometimes inhibits the ability to speak fluently. Working with a coach can help you learn to express yourself more clearly and with confidence.

Meanwhile I wish you every success in your job search. If you would like some help, please get in touch.

Wendy Smith is a career, life and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can book a discussion with Wendy about your coaching needs and your personal development at this link

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

Job Search – Planning Your Day

Job Search – Planning Your Day

Wendy Smith is a Career, Life and Business Coach and Life Coach helping helping clients improve quality of life as well as being successful at work and at home.

I advise my unemployed job search clients to treat job seeking as a full time occupation. They need a job search timetable for their working day. Sometimes, this can be quite hard to come to terms with, particularly if you are in a partnership with childcare responsibilities. Being the one at home is often seen as an opportunity for you to take more responsibility for domestic chores, picking up the kids from school etc. But successful job search does require a big investment of your time.

Establish your new job search routine

If you are used to working “conventional” office hours then those are the hours I would recommend you commit to looking for work. Establish a new working routine within those hours. In broad terms you have five main tasks,

  • Making yourself a good candidate
  • Finding opportunities
  • Applying for them
  • Going through the recruitment process
  • Maintaining your confidence and self belief

Recognising these five tasks can help you to think through how to structure your time effectively.

You should, for example, spend at least part of each day checking for new vacancies. That is better done fairly early in the day. It is wise to spend at least part of the day managing your networking campaign – identifying possibilities, preparing to talk to people etc. You might want to dedicate a particular day, or days, in the week for meeting people to save on travel expenses etc.

Spend part of each day on research and learning. Read everything you can get

timetable for job search
Important but keep it flexible

your hands on about job search in the current market and what recruiters are saying on sites like LinkedIn. Not all advice will be wise, nor will it all apply to you, but, it is all worth at least scanning for new tips.

Research your sector thoroughly, the very latest developments and who the key players are. When you have a vacancy in sight, thoroughly research the organisation and their senior people.

If you have some money to invest, then think about using it to update your skills or for coaching to give you the edge in a competitive market.

Keep in mind

Remember that staying healthy and confident matters too. Take some time each day to exercise and to get some fresh air.

Work on recognising your own competence and remembering the successes you have had already. That isn’t only so that you can tell your success stories to potential employers. They are also a great boost to your self-confidence.

With commitment and organisation, your job search is far more likely to be a success.

If you need help preparing your job search strategy, please get in touch. Remember I offer a trial free half hour coaching session by phone or Skype.

I wish all those starting out on, or a continuing, a job search right now every success and if I can help, please get in touch.

Wendy Smith is a career, life and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with the life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact Wendy at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com or find out more hereWendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

How to Become Your Resume

How to Become Your Resume

Your resume! On paper, you’re the perfect candidate. So, how do you make the same impression in person?

Here is some advice. For example:

Divide your time on a two-to-one ratio. For every hour you spend on the mechanics of interview preparation, researching the company, your route and means of travel, wardrobe preparation, etc., spend two hours with your resume and preparing for questions.

Read more at this link