The Value of Goals

The Value of Goals

Quotes – Leadership Success – The Value of Goals

The Value of Goals – quotes from the famous to show you why they are key to success.

It is not enough to take steps which may some day lead to a goal; each step must be itself a goal and a step likewise. Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Our plans miscarry because they have no aim. When a man does not know what harbour he is making for, no wind is the right wind. Seneca

Life can be pulled by goals just as surely as it can be pushed by drives. Viktor Frankl

If you don’t know where you are going, you’ll end up some place else. Anon

Goals are the fuel in the furnace of achievement. Brian Tracy, Eat that Frog

In everything the ends well defined are the secret of durable success. Victor Cousins

I have learned, that if one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavours to live the life he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours. Henry Thoreau

The people who get on in this world are the people who get up and look for the circumstances they want and if they can’t find them, make them. George Bernard Shaw

The secret to productive goal setting is in establishing clearly defined goals, writing them down and then focusing on them several times a day with words, pictures and emotions as if we’ve already achieved them. Denis Waitley

Goals are not only absolutely necessary to motivate us. They are essential to really keep us alive. Robert H. Schuller

Fear melts when you take action towards a goal you really want. Robert Allen

All successful people have a goal. No one can get anywhere unless he knows where he wants to go and what he wants to be or do. Norman Vincent Peale

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

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Monday Quotes – Leadership Success – The Value of Goals

Monday Quotes – Leadership Success – The Value of Goals

It is not enough to take steps which may some day lead to a goal; each step must be itself a goal and a step likewise. Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Our plans miscarry because they have no aim. When a man does not know what harbour he is making for, no wind is the right wind. Seneca

Life can be pulled by goals just as surely as it can be pushed by drives. Viktor Frankl

If you don’t know where you are going, you’ll end up some place else. Anon

Goals are the fuel in the furnace of achievement. Brian Tracy, Eat that Frog

In everything the ends well defined are the secret of durable success. Victor Cousins

I have learned, that if one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavours to live the life he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours. Henry Thoreau

The people who get on in this world are the people who get up and look for the circumstances they want and if they can’t find them, make them. George Bernard Shaw

The secret to productive goal setting is in establishing clearly defined goals, writing them down and then focusing on them several times a day with words, pictures and emotions as if we’ve already achieved them. Denis Waitley

Goals are not only absolutely necessary to motivate us. They are essential to really keep us alive. Robert H. Schuller

Fear melts when you take action towards a goal you really want. Robert Allen

All successful people have a goal. No one can get anywhere unless he knows where he wants to go and what he wants to be or do. Norman Vincent Peale

Wendy Mason is a career coach.  She helps people reach their goals and aspirations, without sacrificing their home and personal life.  Before working as a coach, Wendy had a long career in both the public and private sectors in general management and consultancy as well as spells in HR.  She now divides her time between coaching and writing. You can contact Wendy at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com and find out more at http://wisewolfcoaching.com

  • Thursday Quotes – What Makes A Good Boss
  • What is Personal Development?
  • The Ten Pillars for Emotional Resilience
  • Personal Change – Why Having a Personal Development Mindset Is Important For Each One of Us
  • Leader – are you ready to go on the vision quest?

Self acceptance – learning to accept yourself!

Self acceptance – learning to accept yourself!

Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 7 Learning to Accept Yourself

Self acceptance – learning to accept yourself! You can find the earlier posts in this series at the links below. In the last few posts I’ve asked you to start thinking about emotions. I’ve explained how identifying your troublesome emotion helps you gain control and make sure things turn out more positively for you in the future. As well as that, I asked you to think about what is most difficult for you, then I asked you to set some goals.

In the last post we thought about challenging and beginning to change those core beliefs we all carry. They get in the way when we want to make a personal change that will improve our lives. Now we are going to think about developing self acceptance.

Everyone who has ever lived has had problems.  Having problems doesn’t make you a better or worse human being – nor does it make you different.  In fact it makes you truly a human being – someone who makes mistakes and sometimes suffers misfortune. You are not what you do or what happens to you.  You are you, and one of us, the vast human race.  But it is great that you want to change or improve something about yourself!

If you accept yourself with what you see as flaws, it means you can concentrate on problem solving.  If you can’t accept yourself you can very easily be distracted by shame and the time you spend putting yourself down.

There is a great way of illustrating self acceptance.  It is called the big i/little i diagram ( Lazarus 1977)

If you look closely you will that this Big I (the self) is made up of lots of little Is. The little I’s are all the things about you; “I’m tall”, “I’m short”,” I’m fat”, “I’m thin”, “I’m good at sports”,” I’m hopeless at maths” etc.  Or they might be things that you have done; “I failed my exam”, “I hurt someone I loved”, “I give to charity”, etc.  Anyone of them may be true.  But none of them makes up the whole, wonderful complexity of you, yourself.

Now, if you can’t accept yourself, you might find this idea difficult to accept as well. But think about it.  And think about what I said in the last post about how to test self beliefs.  Think of all the evidence there is that you are complex with many aspects and experiences.  Then think about how you see other people in their complexity.  Now, think about which is the more helpful way to think about your self.

So suppose you see the things that you need to change as little Is, that you can work on.  They are not the whole big I that is going to do the work. Start to recognise yourself as complex and multi dimensional.

You could draw a large I diagram and then start to put into it all the little Is about you.  The good and the bad – make sure you are even-handed.  Now, circle some of those good Is and really concentrate on them.  Then, think about the things you want to change and let that complex, wonderful Big I you, start to make plans.

Remember, self acceptance doesn’t mean you become complacent and stop trying to make changes.  Self acceptance changes how you see the changes you want to make.  It helps to makes those changes manageable and achievable.  It means you do not waste precious time on putting your self down and feeling bad.

Self acceptance doesn’t happen over night it takes work.  It takes a little time every day thinking about the Big I and focusing on your goals to make the change you want. Work on it because the benefits of self acceptance, in terms of happiness, mental health and achievement, are huge.

The next post in this series will about strengthening and re-enforcing your new self-helping outlook.

You can learn how to develop self-esteem and to develop self acceptance and I would like to help you.  Email me now to arrange a free half-hour taster coaching session by Skype.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

 

Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 7 Learning To Accept Yourself

Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 7 Learning to Accept Yourself

You can find the earlier posts in this series at the links below. In the last few posts I’ve asked you to start thinking about emotions. I’ve explained how identifying your troublesome emotion helps you gain control and make sure things turn out more positively for you in the future. As well as that, I asked you to think about what is most difficult for you, then I asked you to set some goals.

In the last post we thought about challenging and beginning to change those core beliefs we all carry. They get in the way when we want to make a personal change that will improve our lives. Now we are going to think about developing self acceptance.

Everyone who has ever lived has had problems.  Having problems doesn’t make you a better or worse human being – nor does it make you different.  In fact it makes you truly a human being – someone who makes mistakes and sometimes suffers misfortune. You are not what you do or what happens to you.  You are you, and one of us, the vast human race.  But it is great that you want to change or improve something about yourself!

If you accept yourself with what you see as flaws, it means you can concentrate on problem solving.  If you can’t accept yourself you can very easily be distracted by shame and the time you spend putting yourself down.

There is a great way of illustrating self acceptance.  It is called the big i/little i diagram ( Lazarus 1977)

If you look closely you will that this Big I (the self) is made up of lots of little Is. The little I’s are all the things about you; “I’m tall”, “I’m short”,” I’m fat”, “I’m thin”, “I’m good at sports”,” I’m hopeless at maths” etc.  Or they might be things that you have done; “I failed my exam”, “I hurt someone I loved”, “I give to charity”, etc.  Anyone of them may be true.  But none of them makes up the whole, wonderful complexity of you, yourself.

Now, if you can’t accept yourself, you might find this idea difficult to accept as well. But think about it.  And think about what I said in the last post about how to test self beliefs.  Think of all the evidence there is that you are complex with many aspects and experiences.  Then think about how you see other people in their complexity.  Now, think about which is the more helpful way to think about your self.

So suppose you see the things that you need to change as little Is, that you can work on.  They are not the whole big I that is going to do the work. Start to recognise yourself as complex and multi dimensional.

You could draw a large I diagram and then start to put into it all the little Is about you.  The good and the bad – make sure you are even-handed.  Now, circle some of those good Is and really concentrate on them.  Then, think about the things you want to change and let that complex, wonderful Big I you, start to make plans.

Remember, self acceptance doesn’t mean you become complacent and stop trying to make changes.  Self acceptance changes how you see the changes you want to make.  It helps to makes those changes manageable and achievable.  It means you do not waste precious time on putting your self down and feeling bad.

Self acceptance doesn’t happen over night it takes work.  It takes a little time every day thinking about the Big I and focusing on your goals to make the change you want. Work on it because the benefits of self acceptance, in terms of happiness, mental health and achievement, are huge.

The next post in this series will about strengthening and re-enforcing your new self-helping outlook.

I know you can learn how to develop self-esteem and to develop self acceptance and I would like to help you.  Email me now to arrange a free half-hour taster coaching session by Skype.

Wendy Mason is a career coach working mainly with professional women who want to make that jump to senior level while having a life outside work. Before working as a coach, Wendy had a long career in both the public and private sectors in general management and consultancy as well as spells in HR. She now divides her time between face to face coaching, and coaching and blogging on-line. You can contact Wendy at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com and find out more athttp://wisewolfcoaching.com

Coming shortly – Getting There With WiseWolf, the Career and Personal Development Programme – if you would like to know more emailwendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com

Earlier Posts in this series

    • Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 1 Admit A Change is Needed

    • Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 2 Be Clear About The Change You Want

    • Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 3 Be Clear About What Is Troubling You

    • Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 4 Identify what is most difficult for you

    • Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 5 Select Your Goals for Change
    • Be Successful -Making A Personal Change – Part 6 Change Your Core Beliefs

Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 6 Change Your Core Beliefs

Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 6 Change Your Core Beliefs

You can find the earlier posts in this series at the links below. In the last few posts I’ve asked you to start thinking about emotions. I’ve explained how identifying your troublesome emotion helps you gain control and make sure things turn out more positively for you in the future. As well as that, I asked you to think about what is most difficult for you, then I asked you to set some goals. Now we are going to think about challenging and beginning to change those core beliefs we all carry. They get in the way when we want to make a personal change that will improve our lives. As I’ve said before, success depends on being very honest with yourself.

We all carry unhelpful beliefs about ourselves, about other people and about the world about us. We gather them up as we go through life from our parents, our teachers, others about us and from things that happen to us. We learn to think, for example, that we are lazy or stupid. May be we think we are bad people, unworthy of happiness or success; or that people like us just never succeed! Most of these belief are not founded in anything real but we go on believing.

We may have failed at something once but that doesn’t mean we will not succeed this time or that we are less worthy of happiness.

There are three tests that we can apply to our core beliefs to see if it is worth letting them spoil the rest of our lives. They are

  • Logic

  • Reality-Testing

  • Helpfulness

Logic

If you have been unlucky enough to experience some kind of failure in life, such as, losing a job or a relationship, it isn’t logical to think of your self as a failure. Stop for one moment and think how you would judge a close friend or relation if they came to you and told you they were in the same place. What would you think and what would you say? So, why are you different? Is it sound, logical or consistent to apply different standards to you, to those you apply to the rest of the world? You are worthwhile even if you have failed lots of times – my word yes – you had the guts to try!

Reality-Testing

Does you core belief match with objective reality? Think of everything you have done throughout your life. Has every single thing been a failure? I doubt it. We all succeed at some things and fail at others. Think quietly about the good things you have done; things you have enjoyed and the things other people have liked and thanked you for. Gather evidence like a forensic detective. Where is the hard cold evidence that your core belief is really true – where does the balance of your life-long evidence lead you.

Helpfulness

What is carrying this core belief actually doing for you? Does it help you overcome your problems and feel better? Are you a “better” person because you carry this self belief? Some people do see calling themselves failures or unworthy as motivating them to do or be better. But for most of us, it just saps energy, erodes our self-esteem and makes us feel bad.

Coming to terms with the consequences of our core beliefs often helps us to have the confidence to get rid of them.

The next post in this series will about self acceptance. Accepting ourselves as we really are, is key to making that lasting change that is going to lead to real fulfilment and success in the future.

I know you can develop the confidence you need to change your core beliefs and I would like to help you.  Email me now to arrange a free half-hour taster coaching session.

Wendy Mason is a career coach working mainly with professional women who want to make that jump to senior level while having a life outside work. Before working as a coach, Wendy had a long career in both the public and private sectors in general management and consultancy as well as spells in HR. She now divides her time between face to face coaching, and coaching and blogging on-line. You can contact Wendy at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com and find out more at http://wisewolfcoaching.com

Coming shortly – the WiseWolf Career and Personal Development Programme – if you would like to know more email wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com

Earlier Posts in this series

  • Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 1 Admit A Change is Needed

  • Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 2 Be Clear About The Change You Want

  • Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 3 Be Clear About What Is Troubling You

  • Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 4 Identify what is most difficult for you

  • Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 5 Select Your Goals for Change

 

Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 5 Select Your Goals For Change

Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 5 Select Your Goals For Change

You can find the earlier posts in this series at the links below.  In the last two posts I asked you to start thinking about emotions.  I explained how identifying your troublesome emotion helps you gain control and make sure things turn out more positively for you in the future. On top of that, I asked you to think about what is most difficult for you.  I said that success depends on being very honest with yourself.

Now we know what the problems are, we are going to set some goals. Goals are the outcomes that you want from your change. Selecting them sounds very simple but there are things that you would be wise to avoid.

  1. Don’t choose a goal that you can’t achieve or that depends on someone else changing first.  For example, you can decide that you will try to be less jealous in a relationship.  But you can’t control your partner’s behavior so that he does less of whatever it is that triggers your jealousy.  Though, you might decide that in future, instead of getting upset, you will explain to him quietly what has just happened to make you feel unhappy
  2. Don’t select quick-fix, short-term goals that don’t really deal with the underlying problem.  You’ll simply feel more frustrated next time
  3. Do not set out your goals in negative terms,  for example, “I don’t want to keep eating foods that do me harm”.  Instead, focus on the positive – “I want to eat a healthy diet and feel fitter”.
  4. Don’t set yourself unrealistic goals which are either too challenging – “I will run three miles a day” for example – when you first start running.  You will probably fail, feel miserable and give up.  But nor should you set the bar too low – “I will run round the block”. That might be so easy it gives you no feeling of satisfaction, so again you give up.
  5. Don’t be too stoical.  Don’t be so brave that you don’t make a real change that might relieve your pain and make you happy
  6. Don’t be too vague – for example, “I want to lose weight” is far less effective than “I want to lose 20 pounds by Christmas, so starting now, I will lose 2 pounds each week.”
  7. Don’t set goals that conflict with your values. For example,  “I resolve not to upset my husband by telling him how unhappy his behavior makes  me, because I know it upsets him”. His behavior may not be acceptable to you in terms of your values and keeping quiet may damage your self-esteem, as well as feeling miserable and resentful.

Goals you set for yourself are not set in concrete.  It will make sense to review them as you make your change.  This is to make sure they are still relevant and that they stay challenging, but achievable.

The next post in this series on making a personal change will be about challenging and changing the core beliefs we all carry.  They can get in the way of making a personal change to improve our lives.

The earlier posts in this series are below.

Wendy Mason is a Life and Career Coach.  She helps people have the confidence they need to be successful at work and to change career while maintaining a good work/life balance. You can email her at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com

Earlier Posts in this series

  • Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 1 Admit A Change is Needed
  • Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 2 Be Clear About The Change You Want
  • Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 3 Be Clear About What Is Troubling You
  • Be Successful-Making A Personal Change – Part 4 Identify what is most difficult for you


A Winning Team Makes S.M.A.R.T. Goals

 

S. M.A.R.T. goals! Today we have a guest post from the University of Notre Dame, in partnership with University Alliance. The University of Notre Dame offers higher education opportunities through a variety of online executive certificates, including leadership and management, and negotiations. You can find out more about the courses they offer at this link http://www.notredameonline.com/

S.M.A.R.T. goals

A Winning Team Makes S.M.A.R.T. Goals

When applying S.M.A.R.T goals – Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant, Time-bound – to project management and organisational team building, leaders should take a deeper look at the application of motivation in the creation of effective work groups. Similar to an established sports team that plays as a cohesive unit achieving goals as a group – that is simply unattainable alone – a strong leader can use motivation to propel the momentum of team goals forward. Keep these tips in mind when building a team of excellence:

1. Motivation is a planned activity

Just as a well orchestrated series of athletic exercises builds the stamina and cohesion of a sports team, a thoughtful goal-setting program sets the pace for individuals and work groups. Each individual should identify clear goals that are precisely aligned to his or her work description. From there, managers take on the role of coach and mentor by providing ongoing feedback. It is important to understand if, and when, “time outs” to make goal adjustment are necessary. Motivation is an ongoing person-to-person activity. On an individual level, the specific needs of an employee should be satisfied, while maintaining focus on the team’s overall objectives.

2. Motivation requires versatility

Any certified and seasoned business process manager can vouch that excellent communication skills are vital for long term success. Effective leaders understand the nuances of each team member’s role and skill set, and how those skills and perspectives fit into the larger picture. Goal-setting, monitoring, and evaluation should reflect ongoing motivation that is specific and relevant to an individual’s position within the company. Every person in the organisation needs to feel that his or her contribution is important and valued. Keeping track of progress in the form of reports can help others on the team and in the company celebrate achievements. This also highlights problem areas that require redirection or strategy improvement.

3. Motivation builds collective success, not necessarily a finite “Win”

Effective motivation within the S.M.A.R.T. goals framework recognises that achieving benchmarks such as increased efficiency, profitability, and marketability is about the process, not the final destination. All effective goals dovetail into more extensive ambitions that involve sustained stamina and a dedication to the values-driven commitment of every level of contribution. Some goals will be tailored, traded for other goals, and some will be so long-reaching that exceptional ongoing motivation is vital to ensure forward momentum. An effective leader needs to understand and apply a versatile skill set when coordinating with other leaders and when energising employees. When goals cannot be achieved, the learning process involved can be just as significant as the initial goal. “SMART” leaders make the most of teachable moments.

4. Coaches need motivation too

Seasoned team leaders will tell you that one of the secrets to professional longevity is taking time to feed yourself professionally. Every great coach takes time out to recharge. You will be more effective over the long haul if you schedule time to regularly do what you need to do to replenish your motivational reserves. Your team demands your time, energy, and attention. You owe it to yourself and your team to plan – schedule time in a way that is conducive to longevity. Staggered reviews, budgeted down time, and invigorating networking events are all notable ways to sustain motivational skills.

In combination with implementing specific goals that are attainable and are easily tracked, motivating employees requires skill, versatility, and stamina. While your daily coaching life may not be as exciting as travelling the circuit with a professional sports team, carefully examining the many facets of motivation when applying S.M.A.R.T. goals to your team is imperative. Motivation skills that are up to par ensure that your team finds its own special brand of excellence and plays the game with pride, dedication, and commitment for many years to come.

The University of Notre Dame, in partnership with University Alliance, has provided this article. The University of Notre Dame offers higher education opportunities through a variety of online executive certificates, including leadership and management, and negotiations. To find out additional information about the courses offered please visit http://www.notredameonline.com/