Job Search – Top Ten Job Search And Social Media Questions

Job Search – Top Ten Job Search And Social Media Questions

Help for those struggling with job search and  incorporating social media into their job search.

Great advice from the Discovering Social community which is designed to help those struggling with incorporating social media into their job search or every day lives. It is a series of webinars, resources and events focused on showing the how-to of social media.

Good luck with your job search and get in touch with me if you would like more information about how to succeed.

Wendy Smith is a  Life Coach helping you find fresh perspectives on your life including your career. She helps people lead happier lives and feel more fulfilled. Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book a FREE coaching session with Wendy or find out more at this link

You can find Wendy’s books on Amazon at this link

Using LinkedIn for Job Search

Using LinkedIn for Job Search

Job Search: How to find a new job using LinkedIn!

Using LinkedIn for Job Search – LinkedIn is a powerful business networking tool but it can also be one of the best ways to find a new job.

Unfortunately, not many people know how to really tap into its power.  But this little video gives simple but useful tips for how you can use your LinkedIn network to search for a new job.

It is from http://www.explania.com/en/channels/work/detail/how-to-find-a-new-job-using-linkedin

If there is advice you would like or if you have questions about your job search, please get in touch!

Wendy Mason is the Happiness Coach and author of a new novel, The Wolf Project Wendy is a life and career coach and writer. She is passionate about helping people find happiness at work and at home! She helps people reach their goals and aspirations, without sacrificing their home and personal life.  She believes coaching requires compassion, warmth and empathy. Wendy helps people reach their career goals and aspirations, without sacrificing their home and personal life. You can contact Wendy at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com and find out more at http://wisewolfcoaching.com

CV review and interview preparation a speciality

  • Refresh Your Job Search In 2013
  • Job Search – Standing Out From the Crowd
  • Job Search – Getting On With The Interview Panel

Job Search: How to find a new job using LinkedIn!

Job Search: How to find a new job using LinkedIn!

LinkedIn is a powerful business networking tool but it can also be one of the best ways to find a new job.

Unfortunately, not many people know how to really tap into its power.  But this little video gives simple but useful tips for how you can use your LinkedIn network to search for a new job.

It is from http://www.explania.com/en/channels/work/detail/how-to-find-a-new-job-using-linkedin

If there is advice you would like or if you have questions about your job search, please get in touch!

Wendy Mason is the Happiness Coach and author of a new novel, The Wolf Project Wendy is a life and career coach and writer. She is passionate about helping people find happiness at work and at home! She helps people reach their goals and aspirations, without sacrificing their home and personal life.  She believes coaching requires compassion, warmth and empathy. Wendy helps people reach their career goals and aspirations, without sacrificing their home and personal life. You can contact Wendy at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com and find out more at http://wisewolfcoaching.com

CV review and interview preparation a speciality

  • Refresh Your Job Search In 2013
  • Job Search – Standing Out From the Crowd
  • Job Search – Getting On With The Interview Panel

Job Search: How To Add Value To Your CV And Make It Jump Out From The Pile

Add Value To Your CV

Job Search: How To Add Value To Your CV And Make It Jump Out From The Pile

We all know that recruiters find themselves faced with piles of CVs/Resumes to sift.  How do you make your CV jump out of the pile and on to the desk as selected for interview. Well, when you write your it,  it helps to keep in mind why you are doing it.

At its most basic, A CV is a short list of facts about you and your work history, skills, qualifications and experience. A good CV is essential when looking for work and it is worth spending time getting it right. It needs to show you as valuable to any potential employer.

So what will a recruiter be looking for?

Well certainly your CV should:

  • Be neat, certainly typed, without typos, and to the best standard you can achieve in content and layout
  • Be short, 2 sides of a sheet of A4 paper is usually enough
  • Be positive, it should emphasize your achievements, strengths, successes
  • Make a good impression. This means presenting the facts about you in a positive way.

I hope you are going to

  • Send your CV with a covering letter or email asking companies if they have any current or future vacancies.
  • Send your CV when applying for advertised vacancies
  • Use your CV to help you remember all the dates and information you need each time you need to fill in an application form.
  • Use it to jog your memory when applying for jobs by phone – it can help if you are asked to give more information about previous jobs.
  • Have your CV with you while you’re waiting to be called in to an interview to help refresh your memory.
  • You can also leave a copy with the interviewer if they do not already have one!

Sometimes recruitment agencies ask to see your CV before you can register with them.

So your CV is a way of letting a potential employer know just what value they will get if they employ you. This should be you marketing the most valuable product you have – yourself! Therefore it is going to be much more than just a list of roles.

For each role you do include, you need to show how in that role you added value.

When you have done that you can then lay claim to the associated competencies.

For example, if you led a team;

  • Why did they exist
  • Where did you lead them
  • What did they achieve as a result of your leadership?
  • What was your contribution and what hurdles did you have to overcome
  • What value was delivered?

How does that information provide evidence to support your claim to the competence of leadership?

STAR stories make you a star

Remember  STAR stories – for each one you include your job title and how long you were employed in the role, then set out briefly;

Situation – Describe the situation/problem you were faced with
Task – what did you have to do?
Action – what action did you take and why.
Results – highlight the outcome and the value delivered

Use a summary of your STAR stories to add value to your CV and show how you will add value for any new employer!

Meanwhile if there is advice you would like or questions you would like answered, please get in touch!

Wendy Mason is the Happiness Coach and author of a new novel, The Wolf Project Wendy is a life and career coach and writer. She is passionate about helping people find happiness at work and at home! She helps people reach their goals and aspirations, without sacrificing their home and personal life.  She believes coaching requires compassion, warmth and empathy. Wendy helps people reach their career goals and aspirations, without sacrificing their home and personal life. You can contact Wendy at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com and find out more at http://wisewolfcoaching.com

CV review and interview preparation a speciality

  • Refresh Your Job Search In 2013
  • Job Search – Standing Out From the Crowd
  • Job Search – Getting On With The Interview Panel

How to Make a Job Search Plan

Job Search Plan
job hunting (Photo credit: Robert S. Donovan)

Job Hunting Tips : How to Make a Job Search Plan

Job Search Plan! You’ve got to have a plan to find a job.  Here are tips for beginning your job search with a plan in this video clip from professional job consultant, Tine Buechler.


If you need support in your job search, please get in touch.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

Job Hunting Tips : How to Make a Job Search Plan

job hunting
job hunting (Photo credit: Robert S. Donovan)

Job Hunting Tips : How to Make a Job Search Plan

You’ve got to have a plan to find a job.  Here are tips for beginning your job search with a plan in this video clip from professional job consultant, Tine Buechler.


If you need support in your job search, please get in touch.

Wendy Mason is the Happiness Coach and author of a new novel, The Wolf Project Wendy is a life and career coach and writer. She is passionate about helping people find happiness at work and at home! She helps people reach their goals and aspirations, without sacrificing their home and personal life.  She believes coaching requires compassion, warmth and empathy. Wendy helps people reach their career goals and aspirations, without sacrificing their home and personal life. You can contact Wendy at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com and find out more at http://wisewolfcoaching.com

CV review and interview preparation a speciality

  • Refresh Your Job Search In 2013
  • Job Search – Standing Out From the Crowd
  • Job Search – Getting On With The Interview Panel

Job Search Basics – How A Google Search Can Help

Job Search Basics – How A Google Search Can Help

Job Search Basics – One of the best ways to find jobs online is to conduct a local job search using Google. You can find all sorts of jobs including data entry jobs, typist jobs, government jobs and online computer jobs (these are some of the most commonly searched job vacancies using a search engine like Google).

But many online job searches end up with too many search results to browse through. One of the most efficient ways to find a job online without visiting many online job sites is to narrow down your online jobs search using a search engine.

This video demonstrates a simple, but very effective, way of doing just that.

If you want to find out more ways to save time and effort in carrying out your Job Search activities, just visit http://www.GetMeOffTheDole.com, and you will find a wealth of other valuable information. Once there, don’t forget to try out the dedicated Job Search Engine.

Wendy Mason is the Happiness Coach and author of a new novel, The Wolf Project.  Wendy is a life and career coach and writer. She is passionate about helping people find happiness at work and at home! She helps people reach their goals and aspirations, without sacrificing their home and personal life.  She believes coaching requires compassion, warmth and empathy. Wendy helps people reach their career goals and aspirations, without sacrificing their home and personal life. You can contact Wendy at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com and find out more at http://wisewolfcoaching.com

Useful articles

Job Search – Getting On With The Interview Panel

Job Search – Getting On With The Interview Panel

Most job searches mean you have to deal with panel interviews.  Many large employers will want to use panel interviewing as a part of their recruitment process.  It means a number of different people can be involved in the decision-making process.  They can be from different parts of the organization with an interest in the role and can give a range of perspectives.  Job interviews conducted by a panel are seen to be fair and valid because a number of different opinions and views are taken into account in making a decision.

Usually, each panel member will take turns to ask questions about your fitness for the role; your background, experience and interests.  It can be difficult to build rapport with each panel member during the interview. And sometimes, unfortunately, there might be one panel member that you find it particularly difficult to get on with.  This can happen at an interview, just as it can in other parts of your life.

Tips to help you build rapport with the interviewing panel.

  1. Knowing who the panel members are beforehand is a great help.  If you can, research people on the internet using LinkedIn, for example!  If this is not possible, use your knowledge of the company and the position to prepare to respond to questions from different parts of the organization such as human resources, line management, technical and finance.
  2. Your introduction is important to creating the right first impression. This is a good opportunity to connect with each panel member on a personal level before the interview questions begin. Make initial eye contact with each panel member and try to respond warmly and with interest.
  3. When the questions start, listen carefully to what is being asked and don’t be afraid to ask for clarifications or to make sure you understand correctly.  It is important to answer the question that has been asked.
  4. Make initial eye contact with the person who asked the question and then include the other panel members in your answer. Scan from one face to the next, pausing briefly on each. Focus on speaking to each individual and then, as you finish your answer, return your focus to the person who asked the interview question. Stay calm and answer each question thoroughly.
  5. If you do get into a discussion or you are asked to consider an alternative point of view, again stay calm. Do not expect to be successful if you let anger or annoyance show. Take time to respond with a considered view. Watch your body language, you can show frustration without saying a word.
  6. If there is someone on the panel that you really cannot get on with, then don’t ignore how they make you feel and why.  If that person is to be your immediate boss in the new organization, or someone further up the line to whom you will report, then think quite seriously about whether the role is right for you.  Do this even if you are successful and it is a generous offer. I have worked with a number of clients who sensed at interview that all was not well but ignored those feelings, only to have regrets later.

With the right preparation and approach, I hope you will get on well with all the members of any interview panel that you meet.

Wendy Mason is a career coach.  She helps people reach their goals and aspirations, without sacrificing their home and personal life.  Before working as a coach, Wendy had a long career in both the public and private sectors in general management and consultancy as well as spells in HR.  She now divides her time between coaching and writing. You can contact Wendy at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com and find out more at http://wisewolfcoaching.com

  • Job Search – What are the most common interview questions? Help from monster.co.uk
  • Job Search – Networking – Asking Friends For Help
  • Outrageous Job Interview Questions
  • Refresh Your Job Search In 2013

Job Search – Standing Out From the Crowd

Job Search – Standing Out From the Crowd

This post is about applying for advertised vacancies for which you are in competition. Unfortunately, in the present climate, job seeking is intensely competitive.  There are usually many applicants for every advertised post.  (That is why finding out through your network of contacts about potential vacancies that are not are advertised, or not likely to be advertised, matters so much.)

When you submit a written application, with or without a CV/Résumé, what matters most is that you show clearly and convincingly how you meet the criteria for the vacancy.  You need to include keywords that will stand out like head lights – you can find out more about job search keywords at this link.

Once you get to the interview stage, it is reasonable to assume that all those others who are being interviewed at the same time, have also demonstrated that on paper they meet the requirements.  Yes, you can assume that the interview and following up your references will be used as opportunities to test whether what you have said on paper in valid.  But at the interview stage you want to stand out from the crowd.

Now, standing out from the crowd is not without its risks.  And you need to take into account the culture of the organization when deciding how to make your mark.  When deciding what to wear for the interview, for example, knowing the company dress code is important.  If it is casual then make sure that you wear very smart casual attire.  No, you don’t want be so bland that you sink into the wall paper. Wearing, for example, a smart but distinctive tie, scarf or piece of jewelry, can help the interviewers to remember you.  The “something distinctive “needs to be chosen with great care and very good taste!

The interview is also an opportunity to show clearly that you will bring added value beyond that required by the job specification.  Again show that added value with care and make sure that what you say is relevant to the questions that you are being asked and to the job.

You can also stand out by being actively engaged in the process and showing real interest in the organization and in what the interviewers have to say to you.  Make sure that you get a good night’s sleep before the interview, if possible.  Do your best to arrive in plenty of time.  You want to be bright-eyed and relaxed – not red-faced and slightly out of breath. The impression you want to leave is that you are intelligent, highly competent and likely to be an asset to the organization and to your future work colleagues.

You want to be remembered but for all the right reasons.

Wendy Mason is a career coach.  She helps people reach their goals and aspirations, without sacrificing their home and personal life.  Before working as a coach, Wendy had a long career in both the public and private sectors in general management and consultancy as well as spells in HR.  She now divides her time between coaching and writing. You can contact Wendy at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com and find out more at http://wisewolfcoaching.com

Job Search – Six Top Salary Tips

Job Search – Six Top Salary Tips

When you are looking for work there are all kinds of factors to take into account. Many we have covered here before. For the majority of us, the main reason we choose to work is so that we can earn money to support ourselves and our families.

These tips will help you get paid the salary you deserve and then help you to look after your money.

  1. What are you worth?

    Work out what your value should be to an employer. Research what other people with your skills and experience are earning and use that information to backup your salary negotiation. The same role can pay differently in different sectors and in different parts of the country so take that into account in making your calculations.

  2.  Learn to negotiate

    You will find lots of tips on negotiating on line. You are in a much more powerful position before you accept a job. Think about the things you have to bargain with and, for example, how scarce your skills are. Use the information you have gathered about what other people are being paid for the same type of work. How far are you prepared to go? Know what will be unacceptable and work out your limits. Be prepared to sit on your hands and wait for a response from your potential employer.

  3. Don’t forget benefits!

    Lots of people do not take into account the real value of benefits when negotiating a salary. If you get stuck on the amount of your salary try negotiating your benefits’ package with your potential employer – it may cost them very little to give you a better benefits’ package but it might make a big difference for you.

  4. Learn to manage your money

    Learn to make the most of what you get paid. If you don’t know about budgeting, then find out and learn to set your self a budget each month. Work hard to stay out of debt and don’t over use those credit cards. Remember loans have to be repaid and there is very little prospect of the economy improving quickly; what is borrowed now might put your future at risk. If you do borrow be careful who you do it from and learn about interest rates. Again use the internet to research money management.

  5. Start saving

    It’s never too early to start saving for the things you might want in the future and even for your retirement. Most large organizations now have to give you access to a pension scheme. Don’t forget that at sometime you might want to buy a house, Saving schemes can be started with quite small amounts.

  6. Think long term

    I’ve mentioned pensions and saving above. But think long term in a broader way. When you are thinking about the salary for a role, don’t just think short term about what you will be paid initially. Think about what the possibilities might be in your chosen field for future earning opportunities. Will your new employer be able to give you access to them. Don’t sacrifice the longer term for a short term win.

    This is just general advice, you should always take advice from a properly qualified financial adviser when planning your financial future.

    Wendy Mason is a career coach.  She helps people reach their goals and aspirations, without sacrificing their home and personal life.  Before working as a coach, Wendy had a long career in both the public and private sectors in general management and consultancy as well as spells in HR.  She now divides her time between coaching and writing. You can contact Wendy at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com and find out more at http://wisewolfcoaching.com

  • Job Search Part 6: Phone Interviews, Group Interviews and Assessment Centres
  • Job Search Part 7: How to negotiate your salary and benefits.