Recruiting good people

Recruiting good people

Recruiting good people – recruiting the right people is crucial in ensuring your organization is successful.  It depends on you carrying out a number of activities.

Analyse the job

  • Analyse the job – make sure you take time to identify the competencies and experience required to do the job the standard you need. If you have an existing employee doing a similar job successfully, think about what they bring to the role
  • Write a job description that reflects what your analysis has established.
  • Create a competency framework for the role that you can send to potential candidates and by which you will judge them.
  • Write a person specification that reflects the competencies and experience required – no more and no less.

Choose the right recruitment approach

  • Choose a recruitment method and a selection procedure right and proportionate to the role. Check out a number of recruitment organizations Recruiting good peopleand ask them for advice  as well as how to create an inviting advertisement.
  • Create an interview plan showing how you will structure and carry out the interviews. It helps to have someone on the panel familiar with the work and someone who can give you an balanced view of candidates
  • Ask questions that will allow a candidate to give evidence of the competencies they have claimed. Ask for concrete examples of how they have solved the kind of problems likely to occur in your job.
  • Be fair, be open-minded and be courteous, when you interview.
  • Be ready for a good candidate to ask you some challenging questions about the work and your organization.

Recruiting the wrong person costs you money and causes disruption in the organization. It can cause low morale. If someone doesn’t really ‘fit’ they may quit very quickly and you will have to recruit all over again.  Or you are left sorting out problems. So, it worth investing in a good recruitment process.

You need a recruitment process that is

  •  EFFICIENT – cost effective
  • EFFECTIVE – attracts enough suitable candidates who are likely to fit into the organization
  • FAIR – stays inside the law in terms of avoiding unlawful discrimination and with decisions made on merit alone.

When you have a vacancy, the first thing you think of is replacing the person. But this is could be a great opportunity to consider whether the work is really needed. Also, how best to get it done. Perhaps it could be shared between existing staff. Does it really need a full-time replacement. What are the opportunities for part-time or flexible working?

I wish you good luck in the finding the right candidate for your role and if you would like some help please get in touch.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

Your CV Summary for Job Search

Your CV Summary for Job Search

CV summary – you would be surprised how many CVs I see that do not include a short personal profile at the top of the first page. Instead they plunge straight into the work history giving the reader not a clue about the person doing the work.These kinds of CV are much less likely to catch a recruiter/future employer’s eye.

So what should you include in your short summary?

Your personal profile should summarise your;
• Skills and qualities
• Work background and achievements
• Career aims.

It should only be a few lines and must grab the reader’s attention. Try to avoid using terms that a lot of candidates will use, such as ‘reliable’, ‘hard working’, ‘team player’, ‘good communication skills’ etc. These general terms are heard so often they don’t help an employer to build up a real picture of you.

Instead, for example, if the job involves working with people, try to highlight relevant, specific people skills such as: negotiating, dealing with demanding customers, presentation skills, resolving conflict, or showing empathy. These help the reader build up more of a picture than saying you’re a good team-worker and an effective communicator. However, be brief – you can highlight examples of your skills in later sections.

Include keywords relevant to the kind of work you seek or are applying for. (When someone uses a search engine, they type in one or more words describing what they are looking for; eg ‘Facilities Manager’ or ‘Corporate Real Estate”. These words or phrases are known as keywords.) Many recruitment companies make use of software to sift job applications based on a keyword search.

When you’re summarising your career aims, think about the employer you are sending your CV to. It will hit home with employers if your career aims sound exactly like the kind of opportunities they currently have or are likely to provide in future.

Try to relate your summary to the job description or, if you’re sending your CV on spec, what you think the employer is looking for.

I wish all those starting out on, or a continuing, a job search this week every success and if I can help, please get in touch.

Remember I offer a trial free half hour coaching session by phone or Skype.

Warm regards

Wendy
wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com
http://wisewolfcoaching.com

  • Job Search – Please Write Those Important STAR Stories
  • Career Development: When it is time for a change!
  • Career Development: When You Have to Reapply For Your Own Job

Job Search: Make sure you include your personal profile/summary in your CV

Job Search: Make sure you include your personal profile/summary in your CV

You would be surprised how many CVs I see that do not include a short personal profile at the top of the first page. Instead they plunge straight into the work history giving the reader not a clue about the person doing the work.These kinds of CV are much less likely to catch a recruiter/future employer’s eye.

So what should you include in your short summary?

Your personal profile should summarise your;
• Skills and qualities
• Work background and achievements
• Career aims.

It should only be a few lines and must grab the reader’s attention. Try to avoid using terms that a lot of candidates will use, such as ‘reliable’, ‘hard working’, ‘team player’, ‘good communication skills’ etc. These general terms are heard so often they don’t help an employer to build up a real picture of you.

Instead, for example, if the job involves working with people, try to highlight relevant, specific people skills such as: negotiating, dealing with demanding customers, presentation skills, resolving conflict, or showing empathy. These help the reader build up more of a picture than saying you’re a good team-worker and an effective communicator. However, be brief – you can highlight examples of your skills in later sections.

Include keywords relevant to the kind of work you seek or are applying for. (When someone uses a search engine, they type in one or more words describing what they are looking for; eg ‘Facilities Manager’ or ‘Corporate Real Estate”. These words or phrases are known as keywords.) Many recruitment companies make use of software to sift job applications based on a keyword search.

When you’re summarising your career aims, think about the employer you are sending your CV to. It will hit home with employers if your career aims sound exactly like the kind of opportunities they currently have or are likely to provide in future.

Try to relate your summary to the job description or, if you’re sending your CV on spec, what you think the employer is looking for.

I wish all those starting out on, or a continuing, a job search this week every success and if I can help, please get in touch.

Remember I offer a trial free half hour coaching session by phone or Skype.

Warm regards

Wendy
wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com
http://wisewolfcoaching.com

  • Job Search – Please Write Those Important STAR Stories
  • Career Development: When it is time for a change!
  • Career Development: When You Have to Reapply For Your Own Job

The Right Company and Job Search

The Right Company and Job Search! Today we have a guest post from Lauren Bailey.  Lauren researches and writes information on the best online colleges and degrees for modern students. She is also a freelance blogger and loves writing about education, new technology, lifestyle and health. She welcomes comments and questions via email at blauren99@gmail.com.

The Most Important Part of a Job Search is Finding the Right Company

I suppose this title is a bit subjective, since the “most important part” of anything depends on who you ask. However, there is one part of looking and interviewing for a job that so many people ignore, or at least don’t pay enough attention to, but that is vital to a successful job search; researching a company or business before applying for a job.

There are so many different types of businesses and organizations in today’s market. At times, you may come across a business that is about something totally The Right Company different than its title would lead you to believe. Job seekers often search for open positions online, where the job title is posted first and the name of the company second. This leads people to believe that the job title is what is most important (and it is key), but the company you choose to work for lays the foundation for a successful career.

A job really is about more than just the task at hand. Your personal values and goals should match the company you work for; otherwise, you may end up sacrificing your contentment and ethics for a paycheck. This is why it is vital to do your research on a company before applying for a job.

Thanks to the internet, this type of research is easier than ever. Most businesses have their own websites (especially if they are posting jobs online), and these sites often contain pages that cover company history, location(s), business operations, management organization and more. Some companies even share information on what they offer their employees, in terms of benefits and career opportunities.

If the job post doesn’t provide you with the company’s official web address, simply enter the company’s name in an internet search engine (like Google) to find its website. If the site doesn’t provide you with all of the information you want, don’t hesitate to call the business to get the answers you are looking for. Calling also gives you the opportunity to connect with someone who already works for the company, giving you a leg up on an interview, should you decide to apply.

If you do apply and get called for an interview, you will also already be prepared for any questions the interviewer might have about your knowledge of the company. In addition, you will have had more time to contemplate any additional questions you want to ask during the interview about the business.

Good luck with your search!

Lauren Bailey researches and writes information on the best online colleges and degrees for modern students. She is also a freelance blogger and loves writing about education, new technology, lifestyle and health. She welcomes comments and questions via email at blauren99@gmail.com.

  • Job Search Part 2:Where are you looking for work?
  • Job Search Part 4: Writing That Winning CV

Job Search – The Most Important Part of a Job Search Is…

Today we have a guest post from Lauren Bailey.  Lauren researches and writes information on the best online colleges and degrees for modern students. She is also a freelance blogger and loves writing about education, new technology, lifestyle and health. She welcomes comments and questions via email at blauren99@gmail.com.

The Most Important Part of a Job Search Is…

I suppose this title is a bit subjective, since the “most important part” of anything depends on who you ask. However, there is one part of looking and interviewing for a job that so many people ignore, or at least don’t pay enough attention to, but that is vital to a successful job search; researching a company or business before applying for a job.

There are so many different types of businesses and organizations in today’s market. At times, you may come across a business that is about something totally different than its title would lead you to believe. Job seekers often search for open positions online, where the job title is posted first and the name of the company second. This leads people to believe that the job title is what is most important (and it is key), but the company you choose to work for lays the foundation for a successful career.

A job really is about more than just the task at hand. Your personal values and goals should match the company you work for; otherwise, you may end up sacrificing your contentment and ethics for a paycheck. This is why it is vital to do your research on a company before applying for a job.

Thanks to the internet, this type of research is easier than ever. Most businesses have their own websites (especially if they are posting jobs online), and these sites often contain pages that cover company history, location(s), business operations, management organization and more. Some companies even share information on what they offer their employees, in terms of benefits and career opportunities.

If the job post doesn’t provide you with the company’s official web address, simply enter the company’s name in an internet search engine (like Google) to find its website. If the site doesn’t provide you with all of the information you want, don’t hesitate to call the business to get the answers you are looking for. Calling also gives you the opportunity to connect with someone who already works for the company, giving you a leg up on an interview, should you decide to apply.

If you do apply and get called for an interview, you will also already be prepared for any questions the interviewer might have about your knowledge of the company. In addition, you will have had more time to contemplate any additional questions you want to ask during the interview about the business.

Good luck with your search!

Lauren Bailey researches and writes information on the best online colleges and degrees for modern students. She is also a freelance blogger and loves writing about education, new technology, lifestyle and health. She welcomes comments and questions via email at blauren99@gmail.com.

  • Job Search Part 2:Where are you looking for work?
  • Job Search Part 4: Writing That Winning CV

Management – recruiting and selecting the right people

I want you for the Navy promotion for anyone e...

Management – recruiting and selecting the right people

Recruiting the right people is crucial in ensuring your organization performs successfully. This new series of posts will provide the guidance you need in how to recruit and select people.  It will show the contribution that you can make as a manager to that recruitment process.

We are going to look at how to

  1. Analyse the job
  2. Write a job description
  3. Create a competency framework for the role
  4. Write a person specification
  5. Choose and use a recruitment method and a selection procedure including
    1. How to create an advertisement
    2. How to create an interview plan
    3. How to carry out an interview
    4. How to select the right candidate.

Recruiting the wrong person costs you money and causes disruption in the organization. It can cause distress and low morale.

If someone doesn’t ‘fit’ they may quit and you will have to recruit all over again.  Or you are left sorting out the problems.

It is much better to have the right recruitment system in place in the first place. You need a system that is

  •  EFFICIENT – cost effective
  • EFFECTIVE – attracting enough suitable candidates who are likely to fit into the organization
  • FAIR – stays inside the law in terms of avoiding unlawful discrimination and where decisions are made on merit alone.

When you have a vacancy, the first thing you think of is replacing the person. But this is actually a great opportunity to consider whether the work is needed at all and, if so, how best to get it done. Perhaps it could be shared between existing staff or it might not require a full time replacement.

So before any recruitment activity takes place, we need to understand the role and that is done by completing a job analysis. That is what I shall write about in the next post in this series next week.  From the job analysis we shall go on to write a job description that really helps to find the right candidate.

Wendy Mason is a Life and Career Coach.  She helps people have the confidence they need to be successful at work and to change career while maintaining a good work/life balance. You can email her at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com


Changing Job Titles On Your CV

Changing Job Titles On Your CV

Changing Job Titles On Your CV
Image via Wikipedia

Changing job titles on your CV is risky as this post from Dawn Rasmussen points out.

“True confession time: Did you ever ‘tweak’ a job title on your résumé because the title you worked under didn’t quite fit the work that you were doing?

The truth is (and I’ve seen this a lot with clients as a résumé writer), many people have done at least some ‘creative job title engineering’ at some point… the fear of being caught diminishes simply as time has worn on, and as that particular job record slides further back into history, and the inhibitions to keep to the facts sometimes wear off as job seekers try to provide a more accurate snapshot of the work that they did.

But did you know that when you change your actual job title of record to something different on your résumé, it is seen as lying by [some] human resource personnel? …”

You can read the rest of this interesting post about the dangers of  changing job titles on your CV at following link

Modifying Resume Job Titles Risky… Unless You’re Honest | The Savvy Intern by YouTern.

Dawn Rasmussen, CMP is the president of Pathfinder Writing and Career Services.

Modifying Resume Job Titles Risky… Unless You’re Honest by Dawn Rasmussen

Résumé Gëlle Fra. Statue vum Claus Cito eegen ...
Image via Wikipedia

True confession time: Did you ever ‘tweak’ a job title on your résumé because the title you worked under didn’t quite fit the work that you were doing?

The truth is (and I’ve seen this a lot with clients as a résumé writer), many people have done at least some ‘creative job title engineering’ at some point… the fear of being caught diminishes simply as time has worn on, and as that particular job record slides further back into history, and the inhibitions to keep to the facts sometimes wear off as job seekers try to provide a more accurate snapshot of the work that they did.

But did you know that when you change your actual job title of record to something different on your résumé, it is seen as lying by human resource personnel?

You can read the rest of this interesting post from Dawn Rasmussen, CMP, who is the president of Pathfinder Writing and Career Services on the YouTern Website at the following link

Modifying Resume Job Titles Risky… Unless You’re Honest | The Savvy Intern by YouTern.