Choosing the right job

Choosing the right job

Career Development: The fine art of taking risks, living with “what ifs” and not having regrets

Choosing the right job – how do you decide which job is right for you? We know that people who make career plans and have a career goal are usually more successful.  One occasion when having a clear plan is particularly useful is when it comes to deciding between opportunities. Let us suppose you are one of those lucky people, very lucky in the present climate, who has been offered two good jobs.  How do you decide between them?   If you have a goal and a plan to achieve it, then you have a map of the territory you need to travel to make your decision.

Choosing the right job – criteria!

If you have a plan and a goal, you can set your criteria for selection.  These would be mine! Which of these two jobs is;

  • Most compatible with my career plan and the goal I have set myself.
  • Provides the money I need to support myself,
  • Meets my needs to exercise autonomy and express my our own special talents and creativity
  • Provides a boss I find inspiring and a team I want to work with
  • Fits in with the rest of my life 

This is my list – you have to make your own, I’m afraid.  But however you decide, you need to recognize that your choice brings with it an element of risk.  Even though you think you have done your homework well.  You have done lots of research on the organization, asked lots of questions and consulted contacts who have encountered them in the past.  Still, when you start work it is different to what you expected, because all jobs are to some extent.  It may turn out not to be the exact fit you thought it was and that boss may turn out to be human , just like the rest of us,  and to have flaws. That is the risk you take with any job.

Making no choice is not an option.  You make the best choice you can! But making a choice always comes with risks. It is always possible the other job could have turned out better.  But how much use is spending time thinking about that?  Surely it is better to commit yourself to the job you have taken and do your best in it.  I’m not suggesting that you should stay put if you are being badly treated but let us assume it remains a reasonable job with reasonable people.  Then wasting time on regrets and thinking about what might have been doesn’t do anything good for you at all.  It simply erodes your enthusiasm and your ability to shine where you are.

And yet I encounter time and again people who are spending time on “what ifs” and “if onlys”.  They become so absorbed in the day dream of how it could have been that they lose the ability to focus on the here and now and be happy where they are.  Don’t let that happen to you?  If you find yourself starting down that track imagine a big Stop Sign.  Pull yourself up and make a list of all the good things about where you are now. Then go out and do something, don’t spend time ruminating – that way lies unhappiness. If all else fail get in touch with someone like me – work with a coach or counsellor and learn how to focus on the present – that way lies happiness and success.

Wendy Mason is the Happiness Coach and author of a new novel, The Wolf Project.  Wendy is a life and career coach and writer. She is passionate about helping people find happiness at work and at home! To find out more email: wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com, find her on Skype at wendymason14, or call +44 (0) 2081239146 (02081239146 for UK callers) or +1 262 317 9016 if you are in the US. 

A free trial/consultation allows you to give phone coaching a real trial without any financial risk. And remember there are great benefits to be achieved from coaching by phone or Skype.

CV review and interview preparation a speciality

 

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Tips for New Managers

Tips for New Managers

Management; 10 Tips for New Managers

Must dos for first-time bosses

Tips for New Managers – with the right training and guidance, millennials can lead as well as managers wiser in both years and experience. I think you will find this post by Jessica Harper on the  U.S. News Money website useful if you are just starting out.

“Who says 20- and early 30-somethings can’t be effective leaders in the workplace? With the right training and guidance, millennials can lead as well as managers wiser in both years and experience. Here are 10 tips for first-time managers who want to excel:

1. Seek a mentor. It’s generally easier to take on a managerial role with a sound support system in place. A little encouragement can yield immense benefits for novice supervisors. “Find a mentor and/or role model,” says Steve Bailey, president of the National Management Association. “Look at others who seem to be effective and happy in their work. Ask them for their advice,” he says. “People appreciate that.

2. Bridge the generational divide. In the current workforce, it’s not uncommon for a millennial to manage a baby boomer. But occasionally, an older worker might be less than thrilled with the idea of being managed by someone who was still in diapers when he or she was well into their first job. Bailey says young supervisors should prep themselves for that struggle. “Of course those conflicts can easily arise,” says Bailey. “And someone needs to tell the younger managers to expect them. More importantly, they need to be coached and taught the importance of emotional intelligence—that ability to read others, to show empathy, to listen, and to respect the experience of others.”

Misconceptions can also deepen the divide….

Read the rest at http://money.usnews.com/money/careers/articles/2012/07/12/10-tips-for-new-managers

Wendy Mason is the Happiness Coach and author of a new novel, The Wolf Project.  Wendy is a life and career coach and writer. She is passionate about helping people find happiness at work and at home! To find out more email wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com, find her on Skype at wendymason14, or call +44 (0) 2081239146 (02081239146 for UK callers) or +1 262 317 9016 if you are in the US.  

A free trial/consultation allows you to give phone coaching a real trial without any financial risk. And remember there are great benefits to be achieved from coaching by phone or Skype.

CV review and interview preparation a speciality

  • Why Telephone Coaching Works
  • Career Development – The Value of a Career Plan and Making One!
  • Job Search – Top Ten Job Search And Social Media Questions
  • Managing People – Know Yourself!
  • Management, Orders and Attitude – Millennials and Beyond – Youth Unemployment

 

Management; 10 Tips for New Managers

Photo:wikipedia

Management; 10 Tips for New Managers

Must dos for first-time bosses

With the right training and guidance, millennials can lead as well as managers wiser in both years and experience.

I think you will find this post by Jessica Harper on the  U.S. News Money website useful if you are just starting out.

“Who says 20- and early 30-somethings can’t be effective leaders in the workplace? With the right training and guidance, millennials can lead as well as managers wiser in both years and experience. Here are 10 tips for first-time managers who want to excel:

1. Seek a mentor. It’s generally easier to take on a managerial role with a sound support system in place. A little encouragement can yield immense benefits for novice supervisors. “Find a mentor and/or role model,” says Steve Bailey, president of the National Management Association. “Look at others who seem to be effective and happy in their work. Ask them for their advice,” he says. “People appreciate that.

2. Bridge the generational divide. In the current workforce, it’s not uncommon for a millennial to manage a baby boomer. But occasionally, an older worker might be less than thrilled with the idea of being managed by someone who was still in diapers when he or she was well into their first job. Bailey says young supervisors should prep themselves for that struggle. “Of course those conflicts can easily arise,” says Bailey. “And someone needs to tell the younger managers to expect them. More importantly, they need to be coached and taught the importance of emotional intelligence—that ability to read others, to show empathy, to listen, and to respect the experience of others.”

Misconceptions can also deepen the divide….

Read the rest at http://money.usnews.com/money/careers/articles/2012/07/12/10-tips-for-new-managers

Wendy Smith is a  Life Coach helping you find fresh perspectives on your life including your career. She helps people lead happier lives and feel more fulfilled. Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book a FREE coaching session with Wendy or find out more at this link

Management, Orders and Attitude – Millennials and Beyond – Youth Unemployment

Management, Orders and Attitude – Millennials and Beyond – Youth Unemployment

Continuing high levels of youth unemployment are a worry for everyone. If you are young, you worry about finding a job: if you are old, you worry who is going to support the services that you will need as you get even older. In my family we have children and grandchildren who are in the group finding it hard to find work.

So I found one conversation I had recently with a young man in his twenties rather worrying. He is someone who has had no real experience of being employed beyond a few weeks;

Me: “So, you left the new job. But I thought you were so happy to get it!”
Him: “Yes, I had to go really!”
Me: “Really? Why was that?”
Him: “Well, they were treating me badly.”
Me: “That sounds grim. What happened?”
Him: “Well, first of all they got annoyed because I was late a few times. I wasn’t that late – half an hour, an hour sometimes, maybe!”
Me: “Did you offer to stay longer to finish your work?”
Him: “No, I had things to do. I couldn’t stay later. Plus they were nasty about it. They didn’t like it and they kept on about it. Why would I do anything for them? And they’d started giving me orders – they kept telling me what to do. They weren’t treating me with respect.”

Now, he is someone who I have always found perfectly polite, helpful and reliable. And yet when I inquired further, the comments made by his employer sounded reasonable to me; they were things that I might have said. But, I don’t think from conversations that I have had with others, that he is exceptional for his generation. And, yes, he is very serious about wanting to work; he just wants to do it on terms that he considers fair.

So, where does that leave us as employers from another generation. Is it up to us to adapt? As a boss with a new employee, you do expect to be able to tell them what you want them to do. Also, you reserve the right to point out when they get things wrong. When you recruit someone, you agree what hours they will work and often what time they will start and finish. Of course we should all treat employees with respect. But what if you have a different understanding of what treating someone with respect actually means?

I’m beginning to be troubled by the clear conflict of cultures and its results for all of us. If anyone has ideas for how we bridge the gap, I’d love to hear them. There are lots of brilliant young people out there who deserve good opportunities. Right now I’m not sure how we give them.

Wendy Mason is the Happiness Coach and author of a new novel, The Wolf Project.  Wendy is a life and career coach and writer. She is passionate about helping people find happiness at work and at home! To find out more email wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com, find her on Skype at wendymason14, or call +44 (0) 2081239146 (02081239146 for UK callers) or +1 262 317 9016 if you are in the US.  

A free trial/consultation allows you to give phone coaching a real trial without any financial risk. And remember there are great benefits to be achieved from coaching by phone or Skype.

CV review and interview preparation a speciality

  • Why Telephone Coaching Works
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Career Development – The Value of a Career Plan and Making One!

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Career Development – The Value of a Career Plan!

 

A career plan can help you be clear about your skills and how you would like to use them.  Developing a plan can help you think through your next move in a career that best suits your talents; what further skills you need and what training you might seek.

By developing a career plan, you can work out the overall direction you want your career to take. The work needed to make your plan will help you have a better understanding of your skills and experience when you are preparing your CV/resume.

But, one in point to keep in mind is that your career plan should be a tool and a not a constraint.  You may have a plan, but you should regard it as a living document that requires regular review, at least once each year for the following reasons

 

  • New opportunities may emerge
  • These days the job market is in a constant state of flux
  • Your personal circumstances and needs may change
  • You may have developed new skills
  • You will have gained more and possibly more diverse experiences

 

A career plan is useful, but don’t let it blind you to the exciting opportunities that you may discover along the way.  Because they don’t fit in exactly with what you had planned don’t just dismiss them – be ready to be flexible and reconsider what you had planned.  Also, if unfortunately something goes wrong (such as, redundancy), don’t see that as an end to your career – treat it as an opportunity to re-assess your plan and make a fresh start.

Making a plan

 

Here is some guidance;

 

  1. Decide your career goals, over the next year, three years and five years and then have a very flexible longer term goal. Shorter term career goals can be about quite specific jobs you want to do or experience you want to gain.  Very long-term goals might be about working in a particular field and reaching a particular level.
  2. In thinking through career goals, you discover career possibilities you wouldn’t have thought of otherwise. There may be several different job possibilities within any chosen field.  Do some research – don’t settle for just what you know about already.
  3. A career goal should fit in with what you want from all parts of your life; such as the level of income you may need if you plan to marry and have a family.
  4. Think about how you need to prepare to meet your goals. Do you need special training or to seek out particular kinds of experience? If so, explore how you can find and support them.
  5. Write your career plan down – commit it to paper. Then, if you are serious about it, share it with someone you trust and make sure you are able to explain it clearly to them.  That is a good way to make sure your plan has real value and it should mean you make to a real commitment to it. 
  6. Put a date in your diary for your first review and start putting your plan into action.

 

Good luck with your plan and if you would like some help please get in touch – I offer a telephone (plus by Skype and on-line) coaching service and the first session is free.

 

Wendy Mason is the Happiness Coach and author of a new novel, The Wolf Project.  Wendy is a life and career coach and writer. She is passionate about helping people find happiness at work and at home! To find out more email wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com, find her on Skype at wendymason14, or call +44 (0) 2081239146 (02081239146 for UK callers) or +1 262 317 9016 if you are in the US.  

A free trial/consultation allows you to give phone coaching a real trial without any financial risk. And remember there are great benefits to be achieved from coaching by phone or Skype.

 

CV review and interview preparation a speciality

 

 

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Personal Devopment; How to Stay Motivated Throughout the Day

How to Stay Motivated Throughout the Day

Brian Tracy is one of the most listened to audio author on personal and business success. His fast-moving talks and seminars on leadership, sales, managerial effectiveness and business strategy are loaded with powerful, proven ideas and strategies that people can immediately apply to get better results in every area.

He believes that to be successful, you must keep up high levels of energy to complete all the goals you set for yourself.  He stays energetic and motivated throughout the day by getting plenty of rest every night, having a good breakfast, and getting regular exercise. Here is his video on the subject.

Wendy Mason is the Happiness Coach and author of a new novel, The Wolf Project Wendy is a life and career coach and writer. She is passionate about helping people find happiness at work and at home! She helps people reach their goals and aspirations, without sacrificing their home and personal life.  She believes coaching requires compassion, warmth and empathy. Wendy helps people reach their career goals and aspirations, without sacrificing their home and personal life. You can contact Wendy at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com and find out more at http://wisewolfcoaching.com

CV review and interview preparation a speciality

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Career Development – Six Tips To Help You Look Confident

Career Development – Six Tips To Help You Look Confident

Why is looking confident important?

If you want people to have confidence in you, as well as being good at what you do, you need to look confident. Yes, I know that is a little unfair – surely being good should be enough?  Sadly in the real world, that is rare!
So, do you look confident?
If I met you for the first time, what would I see and what would I hear?  What would your body language tell me?  Would I want to get to know you better? Would I have confidence in your ability to do that job I might have available. Or, would I buy that product or service from you?
The need for confidence goes beyond work, of course. People like others who are confident as friends and potential partners.
When it comes to appearing confident, remember that over 70% of our communication is transmitted by our body language. So, while you are working to increase your  confidence, how do you change your body language to make you look confident?  Here are some tips to help:

Six Tips To Help You Look Confident

      1. Start with your feet.  Stand with them at least 12 inches apart and have your weight distributed evenly between them. Plant the soles of your feet firmly and evenly on the ground – let them give a firm support to the rest of your body. Now, you are rooted but not rooted to the spot! But don’t lock your knees – instead keep them soft and very slightly flexed.
      2. Let you spine be proud. Your spine protects and supports your internal organs! Feel your spine lifting you to the sky – that is what it is there for!  Lift your upper body out of your pelvis and stand upright.  Feel yourself “lengthening your spine” – stand proud!  Try thinking of a piece of string attached to the top of your head gently pulling upwards. But don’t stand rigidly – you are not a soldier on parade.
      3. Keep your shoulders relaxed. Let them drop – don’t lift them high. The shoulders and neck often show how tense we are – let yours relax.
      4. Let your shoulders widen rather than pull back. Open your chest up so that you can breathe freely.  That in itself will make you feel more relaxed.
      5. Smile.  Work on learning to smile naturally at home.   Practice some affirmations giving yourself some positive messages, for example; “relax and smile”, “calm and smile”, “wonderful people make me smile”.  Bring that smile to your eyes and let it broaden to fill your whole body and mind. Practice feeling how it feels.  Now when you meet other people say quietly to your self – “these are the wonderful people who make me smile”.  Now find yourself smiling.
      6. Change your focus.  When we go into a new situation if we lack confidence, we tend to focus on ourselves and how we feel.  You can deliberately change your focus to the people about you. Start to be interested in them rather than how you are feeling. You will look approachable and look more confident.

Finding help

Practice my six tips and you will be surprised at the effect.  You may well find yourself, not just looking more confident, but feeling more confident too.  It helps to work with a coach of course and I just happen to be a qualified confidence coach – so feel free to get in touch!

Wendy Mason is the Happiness Coach and author of a new novel, The Wolf Project Wendy is a life and career coach and writer. She is passionate about helping people find happiness at work and at home! She helps people reach their goals and aspirations, without sacrificing their home and personal life.  She believes coaching requires compassion, warmth and empathy. Wendy helps people reach their career goals and aspirations, without sacrificing their home and personal life. You can contact Wendy at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com and find out more at http://wisewolfcoaching.com

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Your Annual Performance Review

Your Annual Performance Review

Career Development – Preparing For Your Annual Performance Review

Your Annual Performance Review – in this video, Angela Huffmon helps you prepare for your performance evaluation/review with your manager. This should help you  feel equipped to discuss your accomplishments, and improvements made during the year.

This video should help make your performance evaluation experience less stressful and help you to help your boss give you a good review.

Remember an open, honest and positive approach usually generates the best response.


For more from Angela visit http://www.angelahuffmon.biz/webinars

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

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Career Development – Preparing For Your Annual Performance Review

Career Development – Preparing For Your Annual Performance Review

In this video, Angela Huffmon helps you prepare for your performance evaluation/review with your manager. This should help you  feel equipped to discuss your accomplishments, and improvements made during the year.

This video should help make your performance evaluation experience less stressful and help you to help your boss give you a good review.

Remember an open, honest and positive approach usually generates the best response.


For more from Angela visit http://www.angelahuffmon.biz/webinars

Wendy Mason is the Happiness Coach and author of a new novel, The Wolf Project Wendy is a life and career coach and writer. She is passionate about helping people find happiness at work and at home! She helps people reach their goals and aspirations, without sacrificing their home and personal life.  She believes coaching requires compassion, warmth and empathy. Wendy helps people reach their career goals and aspirations, without sacrificing their home and personal life. You can contact Wendy at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com and find out more at http://wisewolfcoaching.com

Career development: What To Do When You Feel Stuck!

Career development: What To Do When You Feel  Stuck!

So you took this job full of enthusiasm.  You thought it was the right job, at the right time, in the right place.  It looked interesting and you liked the people who interviewed you. They told you how the company was committed to good management and developing their people.  There seemed to be really good opportunities to advance your career and everyone told you how lucky you were to get a job in these testing economic times.

You’ve been there a year now and things have not turned out as you expected. Yes, the job was interesting when you first started and there was a lot to learn. Your manager is good at her job but these days she never seems to know what is going on at the top.  Everyone’s budget has been cut and a member of your team who left to go travelling has not been replaced.  You and the rest of the team are having to work harder to provide cover and there is very little possibility that you will allowed to go on a part-time training course, even if you fund the training yourself.

Right now you are feeling stuck and wonder if you made the right decision. But all those people who told you were lucky to get the job are saying you would be foolish to leave.

Sadly, you are not alone! I keep hearing this tale from clients and from people I meet in social media. There are lots of good organizations, and good managers, who can’t now offer the career development opportunities for their staff that they could a couple of years ago. Training budgets are being cut and vacancies are being held. And we all know about redundancies.

Because the job market is so slow, people are reluctant to move on and that means opportunities for promotion, and for moving round inside the organization, may be less.  Everyone in the public and private sectors seems to be working harder and longer.

So what can you do?  Well first of all see this for what it is; it isn’t personal.  These tougher conditions are going to be around for all of us for quite a while.  Unless you have scarce niche skills, finding another job is going to be hard and it is much better done while you are already in employment.  But don’t jump to thinking that leaving this employer is necessarily the best move.  Instead, start to think creatively about where you are now and the job you do.

Are there changes you can make to improve how you and your team are working – can you improve productivity and efficiency?  Alongside your work, can you make improving things a special project that will benefit you, as well as the company?

What about forming a learning group with your own team? How about developing an action learning set as a regular lunch time activity? Perhaps you could learn in your own time how to facilitate the set.  That way everyone could benefit.

If you are in an organization that has other people at your level, could you organize a job swap to give you and a colleague some wider experience.

If your manager really doesn’t know what is going on at the top, can you find out more yourself? Could you use the internet to find what is happening in the sector? What is the world outside saying about your company and its major customers?

While, it is always sensible to keep your CV up to date and keep your eyes open for other opportunities, don’t think the best move is necessarily out.  All jobs have periods when they are more or less interesting and much of the motivation to do the work needs to come from within you.   At the end of the day, you, not your employer are responsible for your career development.

Wendy Mason is the Happiness Coach and author of a new novel, The Wolf Project Wendy is a life and career coach and writer. She is passionate about helping people find happiness at work and at home! She helps people reach their goals and aspirations, without sacrificing their home and personal life.  She believes coaching requires compassion, warmth and empathy. Wendy helps people reach their career goals and aspirations, without sacrificing their home and personal life. You can contact Wendy at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com and find out more at http://wisewolfcoaching.com

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