Networking Tips to Help Your Job Search

Networking Tips to Help Your Job Search

Networking – if you are a new job seeker it might surprise you to learn that 60% networkingof jobs are never advertised.  That means that most vacancies are filled by word of mouth. There are filled through networking.

Why are so few vacancies advertised?

Advertising costs a lot of money.  And then it takes a lot of time to sort through application forms and CVs and even more resource to interview candidates. All this can be avoided by promoting from within the organisation or by employing people who are known to them. Some organisations actively encourage their staff to refer friends with suitable skills and most are happy to receive introductions to, or approaches from, good people.

How do I begin?

Most people are anxious about networking if they’ve never done it before. Taking an organised approach and working to your plan can help you feel more confident.

Steps to networking!

  1. Make a list of the people you know – including the sector they work in and who they might know.
  2. Look out for contacts and networks that relate to your own sector – check out industry conferences, events and forums.
  3. Exploit the possibilities of social networking. Join business networking sites such as LinkedIn. Look for relevant groups and organisations on social networking sites including Facebook. You could consider establishing your own networking group on LinkedIn or Facebook.
  4. Plan your approach. Have a clear idea of who you want to talk to or make contact with at events and online. Think about why you are interested in the organisation and why you’re approaching them.
  5. Do your homework. When approaching an individual or organisation try to research what they do. LinkedIn and Facebook are great tools for researching people. Get to understand their culture and the language of the sector they work in.
  6. Focus on what you can offer. Before setting up a networking meeting, think about what you can do for them. Could you suggest a contact that might help their business or offer to help out with a busy project they are involved in? Do you have specialist advice to offer?
  7. Tailor your communication. Don’t send out the same version of your speculative application letter or CV to all organisations. Make sure they are tailored to the organisation and show how your skills are relevant.
  8. Keep records.  Keep an excel spreadsheet or a notebook listing contacts,to whom you’ve spoken or written.  And include their contact details and their position as well as how you are going to follow up. This record can be invaluable if your contacts get in touch at a later date.
  9. Be yourself. The most important parts of networking are to be yourself and to treat other people with courtesy and respect. You don’t have to have overwhelming confidence – just remember other people at networking events may be feeling just like you. Show a real interest in other people and start a conversation, and then follow up; you will become a good net-worker and it will pay dividends.
  10. Remember, networking is 60% about giving (your time, interest and energy) and only 40% about getting

If you need support in developing the confidence to network please get in touch.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

Job Search – Networking Tips

Job Search – Networking Tips

Wendy Mason is a Career Coach and Life Coach helping you find fresh perspectives on life and your career

If you are a new job seeker it might surprise you to learn that 60% of jobs are never advertised.  That means that most vacancies are filled by word of mouth or by networking.

Why are so few vacancies advertised?

Advertising costs a lot of money.  And then it takes a lot of time to sort through application forms and CVs and even more resource to interview candidates. All this can be avoided by promoting from within the organisation or by employing people who are known to them. Some organisations actively encourage their staff to refer friends with suitable skills and most are happy to receive introductions to, or approaches from, good people.

How do I begin?

Most people are anxious about networking if they’ve never done it before. Taking an organised approach and working to your plan can help you to get over your nerves.

Steps to networking!

  1. Make a list of the people you know – including the sector they work in and who they might know.
  2. Look out for networks that relate to your own sector – check out industry conferences, events and forums.
  3. Exploit the possibilities of social networking. Join business networking sites such as LinkedIn; look for relevant groups and organisations on social networking sites including Facebook.  You could consider establishing your own networking group on LinkedIn or Facebook.
  4. Plan your approach. Have a clear idea of who you want to talk to or make contact with at events and online; why you are interested in the organisation and why you’re approaching them.
  5. Do your homework. When approaching an individual or organisation, be sure to research what they do. LinkedIn is a great tool for researching people. Get to understand their culture and the language of the sector they work in.
  6. Focus on what you can offer. Before setting up a networking meeting, think about what you can do for them. Could you suggest a contact that might help their business or offer to help out with a busy project they are involved in? Do you have specialist advice to offer?
  7. Tailor your communication. Don’t send out the same version of your speculative application letter or CV to all organisations. Make sure they are tailored to the organisation and show how your skills are relevant.
  8. Keep records.   Keep an excel spreadsheet or a notebook listing contacts, who you’ve spoken to or written to, their contact details and their position and how you are going to follow up. This record can be invaluable if your contacts get in touch at a later date.
  9. Be yourself. The most important parts of networking are to be yourself and to treat other people with courtesy and respect. You don’t have to have overwhelming confidence – just remember other people at networking events may be feeling just like you. Show a real interest in other people and start a conversation, and then follow up; you will become a good networker and it will pay dividends.

If you need support in developing the confidence to network please get in touch.

Wendy Mason is a Career Coach and Life Coach helping you find fresh perspectives on life and your career.
wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com 
http://wisewolfcoaching.com

  • Job Search Strategy: Who do you want to be?
  • Job Search: Make sure you include your personal profile/summary in your CV

Solve Problems at Work Quickly and Efficiently by Using Online Forums and Communities

Solve Problems at Work Quickly and Efficiently by Using Online Forums and Communities

Today we have another guest post from Tamara M. Williams who writes career articles based on her personal and work experience. She shares tips so that readers can take the necessary steps to develop their careers further She also writes articles for EzineArticles and Squidoo on topics such as Technology, Marketing and Entertainment.

There are some days when you try to solve a problem, but still come up short. Online research is usually the best method to try in order to demonstrate your initiative in solving various problems. Yet not all solutions are readily available on Google. Instead, these problems will sometimes cause you to search multiple pages, only to become frustrated with the endless results of irrelevant information. Hence, joining various online forums and communities to learn from and ask question to will help you to solve problems quickly and more efficiently.

Imagine your typical workday when a problem arises. You search Google to no avail so you take the next logical step, which would be to ask colleagues or your supervisor for ideas. You could also ask them to provide a suggestion on where to look for past projects that had similar issues. In addition, trying a brainstorm session may work since multiple persons are contributing and revising ideas. Sometimes this works, but sometimes the problems are far more complicated.

That is why further research should be conducted and various ideas discussed within relevant online forums or communities. The typical places to look are on LinkedIn, Facebook, and Google+. Just search using keywords until you come across the most appropriate group to join.

You can also dig a bit deeper by going to forums hosted by your professional associates or popular industry websites. These forums have numerous experts in the field that are available throughout the day. Members post a variety of issues far more frequently that in regular social media communities. Search these forums using a variety of keywords and test the suggested solutions to determine if one will work for you. You will also have the chance to offer assistance to others who are having difficulty solving problems that you have already faced and resolved. This will help you to build a network of experts to contact in your field.

By taking advantage of the wealth of knowledge and online presence of members in these mediums, you are able to get higher quality information and solutions more quickly. This will reduce your frustration since less time is spent on problem solving and now you can easily move on to the next phase of your project.

About the Author

Tamara M. Williams writes career articles based on her personal and work experience. She shares tips so that readers can take the necessary steps to develop their careers further. She also writes articles for EzineArticles and Squidoo on topics such as Technology, Marketing and Entertainment.

Also by Tamara

Career Success:Assess Your Work Expenses Every Month to Ensure That You Live Within Your Budget

Productivity Tip: Improve Your Productivity at Work by Keeping Notes for Every Project You Work on

 

Low Job Search Periods

Low Job Search Periods

Job Search at Holiday Time

By Wendy Mason Career Coach and Life Coach►helping you find fresh perspectives on life and your career

Low Job Search Periods! Regular job hunters and those in the recruitment industry recognise two periods when there can be something of a lull in the job market. One is during the summer holiday period and the other is from the beginning of December until mid-January.

Yes, it gets tougher but this isn’t the time to take your eye off the ball. There are likely to be some opportunities around and who knows who you might meet over the Christmas period and what opportunities they may know about.

Having said that though, this might by the time to review and update your CV. Always think about what the recruiter wants to find out – and give it to them, clearly and near the beginning of your CV. Most recruiters scan CVs very quickly and what you say at the top of the first page is all important.

This might be the time as well to further explore social networking. How much do you know about using

lPhoto credit: Inmobiliaria Lares, Cangas)

Twitter and Facebook and are you fully exploiting the possibilities of LinkedIn? Advertising jobs is costly to companies, so many recruit through social media. That makes joining the big three (LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook) lots of sense. Make sure you keep any dodgy Facebook pictures private, though.

Why not showcase your capabilities on line as well. Now might be the time to write some guest posts. Lots of blog owners (including me) welcome a well written article at any time of the year. I’m always on the lookout for 300 to 500 words on leadership, management, job search or career development. Guest bloggers take the burden off me to produce good content several times a week.

Take part in LinkedIn discussions too. They will continue over the Christmas period. Show people just what you have to contribute.

(Photo credit: Wikipedia)

And don’t forget about chatting to recruiters informally and keeping up to date with their companies. That is a great way to find out about jobs before anyone else. Get on Twitter or LinkedIn and connect with them; make sure you wish them the compliments of the season, too. You have nothing to lose and you may have plenty to gain.

I wish all those starting out on, or a continuing, a job search this week every success and if I can help, please get in touch.

Remember I offer a trial free half hour coaching session by phone or Skype.

Warm regards

Wendy
wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com
http://wisewolfcoaching.com

  • Job Search: Make sure you include your personal profile/summary in your CV
  • Career Development: So you want to sit at the top table – learn to take a broad view!
  • Job Search and Career Development – Top 10 Tips On How To Work A Crowd

Job Search at Holiday Time

Job Search at Holiday Time

Advice from Wendy Smith. Wendy is a Career and Life Coach helping you find fresh perspectives on life and your career.  You can book a FREE coaching session or find out more at this link

Job Search at holiday time – regular job hunters and those in the recruitment industry recognise two periods when there can be something of a lull in the job market. One is during the summer holiday period and the other is from the beginning of December until mid-January.

Yes, it gets tougher but this isn’t the time to take your eye off the ball. There are likely to be some opportunities around and who knows who you might meet over the Christmas period and what opportunities they may know about.

Having said that though, this might by the time to review and update your CV. Always think about what the recruiter wants to find out – and give it to them, clearly and near the beginning of your CV. Most recruiters scan CVs very quickly and what you say at the top of the first page is all important.

This might be the time as well to further explore social networking. How much do you know about using

lPhoto credit: Inmobiliaria Lares, Cangas)

Twitter and Facebook and are you fully exploiting the possibilities of LinkedIn? Advertising jobs is costly to companies, so many recruit through social media. That makes joining the big three (LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook) lots of sense. Make sure you keep any dodgy Facebook pictures private, though.

Why not showcase your capabilities on line as well. Now might be the time to write some guest posts. Lots of blog owners (including me) welcome a well written article at any time of the year. I’m always on the lookout for 300 to 500 words on leadership, management, job search or career development. Guest bloggers take the burden off me to produce good content several times a week.

Take part in LinkedIn discussions too. They will continue over the Christmas period. Show people just what you have to contribute.

(Photo credit: Wikipedia)

And don’t forget about chatting to recruiters informally and keeping up to date with their companies. That is a great way to find out about jobs before anyone else. Get on Twitter or LinkedIn and connect with them; make sure you wish them the compliments of the season, too. You have nothing to lose and you may have plenty to gain.

I wish all those starting out on, or a continuing, a job search this week every success and if I can help, please get in touch.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in helping people lead happier lives and feel more fulfilled. She has worked in management as well as coaching and personal development, as well as starting up her own businesses. That means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up a new business or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book a FREE coaching session with Wendy or find out more at this link

 

Using Social Media for Job Search

Using Social Media for Job Search

Using social media – we all know by now that networking is one of the most important parts of job search. But not all of us are confident about using social media. This is a pity because social media sites will play an increasing role in networking, career advancement, and professional success in the future. If you are a reluctant user of social networking, I hope these tips will help.

Remember that most, if not everything, you do on-line stays there forever. And most can probably be found fairly easily by a potential employer.  So make sure everything you do and write on-line is compatible with the image you want potential employers to see.

Using Social Media – Sites to Consider

LinkedIn

Join LinkedIn if you have not already done so.  Have a look at the profiles of leaders in your professional field and the approach they have taken.  Fill out your profile with an eye to recording your achievements and making yourself an attractive job prospect. Find friends and former colleagues to connect with and join groups that represent you professional interest. You can join up to 50 groups and you can connect with other group members. Take part in group discussions to show your expertise. Update your status with useful links and information for others – become a resource. Do not head up your profile with “looking for work.” But use keywords related to the kind of work you are looking for in your profile. This will attract recruiters.

Facebook

More and more people every day seem to be using Facebook for professional networking. Although personally I have some reservations about its suitability.  Do not mix social and professional networking on Facebook. Use the security features on Facebook with great care. And choose your Friends wisely. Remember your Friends can usually see information about your other Friends in your Profile. Be careful about amount and type of information that you share.  Make sure you post only what you want business contacts or prospective employers to see. And post content relevant to your job search or career. Again, you can demonstrate your expertise.  Facebook can showcase you in the round for a potential employer. That, properly managed, is positive.

Twitter

Twitter is what is known as a microblogging service. You can, and people do, write messages to change the world in 140 characters. Twitter is open-ended and people. And companies use it in a variety of ways, including recruitment. But in 140 characters or less, it’s tough to apply for a job! However, you can tell colleagues and employers that you are looking. Find contacts and recruiters on Twitter. The begin to follow them to see new opportunities.  Follow companies and organizations that you would like to work for. And then find out what they are up to.  Post useful links and information as well as interactingwith others. Twitter is all about conversations, not broadcasting! You can find me on Twitter as @WWisewolf

Using social media can help you to create your professional brand and build your on-line presence strategically  to help with your job searching and career.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

Job Search – Using Social Media

Job Search – Using Social Media

We all know by now that networking is one of the most important parts of job search. But not all of us are confident about using social media. This is a pity because social media sites will play an increasing role in networking, career advancement, and professional success in the future. If you are a reluctant user of social networking, I hope these tips will help.

Remember that most, if not everything, you do on-line stays there forever and most can probably be found fairly easily by a potential employer.  So make sure everything you do and write on-line is compatible with the image you want that  potential employer to form.

LinkedIn

Join LinkedIn if you have not already done so.  Have a look at the profiles of leaders in your professional field and the approach they have taken.  Fill out your profile with an eye to recording your achievements and making yourself an attractive job prospect. Find friends and former colleagues to connect with and join groups that represent you professional interest.  You can join up to 50 groups and you can connect with other group members. Take part in group discussions to show your expertise and update your status with useful links and information for others – become a resource. Do not head up your profile with “looking for work” but use keywords related to the kind of work you are looking for in your profile to attract recruiters.

Facebook

More and more people every day seem to be using Facebook for professional networking, although personally I have some reservations.  Do not mix social and professional networking on Facebook and choose your Friends wisely. Remember your Friends can see information about your other Friends in your Profile. Be careful of the amount and type of information that you share.  Make sure you post only what you want business contacts or prospective employers to see and post content relevant to your job search or career. Again you can demonstrate your expertise.  Facebook can showcase you in the round for a potential employer and that, properly managed, is positive.

Twitter

Twitter is a social networking and what is known as a microblogging service – you can and people do write messages to change the world in 140 characters. Twitter is open-ended and people and companies use it in a variety of ways, including to job search. But in 140 characters or less, it’s tough to apply for a job! However, you can tell colleagues and employers that you are looking. Find contacts and recruiters on Twitter and begin to follow them to see new opportunities.  Follow companies and organizations that you would like to work for to find out what they are up to.  Post useful links and information and interact with others – Twitter is all about conversations! You can find me on Twitter as @WWisewolf

Use social networking sites to create your professional brand and build your on-line presence strategically  to help with your job searching and career.

Wendy is the The Career Coach – helping you to find fresh perspectives on your Job Search and Career. She helps you work towards your goals and aspirations, in a way that fits in with both work and home life. Email her at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com,  find her on Skype at wendymason14, or call +44 (0) 2081239146 (02081239146 for UK callers) or +1 262 317 9016 if you are in the US.

Book a free trial/consultation to try phone coaching from the comfort of your own home 

Job Search: Asking For A Job Referral

Job Search: Asking For A Job Referral

When you are interested in a job and someone refers you, you can mention that asking for a job referralin your covering letter.  It will mean you start ahead of the field.  Having a referral is having a recommendation.

When you identify a job you wish to apply for check your network for contacts with the right connections. LinkedIn is great for this. And, if you can find someone who already works for the company you wish to apply to that is great.

As well as LinkedIn, you can also use tools like BranchOut which is a Facebook app. It helps you find your friends at companies you are interested in. Search by company name and you’ll see a list of your Facebook friends at the company. Then, you can approach them to  see if they are willing to help.

You can approach contacts in a number of ways

  • An old-fashioned letter,
  • an email message,
  • Sending a message on a networking site like LinkedIn or Facebook or by, for example, Skype.

It is usually better to ask in writing rather than by phone. That means your contact has time to think about your request and how they can refer you. It is fair to give them the opportunity to refuse. And that is easier to do in writing

When you ask someone to refer you, you are not asking for a reference letter.  But, they do need to know something about you to refer with confidence.  You can ask “Do you feel you know my work well enough to refer me for a job at your company?” Or, “Do you feel you could give me a referral?” That way, they have an out if they don’t feel comfortable. And, you can be assured that those who do refer you will be enthusiastic about your performance. They will write a positive letter or give you a strong endorsement.

You could always offer to provide an updated copy of your resume and information on your skills and experiences. This is so your contact has the right information to work with.

Don’t take it personally if your contact says no!

Don’t take it personally if your contact says no. There could be all kinds of reasons for their refusal and lots that have nothing to do with you.

But don’t feel diffident about making your request. People usually feel flattered to be asked. And if you are asked to make a referral, do your best to help. Though, don’t duck away from refusing if you don’t feel comfortable. Perhaps, you know the person they want to contact will not welcome the approach.

Remember, job search is about giving as well as getting, Build your network with generosity to others. That way you are likely to be remembered with kindness when you need help.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

A Checklist For Your Personal brand

Image via Wikipedia

September and a new term begins.  Time to reassess and refresh your personal brand!  The world sees your personal brand in all you do; it can work for you or against you.    

Sometime ago I posted a Checklist for your Personal Brand on Wisewolf Talking. Here is an updated version.

1. Do you have credibility? Are you an expert in your subject?  Do people believe you know what you are talking about?  Do the words you use reflect the latest thinking on your subject?  Do you write articles and blog posts on your specialist interest? Does your resume reflect the real depth of your experience – is it up to date?

2. Do you have an introductory piece – an ‘elevator speech?  Can you deliver a succinct description of what you do, how you do it differently, plus the benefit it delivers, within the time that it takes an elevator to travel one floor?

3. Are you a convincing communicator? Do people believe what you say and act on your advice?  Why not do a market survey – choose three people you trust and ask them what they think!  If not, then read a book or take a class.

4. Do you dress for the job?  Do you know what the dress code is for your sector?  Do you follow it?  But what about off duty – if you met you boss in the supermarket, what impression would they get?  Think about what is appropriate to the situation – balance your individual style with clothing that will appeal to those you are trying to impress.

5. Do you know the etiquette for your organization and your sector?  How do people behave? What kind of business cards do people carry?  Be the one who follows up and says thank you after sector and professional events.

6. Do you know the people you need to impress?  Take time out to build your address book.  Collect business cards – make sure your card reflects your image properly!  Ask contacts for further introductions.  Use LinkedInTwitterand Facebook to find new people.

7. Do you nurture your network?  Do you work at nurturing your relationship with your contacts?  Do you show an active interest in them and genuinely care about them?  Ask how they are and what they are doing and mean it.  Remember things they tell you – note them down if you need to! People appreciate real attention but they know when you are being insincere.

8. What do you do with your spare time?  If you give something back to the community with voluntary work or help your local sports club – the news does get around!

Your personal brand is precious – it’s the “you” that the world sees and judges you by.  Nurture your brand and you will nurture your life and your career.

Related articles

A Checklist For Your Personal Brand

Image via Wikipedia

September and a new term begins.  Time to reassess and refresh your personal brand!  The world sees your personal brand in all you do; it can work for you or against you.    

Sometime ago I posted a Checklist for your Personal Brand on Wisewolf Talking. Here is an updated version.

1. Do you have credibility? Are you an expert in your subject?  Do people believe you know what you are talking about?  Do the words you use reflect the latest thinking on your subject?  Do you write articles and blog posts on your specialist interest? Does your resume reflect the real depth of your experience – is it up to date?

2. Do you have an introductory piece – an ‘elevator speech?  Can you deliver a succinct description of what you do, how you do it differently, plus the benefit it delivers, within the time that it takes an elevator to travel one floor?

3. Are you a convincing communicator? Do people believe what you say and act on your advice?  Why not do a market survey – choose three people you trust and ask them what they think!  If not, then read a book or take a class.

4. Do you dress for the job?  Do you know what the dress code is for your sector?  Do you follow it?  But what about off duty – if you met you boss in the supermarket, what impression would they get?  Think about what is appropriate to the situation – balance your individual style with clothing that will appeal to those you are trying to impress.

5. Do you know the etiquette for your organization and your sector?  How do people behave? What kind of business cards do people carry?  Be the one who follows up and says thank you after sector and professional events.

6. Do you know the people you need to impress?  Take time out to build your address book.  Collect business cards – make sure your card reflects your image properly!  Ask contacts for further introductions.  Use LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook to find new people.

7. Do you nurture your network?  Do you work at nurturing your relationship with your contacts?  Do you show an active interest in them and genuinely care about them?  Ask how they are and what they are doing and mean it.  Remember things they tell you – note them down if you need to! People appreciate real attention but they know when you are being insincere.

8. What do you do with your spare time?  If you give something back to the community with voluntary work or help your local sports club – the news does get around!

Your personal brand is precious – it’s the “you” that the world sees and judges you by.  Nurture your brand and you will nurture your life and your career.