Job Seeking – Conflicting Priorities

Job Seeking – Conflicting Priorities

Wendy Smith; Career Coach and author of The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book – order on Amazon

Job Seeking – Conflicting Priorities – when working with clients looking for a role. I usually ask them to work out a basic budget which covers how much money they would need to feed and house themselves and those who depend upon them. I ask them then to consider what resources and options are available to them to meet their financial commitments. Is there enough? If not, then earning more money quickly becomes the top priority. This might mean taking a part time or interim role in the short-term while they work on their career aspirations outside work.

But these conditions do not provide the optimum for successful job search.

Job Seeking – Conflicting Priorities – Looking for work is best treated as a full-time occupation

Looking for work is best treated as a full-time occupation. And it needs to be at the top of your agenda. Sometimes even for those with enough financial resources can find this a challenge. While friends and family accept the priority you give to your job when you are in work, they are less likely to accept that you have the same level of commitment to looking for a job.

“Why can’t you come along to support my charity event now you are at home all day?”

But if you want to have the best chance of finding that special new job that is just right for you, or even one close to it, taking time out to please friends and family may not be your best choice.

If you do have to compromise make sure it is for the very best of reasons. Yes, that does include your kids’ sports’ day. But recognise that anything less than top billing for your job search gives you a lesser chance of successful job search.

I wish all those starting out on or a continuing a job search every success. Remember working with a career coach can aid your job search success. If you have been out of the job market for a while, there will be new techniques to learn and some you need to refresh. From writing a modern CV to wooing them at the interview, you’ll find lots of tips on this blog, Try this link.”

Job Seeking - Conflicting Priorities
A concise and practical little workbook. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

You can find more help for your job search in the “The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book: How to Win Jobs and Influence Recruiters.” Find this and my other books on my Amazon page at this link; http://ow.ly/BRSAL .

Working with a coach really can help you find job search success. Get in touch at the Facing a mid-career dilemmaemail address below – I offer a free half hour trial session by phone or Skype.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

 

The Job Interviewer’s Perspective

The Job Interviewer’s Perspective

 The Job Interviewer’s Perspective – a view from the other side of the table

I’ve spent a fair amount of time being interviewed but I’ve spent a lot more time on the other side of the table. As a civil servant I sat on old style promotion boards for very large departments. Sometimes that meant two and, occasionally, three weeks interviewing from nine in the morning until 5.30 at night. More recently, I’ve also done my fair share of recruitment interviewing and interviewing people on promotion to particular jobs. The experience has been enlightening.

I’ve learned for example that it isn’t only the candidates who need to prepare for the interview. Of course, like candidates, not all interviewers do prepare. But it wise to do so if you and your organization are likely to suffer the consequences of a poor decision.

The Job Interviewer’s Perspective – Performance Nerves

I didn’t expect so many interviewers to suffer from performance nerves before the interviews. Most interviewers are concerned to do a good a job and no one wants to look incompetent to candidates or fellow interviewers.

There is a unique internal dynamic to each interviewing panel. If the panel, and the candidates, are lucky there is an experienced panel chair who knows how to get the interviewers working together as a team. Chairing a panel requires leadership and management skills. Sadly, of course, many panels don’t have the benefit of good leadership. Individual panel members come to the interview with their own perspective on what is required. Good leadership means achieving a common view. It is almost inevitable though that there will be some differences of opinion.

What is it that marks someone out as special?

So, now, there you sit, having had a discussion with your fellow interviewers about the competencies required for this role and how you will test them. In comes the first candidate and you get to work. What is it that marks someone out as special?

Well, if you ask the right questions, you’ll have the facts you need about competence. But there is something else. What you remember afterwards are the candidates who engaged with you and showed a real interest in the work and the organization. And, of course, they had done their homework. If you are serious about being good interviewer, you prepare for the interview, so, naturally, you expect the candidates to show that they have done the same.

I wish all those starting out on or a continuing a job search this week every success.

Working with a coach really can help you prepare for an interview. Get in touch at the Facing a mid-career dilemmaemail address below – I offer a free half hour trial session by phone or Skype.
Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

Job Search Tips

Job Search Tips

Job Search Tips to Help You Stand Out

Wendy Smith; Career Coach and author of The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book – order on Amazon

Job Search Tips – applying for work? Here are some tips to help!

1. Read the job description. Oh so many people don’t do this. Or, they don’t do it with enough care. When you have read it decide carefully whether you can actually do the job before you apply.
2. Accept the gift of Key Words. Incorporate Key Words used in the job description into your resume and cover letter so that you make the right bells ring. But, again, do it with care – sprinkle rather than bombard.
3. Talk about what you have accomplished. Do this in your resume and during the interview. Illustrate answers with your achievements. Show how you can do the same good job for the potential employer.
4. Create your resume first even when filling in an online application form – then you can cut and post from it. Please check it very carefully for typos.
5. Research, research, research; the company, the people (you can used LinkedIn) and the position. If you are called for an interview, you need to able to show you understand what they are about and what they need.
6. Prepare, prepare, and prepare for the interview. Have a battery of descriptions of what you have achieved, and how, lined up to show how you fit their needs. Think through your attitude to past employers and emphasise the positive – never be tempted to be critical – they’ll worry you will do the same to them.
7. Remember your manners and send a thank you email afterwards offering more information if they need it. The thank you note may be the thing that marks you out if they are wavering.

You can find more help for your job search in the “The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book: How to Win Jobs and Influence Recruiters.” Find this and my other books on my Amazon page at this link; http://ow.ly/BRSAL .

Working with a coach really can help you find job search success. Get in touch at the Facing a mid-career dilemmaemail address below – I offer a free half hour trial session by phone or Skype.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com