Time to Make The Change

Time to Make The Change

Changing Careers – Part 3 Deciding Whether To Make The Change – A Checklist

Make The Change – this is the third and last part of our series for career changers. In Part 1 (Link below) we thought about whether career change could benefit you and suggested some questions that might help you to be clearer about your decision. In Part 2 (Link below) we considered how you can start building up a picture of your ideal job and find out which careers match it most closely.

Deciding to change career could be brilliant for you, but it is a big step. So you need to make sure you’ve thought of everything and you know what to expect. When you change career, you need to consider location, salary and the job market, for example. And you may also need to put some work into updating your skills and qualifications.

Here is a checklist of things to consider!

  1. Location You’ll need to consider location and how far you are willing to move. While you can probably find work as a florist in most large towns, if you’re looking to get into advertising, for example, there are likely to be more opportunities in London and other major cities.
  2. Salary and Promotion Most careers provide opportunities for promotion and you should check out what these might be. But it may not mean much more pay. You may have to decide between doing something you love or going for something less appealing with more pay.
  3. Time Changing career can eat away at your free time – you might need to work long hours, do voluntary work or study a course. Think about how this will affect others and whether you can really ask them to make the sacrifice. What about your partner, your children or anyone else you live with? Make sure you talk it over with them and let them know what will be involved. But don’t leave out the benefits – give them a balanced picture.
  4. The job market There’s competition in most careers, but some are more competitive than others. Careers that are seen as glamorous can be difficult to get into without plenty of unpaid work experience, enthusiasm and some luck. Make sure you understand what it is going to take.
  5. Working conditions What will doing the job actually mean for your day-to-day? If it involves meeting lots of people and that’s not your thing, you might want to think again. Would you prefer a job indoors, or wouldn’t you mind being outside in the depths of winter?
  6. Plan your finances This is the big one. Switching careers usually involves a drop in salary, as you try to establish yourself in a new field. Are you and your family prepared to lower your outgoings, do without holidays, share a car or use some savings for a few years, if that is required?

Changing Careers – Part 1 Where To Start! A Checklist for Career Change

Changing Careers – Part 2 Finding the right career to suit you

Help with career planning

If you need support form a coach in making a decision about a career change, please get in touch. I wish you every success in making your decision and, if it is right for you, making your career change.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

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Finding the right career

Finding the right career

Changing Careers – Part 2 Finding the right career to suit you

Finding the right career  – in Part 1 (link below)  we thought about whether career change could benefit you, and suggested some questions that might help you to be clearer about your decision. While it can be tempting to skip straight from that to looking at specific careers, it’s often a good idea to spend some time first thinking about what motivates you as a person and what you really want?

This is Part 2 of a three-part series;  In Part 1 we thought about whether career change could benefit you and suggested some questions that might help you to be clearer about your decision. In Part 3 (Link below) we have a check list to help you make a final decision on whether you really should make the change

Think about your interests, inside and outside work – what are you looking for from a career? Once you’ve worked this out, you can start building up a picture of your ideal job and you can find out which careers match it most closely

Finding the right career  – career planning: where to start!

Unless you’ve got a clear idea of what you want to do, it can be difficult to know where to start. And if you do have a career in mind, how do you know whether you’ve considered all your options?

As a starting point to finding the right career , you could try sitting down with a piece of paper and listing:

  • Courses you’ve taken in the past, or are taking now
  • Any jobs you’ve had, including voluntary work
  • Interests outside work
  • Any other significant experiences, like travelling

Then ask yourself:

  • Why you chose to do the things you have listed?
  • Which parts you really enjoyed?
  • Which parts you found frustrating or boring?
  • Which parts you were best at?
  • Which parts you found a challenge?
  • What have other people said about your contribution?
  • What other people have told you you’re good at?

You should start to see some patterns emerging; the types of skills you enjoy using, the sort of environment you perform best in and the types of people you like working with.

You can use this knowledge to help pinpoint areas of work you might enjoy.

Exploring types of careers

Once you have got an idea of areas you might want to work in, the next step is to check out some career profiles. These will give you information about the opportunities available in a particular line of work – and what skills and qualifications you’re likely to need.

Finding the right career  – you can find job profiles for over 800 different types of job, from archivist to zoologist, on the National Careers Service website at this link

Changing Careers – Part 1 Where To Start! A Checklist for Career Change

Changing Careers – Part 3 Deciding Whether To Make The Change – A Checklist

Help with career planning

If you need support form a coach in making a decision about a career change, please get in touch. I wish you every success in making your decision and, if it is right for you, making your career change.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

Checklist for Career Change

Checklist for Career Change

Changing Careers – Part 1 Where To Start! A Checklist for Career Change

Is it time for you to make career change?

Checklist for Career Change – changing careers isn’t easy. But nor is it as hard as you might imagine. I’ve done it four times in my life successfully. I’ve enjoyed the different careers at the time and I really was successful in each one. For me, there came a time to move on. Changing in this way has allowed me to come to terms with a changing economic environment and each new direction has built upon the experience and knowledge gained in the last one.

Checklist for Career Change is Part 1 of a three part series; In Part 2 (Link below) we consider how you can start building up a picture of your ideal job and find out which careers match it most closely. In Part 3 (Link below) we have a check list to help you decide whether you really should make the change

If you think a career change could benefit you, answering the following questions might help you to be clearer about your decision.

Are you actually enjoying your job, day by day?

If you’ve recently stopped enjoying the day-to-day activities in your job, consider why this may be. You may just be bored and need a new challenge in your present organization. You might think about moving to a different department. Or perhaps a change of employer might be the answer.

If you actively dislike parts of your day-to-day job, ask yourself whether what you do is typical for someone in your type of work. Do you dislike the job because you don’t get the chance to use all of your talents? If you’re dissatisfied with the job itself, changing department or employer may not improve things. You may want to consider a more radical change.

Do you feel motivated by the people you work with?

How do you get on with colleagues, managers, clients and others in your workplace? Are any problems due to personality clashes with particular people or is it the culture of your workplace or the nature of the job itself? Do you like the people you work with but are frustrated by the actual work? If so, you may want to look at changing your role within the organisation or looking for a different role with a similar employer.

Are you satisfied with your work-life balance?

If you’re looking for a better fit with your family life, a change of job isn’t always necessary.

Technology is making it possible for more people to spend time working from home. You may have the right to ask your employer to make arrangements for flexible working. Your employer can refuse if there’s a good business reason to do so. But employers are becoming much more willing to consider flexible working?

Is the time right for you to take the risk?

If you have, for example, family responsibilities and others economically dependent on you, then changing now may mean putting others at risk. Also, are you prepared to risk what you have invested in your present role and possible loss of status, perhaps only temporary, in moving into a new field? You need to be very honest with yourself and with other people who may be effected by the change you want to make. In changing careers, timing is all; when you are dealing with lots of other changes in your life, this change may not be right for you at this time.

Changing Careers – Part 2 Finding the right career to suit you

Changing Careers – Part 3 Deciding Whether To Make The Change – A Checklist

Help with career planning

If you need support form a coach in making a decision about a career change, please get in touch. I wish you every success in making your decision and, if it is right for you, making your career change.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

>

Changing Careers – Part 3 Deciding Whether To Make The Change – A Checklist

Changing Careers – Part 3 Deciding Whether To Make The Change – A Checklist

This is the third and last part of our series for career changers. In Part 1 we thought about whether career change could benefit you and suggested some questions that might help you to be clearer about your decision. In Part 2 we considered how you can start building up a picture of your ideal job and find out which careers match it most closely.

Deciding to change career could be brilliant for you, but it is a big step. So you need to make sure you’ve thought of everything and you know what to expect. When you change career, you need to consider location, salary and the job market, for example. And you may also need to put some work into updating your skills and qualifications.

Here is a checklist of things to consider!

  1. Location You’ll need to consider location and how far you are willing to move. While you can probably find work as a florist in most large towns, if you’re looking to get into advertising, for example, there are likely to be more opportunities in London and other major cities.
  2. Salary and Promotion Most careers provide opportunities for promotion and you should check out what these might be. But it may not mean much more pay. You may have to decide between doing something you love or going for something less appealing with more pay.
  3. Time Changing career can eat away at your free time – you might need to work long hours, do voluntary work or study a course. Think about how this will affect others and whether you can really ask them to make the sacrifice. What about your partner, your children or anyone else you live with? Make sure you talk it over with them and let them know what will be involved. But don’t leave out the benefits – give them a balanced picture.
  4. The job market There’s competition in most careers, but some are more competitive than others. Careers that are seen as glamorous can be difficult to get into without plenty of unpaid work experience, enthusiasm and some luck. Make sure you understand what it is going to take.
  5. Working conditions What will doing the job actually mean for your day-to-day? If it involves meeting lots of people and that’s not your thing, you might want to think again. Would you prefer a job indoors, or wouldn’t you mind being outside in the depths of winter?
  6. Plan your finances This is the big one. Switching careers usually involves a drop in salary, as you try to establish yourself in a new field. Are you and your family prepared to lower your outgoings, do without holidays, share a car or use some savings for a few years, if that is required?

Help with career planning

If you need support form a coach in making a decision about a career change, please get in touch. I wish you every success in making your decision and, if it is right for you, making your career change.

Wendy Mason is a career coach and writer.  She helps people reach their goals and aspirations, without sacrificing their home and personal life.  You can contact Wendy at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com and find out more at http://wisewolfcoaching.com

Other posts you might like to read

  • Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 1 Admit A Change is Needed

  • Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 2 Be Clear About The Change You Want

  • Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 3 Be Clear About What Is Troubling You

  • Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 4 Identify what is most difficult for you

  • Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 5 Select Your Goals for Change
  • Be Successful -Making A Personal Change – Part 6 Change Your Core Beliefs
  • Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 7 Learning To Accept Yourself
  • Changing Careers – Part 2 Finding the right career to suit you
  • Changing Careers – Part 1 Where To Start! A Checklist For Decision Making.

Changing Careers – Part 2 Finding the right career to suit you

Changing Careers – Part 2 Finding the right career to suit you

In Part 1 we thought about whether career change could benefit you, and suggested some questions that might help you to be clearer about your decision. While it can be tempting to skip straight from that to looking at specific careers, it’s often a good idea to spend some time first thinking about what motivates you as a person and what you really want?

This is Part 2 of a three part series;  In Part 1 we thought about whether career change could benefit you and suggested some questions that might help you to be clearer about your decision. In Part 3 we have a check list to help you make a final decision on whether you really should make the change

Think about your interests, inside and outside work – what are you looking for from a career? Once you’ve worked this out, you can start building up a picture of your ideal job and you can find out which careers match it most closely

Career planning: where to start!

Unless you’ve got a clear idea of what you want to do, it can be difficult to know where to start. And if you do have a career in mind, how do you know whether you’ve considered all your options?

As a starting point, you could try sitting down with a piece of paper and listing:

  • Courses you’ve taken in the past, or are taking now
  • Any jobs you’ve had, including voluntary work
  • Interests outside work
  • Any other significant experiences, like travelling

Then ask yourself:

  • Why you chose to do the things you have listed?
  • Which parts you really enjoyed?
  • Which parts you found frustrating or boring?
  • Which parts you were best at?
  • Which parts you found a challenge?
  • What have other people said about your contribution?
  • What other people have told you you’re good at?

You should start to see some patterns emerging; the types of skills you enjoy using, the sort of environment you perform best in and the types of people you like working with.

You can use this knowledge to help pinpoint areas of work you might enjoy.

Exploring types of careers

Once you have got an idea of areas you might want to work in, the next step is to check out some career profiles. These will give you information about the opportunities available in a particular line of work – and what skills and qualifications you’re likely to need.

You can find a range of job profiles at this link https://nationalcareersservice.direct.gov.uk/advice/planning/jobfamily/Pages/default.aspx

Help with career planning

If you need support form a coach in making a decision about a career change, please get in touch. Part 3 next week will be about things you need to consider like pay, location and getting the right qualifications.

Wendy Mason is a career coach and writer.  She helps people reach their goals and aspirations, without sacrificing their home and personal life.  You can contact Wendy at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com and find out more at http://wisewolfcoaching.com

Other posts you might like to read

  • Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 1 Admit A Change is Needed

  • Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 2 Be Clear About The Change You Want

  • Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 3 Be Clear About What Is Troubling You

  • Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 4 Identify what is most difficult for you

  • Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 5 Select Your Goals for Change
  • Be Successful -Making A Personal Change – Part 6 Change Your Core Beliefs
  • Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 7 Learning To Accept Yourself
  • Changing Careers – Part 1 Where To Start! A Checklist For Decision Making.

Changing Careers – Part 1 Where To Start! A Checklist For Decision Making.

Careers (board game)

Changing Careers – Part 1 Where To Start! A Checklist For Decision Making.

Is it time for you to make career change?

Changing careers isn’t easy. But nor is it as hard as you might imagine. I’ve done it four times in my life successfully. I’ve enjoyed the different careers at the time and I really was successful in each one. For me, there came a time to move on. Changing in this way has allowed me to come to terms with a changing economic environment and each new direction has built upon the experience and knowledge gained in the last one.

This is Part 1 of a three part series; In Part 2 we consider how you can start building up a picture of your ideal job and find out which careers match it most closely. In Part 3 we have a check list to help you decide whether you really should make the change

If you think a career change could benefit you, answering the following questions might help you to be clearer about your decision.

Are you actually enjoying your job, day by day?

If you’ve recently stopped enjoying the day-to-day activities in your job, consider why this may be. You may just be bored and need a new challenge in your present organization. You might think about moving to a different department. Or perhaps a change of employer might be the answer. 

If you actively dislike parts of your day-to-day job, ask yourself whether what you do is typical for someone in your type of work. Do you dislike the job because you don’t get the chance to use all of your talents? If you’re dissatisfied with the job itself, changing department or employer may not improve things. You may want to consider a more radical change.

Do you feel motivated by the people you work with?

How do you get on with colleagues, managers, clients and others in your workplace? Are any problems due to personality clashes with particular people or is it the culture of your workplace or the nature of the job itself? Do you like the people you work with but are frustrated by the actual work? If so, you may want to look at changing your role within the organisation or looking for a different role with a similar employer.

Are you satisfied with your work-life balance?

If you’re looking for a better fit with your family life, a change of job isn’t always necessary.

Technology is making it possible for more people to spend time working from home. You may have the right to ask your employer to make arrangements for flexible working. Your employer can refuse if there’s a good business reason to do so. But employers are becoming much more willing to consider flexible working?

Is the time right for you to take the risk?

If you have, for example, family responsibilities and others economically dependent on you, then changing now may mean putting others at risk. Also, are you prepared to risk what you have invested in your present role and possible loss of status, perhaps only temporary, in moving into a new field? You need to be very honest with yourself and with other people who may be effected by the change you want to make. In changing careers, timing is all; when you are dealing with lots of other changes in your life, this change may not be right for you at this time. 

If you need support form a coach in making a decision about a career change, please get in touch. Part 2 of this series next week will be about finding a new career to suit you.

Wendy Mason is a career coach and writer.  She helps people reach their goals and aspirations, without sacrificing their home and personal life.  You can contact Wendy at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com and find out more at http://wisewolfcoaching.com

Other posts you might like to read

  • Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 1 Admit A Change is Needed

  • Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 2 Be Clear About The Change You Want

  • Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 3 Be Clear About What Is Troubling You

  • Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 4 Identify what is most difficult for you

  • Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 5 Select Your Goals for Change
  • Be Successful -Making A Personal Change – Part 6 Change Your Core Beliefs
  • Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 7 Learning To Accept Yourself

Real people and personal problems at work

When you lead and manage you are dealing with people; real people with hopes, dreams and lives outside of work.

Years ago, managers, somewhat naively expected you to drop any consideration of the personal when you walked in through the office door.

No one ever did of course, they just suppressed their feelings about what was going on outside work.  Or they tried to!  Sometimes, with uncomfortable effects!  Many of us can tales of bosses who periodically became monsters and then you found out about the rows he was having with his wife.  In those days bosses were usually male.   In that world, all kinds of things went unsaid and unacknowledged.

These days, in most organizations, it is usually accepted that there will be times when the personal will impact on the professional.

In reality, most of us do know how to keep the two in balance.  But as a leader or a manager you need to recognise that personal life does impact on work.

For example, exhausted new parents suffering from lack of sleep due to a crying infant aren’t able to be as creative as they’d like. Workers who are dealing with problems at home often find their minds wandering, and don’t do their best work. Employees who are in pain — either physical or emotional — don’t operate at peak levels.

It is up to us to do our best to keep our employees functioning at their best at work and helping them to contribute when outside circumstances press upon them.   If they are valuable to the organization it is up to us to help them through some of the personal issues that interfere with their ability to do their best work.

Here are some tips;

1. Listen
Often it’s enough just to listen to the employee with a sympathetic ear – it really does help.  It isn’t up to us to solve their personal problems but we can show we care. .

2. Refer  

Many organizations these days offer a counselling service – this is the time to encourage an employee to take up what is on offer. Reassure them about privacy – this should be a requirement for any reputable counselling provider.  If nothing is available inside, then could you help them find a service outside of the organisation that they can access for themselves?  If the problem is medical then persuade them to see their physician

3. Accommodate short-term needs and be flexible.
This is the time to be flexible.  But if you are making special arrangements think through how this will impact on others and agree with the employee how long the arrangements will be in place. Agree how you will explain them to colleagues.   Give short-term time off if it’s needed (use vacation or sick time if it’s available), consider a more flexible working week (working four long days for example) and home working,

5. Temporarily assign an employee to different work that is better suited for the employee’s current state of mind.
This sounds dramatic but it may be the answer.  For example, someone who is under a lot of pressure may not be best placed right now to manage a very intense project.  Or for an employee who travels a lot for business, you may temporarily assign the employee to a job that requires little or no travel.

6. Make it clear what are short-term arrangements.
It’s important to make it clear to the employee what are short-term and temporary special arrangements and not a substantial change to the job.  It is best to put this in writing.  Don’t make it a threat — just make clear that that you’re willing to make these changes for a while to help.  Afterwards you will expect them to go back to delivering their previous level of performance.

7. Keep in touch with the employee during the crisis.
Monitor the situation to ensure that the employee is taking steps to resolve the situation. Provide encouragement and positive reinforcement along the way.

8. When the crisis has passed make sure the focus returns to work. 

Encourage and congratulate the employee on making it through a difficult time. But provide feedback if you think there is more to do to meet the needs of the work.  Provide assistance to help the employee get back the focus they may have lost. 

We are all individuals with our own personal strengths.   Management is about achieving business results with people and that means you have to work with people in the round.  This includes accepting that the personal will sometimes have to take priority over the professional.
Wendy Mason works as a personal and business coach, consultant and blogger. She has managed or advised on many different kinds of transition and she has worked with all kinds of people going through personal change. If you would like her help, email her at wendymason@wisewolfconsulting.com or ring ++44(0)2084610114 or ++44(0)7867681439