Successful Delegation

Successful Delegation

Delegation is one of the most important management skills. Good delegation saves you time, develops your people, can be used to groom a successor, and it motivates your team. Poor delegation will cause you and your team frustration – it de-motivates and confuses the other person, and fails to achieve the task. So it’s a management skill you need and that is worth improving. Here are some simple steps to follow to get it right.

Define the task

Confirm in your own mind that the task is suitable to be delegated. Does it meet the criteria for delegating? Make sure the task is

  • Specific
  • Measurable
  • Agreed
  • Realistic
  • Time-bound
  • Enjoyable, at the very least ethical, and worth doing!
  • Recorded

Select the individual or team

First consider why are you delegating to this particular person or team. What are they going to get out of it? What are you going to get out of it? Be clear about why you have chose this person!

Are they competent to do the task

Is the other person or team of people already capable of doing the task?  If not, can their training need be met in time to compete the task?

Explain the reasons

You must explain why the job or responsibility is being delegated. And why to that person or people? What is its importance and relevance? Where does it fit in the overall scheme of things? You need to give as much information as you can!

Be clear about the desired result

What must be achieved?  Make sure they have understood by getting feedback from the other person. How will the task be measured? Make sure they know how you intend to decide that the job has been done.  Be clear about the standard and quality you expect and how this will be judged. What reports will you require as the task is being completed? What methods of checking will you use – be clear at the outset and agree them with the person doing the task.  This will avoid later frustrations.

Consider the resources required

Discuss and agree what is required to get the job done. Consider people, location, premises, equipment, money, materials, other related activities and services. Make sure they are available. Nothing is more de-motivating than being given a task without the resources necessary to complete it.

Agree the deadlines

When must the job be finished? Or if it is an ongoing duty, when are the review dates? When are the reports due ? And if the task is complex and has parts or stages, what are the priorities?

Support and communicate

Think about who else needs to know what’s going on (stakeholders), and inform them. Involve the other person in considering this so they can see beyond the issue at hand. Do not leave the person to inform your own manager or your peers of their new responsibility. Warn the person about any awkward matters of office politics.

Give feedback on results

It is essential to let the person know how they are doing, and whether they have achieved their aims. If not, you must review with them why things did not go to plan, and deal with the problems. You must absorb the consequences of failure, and pass on the credit for success.

Publicize success

Nothing will motivate your team more than hearing about a member’s success and knowing others in your organisation know what has been achieved.  Reward and reinforce success by publicizing it – make opportunities to talk about it.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

TEN STEPS TO SUCCESSFUL DELEGATION

Delegation is one of the most important management skills. Good delegation saves you time, develops your people, can be used to groom a successor, and it motivates your team. Poor delegation will cause you and your team frustration – it de-motivates and confuses the other person, and fails to achieve the task. So it’s a management skill you need and that is worth improving. Here are some simple steps to follow to get it right.

1 Define the task

Confirm in your own mind that the task is suitable to be delegated. Does it meet the criteria for delegating? Is the task

  • Specific
  • Measurable
  • Agreed
  • Realistic
  • Time-bound
  • Enjoyable ideally or at least ethical in that it is worth doing!
  • Recorded
2 Select the individual or team

What are your reasons for delegating to this person or team? What are they going to get out of it? What are you going to get out of it? Be clear about why you have chose this person!

3 Are they competent to do the task?

Is the other person or team of people already capable of doing the task?  If not, can their training need be met in time to compete the task?

4 Explain the reasons

You must explain why the job or responsibility is being delegated. And why to that person or people? What is its importance and relevance? Where does it fit in the overall scheme of things? You need to give as much information as you can!

5. Be clear about the desired result

What must be achieved?  Make sure they have understood by getting feedback from the other person. How will the task be measured? Make sure they know how you intend to decide that the job has been done.  Be clear about the standard and quality you expect and how this will be judged. What reports will you require as the task is being completed? What methods of checking will you use – be clear at the outset and agree them with the person doing the task.  This will avoid later frustrations.

6 Consider the resources required

Discuss and agree what is required to get the job done. Consider people, location, premises, equipment, money, materials, other related activities and services. Make sure they are available. Nothing is more de-motivating than being given a task without the resources necessary to complete it.

7 Agree deadlines

When must the job be finished? Or if it is an ongoing duty, when are the review dates? When are the reports due ? And if the task is complex and has parts or stages, what are the priorities?

8 Support and communicate

Think about who else needs to know what’s going on (stakeholders), and inform them. Involve the other person in considering this so they can see beyond the issue at hand. Do not leave the person to inform your own manager or your peers of their new responsibility. Warn the person about any awkward matters of office politics.

9 Feedback on results

It is essential to let the person know how they are doing, and whether they have achieved their aims. If not, you must review with them why things did not go to plan, and deal with the problems. You must absorb the consequences of failure, and pass on the credit for success.

10 Publicize success

Nothing will motivate your team more than hearing about a member’s success and knowing others in your organisation know what has been achieved.  Reward and reinforce success by publicizing it  – make opportunities to talk about it.

GETTING READY FOR THE UPTURN

One thing is for certain, the recession will end and there will be an upturn in the economy!

What can we do?

  • For years in the “good times” we’ hoped for an island of calm – a period of consolidation to shore up the foundations. A chance to get those IT systems “sorted”, a chance to really look at costs and get even better deals with suppliers, exploit the the systems we have rather than add more systems, a chance to exploit Knowledge Management and show the value it can really deliver.  As an individual, a chance to get some training done or at least to read the latest business books and research on the internet.
  • It’s a time to review our approach to technology and where it is going.  How can we future proof our organisation and be ready to exploit what is available when the upturn appears. And not be chasing the pack trying to implement these systems when they are the norm and our firms are growing. Remember some of the new technologies now will be the next equivalent of corporate email (and email will probably be dead!). As an individual now is the time to educate ourselves about these new developments – social networking is an obvious example
  • Time to be wary and look after your remaining staff. Growth will bring churn into your departments, there will be opportunities galore for people as other firms grow and need to move beyond the skeleton staff they’ve had to operate with under current times. Your best people will be out the door first if they haven’t been “looked after”.  As an individual again begin to look out for the signs and prepare to be wanted again – what choices will you make for yourself?
  • Maybe now it’s time to use any downsizing to re-organise and refresh your teams, mould them for what’s to come. Not for what is now but for the future! How can you and your employees work more flexibly and be ready for future changes – how can you become more resilient?

But basically get out of the bunker, be creative and get ready! The upturn is coming!

Who goes first in a recession?

Who goes first in a recession?

Who goes first – below is a quote from a comment which appeared on the item below on another website from an employer who had just had to lay people off.  I suspect the approach taken would be illegal in the UK but it does show how some people think.

Who goes first – this is the order in which he/she would let people go!  I want to know what you think!

“1. Those who cost the company more than they produce. It doesn’t matter how smart and educated you are, if you are expensive and you, and your department, don’t bring a lot of money into your company, you may be let go. Go into sales or another highly productive department.

2. The selfish. The whiners. The unlikable. Those with bad attitudes about what they will or will not do to help the company.

3. Consultants. They make big money and have no loyalty, nor do they carry any specific responsibility.

4. Sales people on a high base salary who are not hitting their sales goals.

Who will keep their jobs to the bitter end?

1. Loyal, positive people who are cross-trained in every area of the company. People who can “do it all.”

2. The Accounting manager, Customer Service manager, the Accounts Receivable/Bookkeeper, and a really smart webmaster. Why? Because accounting people can also run the warehouse shipping system, and can pack and ship if need be. The customer service manager can handle every part of the ordering system.

3. Commissioned sales people, or sales people on a very low base salary.

Who will be the next people to go?

People who produce new product ideas. If our economy goes down the tubes, no one will buy the product without massive marketing money. So it may be best to market what we already have. No point in investing very much toward an uncertain future. Put out a minimum of new product, but cut the rest.”

Is this how others think?  What do employees think of the priorities.  Views please.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

WHO GOES FIRST IN A RECESSION AND WHO STAYS – YOUR VIEWS PLEASE

Who goes first?  Below is a quote from a comment which appeared on the item below on another website from an employer who had just had to lay people off.  I suspect the approach taken would be illegal in the UK but it does show how some people think.

This is the order in which he/she would let people go!  We want to know what you think!

“1. Those who cost the company more than they produce. It doesn’t matter how smart and educated you are, if you are expensive and you and your department don’t bring a lot of money into your company, you may be let go. Go into sales or another highly productive department.

2. The selfish. The whiners. The unlikable. Those with bad attitudes about what they will or will not do to help the company.

3. Consultants. They make big money and have no loyalty, nor do they carry any specific responsibility.

4. Sales people on a high base salary who are not hitting their sales goals.

Who will keep their jobs to the bitter end?

1. Loyal, positive people who are cross trained in every area of the company. People who can “do it all.”

2. My Accounting manager, Customer Service manager, the Accounts Receivable/Bookkeeper, and a really smart webmaster. Why? Because my accounting people can also run the warehouse shipping system, and can pack and ship if need be. My customer service manager can handle every part of the ordering system.

3. Commissioned sales people, or sales people on a very low base salary.

Who will be the next people to go?
People who produce new product ideas. If our economy goes down the tubes, no one will buy the product without massive marketing dollars. So it may be best to market what we already have. No point in investing very much toward an uncertain future. Put out a minimum of new product, but cut the rest.”

Is this how others think?  What do emplyees think of the priorities.  Views please.

Part Time Working or Redundancy in a Recession

The recession is hitting some sectors and some people harder than other others. People over 50 are more likely to be targeted while graduate recruitment has slowed. But the impact of the recession is leading more employers to think about the benefits of flexible working and hopefully this will last into the upturn. If you can offer part- time working to skilled workers it is a better option than losing them through redundancy.

If you work in an organization where redundancy threatens and you have not been offered part-time working, it’s worth considering making the suggestion. Living on a reduced income isn’t fun but if you can make it through, it might be the best way of weathering this particular storm. The extra spare time can give you a lot of options. More time with the family is obvious. But this is also the time for training to bring your skills up to date and for gaining new skills. You might launch out into some kind of new business – yes even in a recession its worth thinking about. If you are forced into redundancy then all these options apply too – lots of successful small businesses got started with redundancy money – people ended up doing what they had always wanted! Having said all that of course it’s hard – but there are lots of us around who are able and willing to help.

If you have been offered part-time or other flexible working packages, I would love to hear from you.

If you are facing redundancy and want to swap some ideas then get in touch!

Five steps to better flexible working – Management Today

Bringing in a flexible working policy is a lot easier said than done – so MT asked Susan Yallop, a director at recruitment Adecco, to give us her five top tips for making it work within your business.

Full article at  Five steps to better flexible working – Management Today.