Refresh Your Job Search

Refresh Your Job Search

Refresh Your Job Search

Refresh Your Job Search – Have you been searching for a new job for a while now?  Hard isn’t it to keep up that energy?  But there are new and exciting opportunities out there, if you can re-energise your quest. Here are some tips to help you refresh your job search.

Update your image and your attitude.

Give your confidence a boost – revamp your image!  How about a new hairstyle?Consider a new style of dress.  What kind of change could you make as an outward sign that something has changed? Make a change to represent the new you and your new approach.

Work hard on your commitment to positive thinking and your self-belief. If you catch yourself thinking negatively, stop in your tracks. Have a day when negative thinking and doubt is not allowed in your life. Give yourself a holiday from worry! Catch any negative thinking and flip it over in mind. Think of yourself not so much as looking for a job but, rather, looking for an opportunity to add value. You know that given the right opportunity, that is exactly what you will do. Think every day about the benefits that you will bring to your new employer.

Revamp Your CV/Résumé

An important step in every job search is to equip yourself with a CV that really demonstrates you, your skills and your abilities. How good is your CV?  Take time now to check it and remember this CV is just a baseline that you will tailor for each new role.  Show evidence of your ability to deliver. Get in touch with me if you would like some advice on re-vamping your CV.

Consider new options

Time to think about radical new options. Changing careers isn’t easy. Nor is it as hard as you might imagine. I’ve done it successfully four times in my life. I enjoyed each career at the time. But there came a time to consider new options. Changing this way has helped me to come to terms with a changing economic environment. Each new direction built upon the experience and knowledge gained in the last one. Get in touch if you would like some advice on things to consider when considering a career change.

Find New Ways to Network

Find new people to network with using social media.  Are you making the most of sites like LinkedIn?  Are you approaching social networking seriously? It can provide lots of new opportunities. Brush up both general and social networking skills  – there is lots of advice around.

Find yourself a coach

A Career Coach will work with you on all the practical aspects of applying for work.  The coach will help you to look at your achievements and results so far. You will learn how you can build on them to make your next career move work out well. A good coach will help you build your confidence and maximise your chances of landing the right job.

Looking for a new job is a big challenge. But with a positive attitude and the right tools and support, you can be successful. You will find lots of resources here on this blog. And I offer a free half hour consultation, so get in touch. I will be happy to show you how career coaching can make that essential difference to your job search.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

Job Search – Stand Out From the Crowd

Job Search – Stand Out From the Crowd

job search - standout from the crowd

Job Search – Stand Out From the Crowd – This post is about applying for advertised vacancies for which you are in competition. Unfortunately, in the present climate, job seeking is intensely competitive.  There are usually many applicants for every advertised post.  That’s is why networking to find work is so important.

When you submit a written application, with or without a CV/Résumé, what matters most is that you convince the recruiter that you meet the criteria for the vacancy.  Include relevant keywords that will stand out like head lights – you can find out more about job search keywords at this link.

Once you get to the interview stage, you are up against others who havea lso shown on paper that they meet the requirements. The interview and your references will show whether what you have said on paper in valid.  And at interview stage you need to stand out from the crowd.

Standing out from the crowd is not without risks.

Job Search – Stand Out From the Crowd – Take into account the culture of the organization when deciding how to make your mark.  When deciding what to wear for the interview, for example, knowing the company dress code is important.  If it is casual then make sure you wear very smart casual attire.  No, you don’t want be so bland that you sink into the wall paper. Wearing, for example, a smart but distinctive tie, scarf or piece of jewellery, can help the interviewers remember you.  The “something distinctive “needs to be chosen with great care and very good taste!

The interview is also an opportunity to show clearly that you will bring added value beyond that required by the job specification.  Show that added value with care. And make sure that what you say is relevant to the questions that you are being asked and to the job.

You can stand out by showing your enthusiasm. Being actively engaged in the process and showing real interest in the organization impresses. Be interested in what the interviewers have to say to you.

Prepare well!

The impression you want to make is that you are intelligent, highly competent and likely to be an asset to the organization and to your future work colleagues.

Make sure that you get a good night’s sleep before the interview.  Do your best to arrive in plenty of time.  You want to be bright-eyed and relaxed – not red-faced and slightly out of breath.

You want to be remembered but for all the right reasons!

Make sure you do your home work. Find out all you can you can about the job, the organization and the people you are likely to meet. Treat them with courtesy and work hard to show evidence that you are the person best able to do the job.

If you would like support in your job search please get in touch.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

Writing That Winning CV

Writing That Winning CV

Writing That Winning CV – a CV that is going to win you the job is the one that makes the reader want to know more about you. The CV that makes it much more likely that you will be invited to an interview! Your CV needs to show the recruiter that you will be best fitted to to meet their requirements. Good CVs are valuable and a very good investment of your time.

So how do you make yourself stand-out from the crowd?

Any CV that you write is only relevant if it shows how you meet the requirements of the particular role. So be ready to tailor you generic CV for each post. Be specific about skills, experience and personal qualities. Show that you understand their requirements.

These days employers and recruiter receive sacks full of CVs. Make sure yours short (no more than two sides of A4 if possible), easy to read and attractive.

Lay it out clearly with enough space and clear section headings.

Your CV shows what you bring to the organization

Your CV shows what you bring to the organization, so make it look professional.

  • Choose a clear, professional font that is easy to read (e.g. Arial, Calibri, Times New Roman)
  • Make no typing mistakes – CVs with typos get “binned”. A simple spell check is not enough: ask someone else to proof-read your finished CV
  • Have clear headings (key skills, work experience, education etc) so that these can be scanned quickly
  • Order your experience and education into reverse chronological order with the latest first.
  • For recent posts, show what you achieved and delivered for each post
  • Concentrate on the last 10 years and sum-up earlier experience briefly.

Many recruiters’ job sites search candidates’ CVs for specific keywords. It is important to include those which are likely to apply for the particular job. Create clear statements that demonstrate your skills and what you deliver, using terms that show you as positive and pro-active.

These are positive keywords, you could use to describe your personal attributes

  • Accurate
  • Adaptable
  • Confident
  • Friendly
  • Hard-working
  • Innovative
  • Pro-active
  • Reliable
  • Responsible
  • Intelligent
  • Experienced

When describing your experience and achievement use pro-active descriptions like:

  • Achieved
  • Formulated
  • Planned
  • Broadened
  • Generated
  • Managed
  • Represented
  • Completed
  • Implemented
  • Shaped
  • Delivered
  • Saved

If you have saved an organization money or generated new business, flag it up with figures and facts.

I know you can get that job you have been hoping for and I would like to help you. Email me wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com now to arrange a free half hour coaching session by Skype.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

 

How to Become Your Resume

How to Become Your Resume

Your resume! On paper, you’re the perfect candidate. So, how do you make the same impression in person?

Here is some advice. For example:

Divide your time on a two-to-one ratio. For every hour you spend on the mechanics of interview preparation, researching the company, your route and means of travel, wardrobe preparation, etc., spend two hours with your resume and preparing for questions.

Read more at this link

Your CV Summary for Job Search

Your CV Summary for Job Search

CV summary – you would be surprised how many CVs I see that do not include a short personal profile at the top of the first page. Instead they plunge straight into the work history giving the reader not a clue about the person doing the work.These kinds of CV are much less likely to catch a recruiter/future employer’s eye.

So what should you include in your short summary?

Your personal profile should summarise your;
• Skills and qualities
• Work background and achievements
• Career aims.

It should only be a few lines and must grab the reader’s attention. Try to avoid using terms that a lot of candidates will use, such as ‘reliable’, ‘hard working’, ‘team player’, ‘good communication skills’ etc. These general terms are heard so often they don’t help an employer to build up a real picture of you.

Instead, for example, if the job involves working with people, try to highlight relevant, specific people skills such as: negotiating, dealing with demanding customers, presentation skills, resolving conflict, or showing empathy. These help the reader build up more of a picture than saying you’re a good team-worker and an effective communicator. However, be brief – you can highlight examples of your skills in later sections.

Include keywords relevant to the kind of work you seek or are applying for. (When someone uses a search engine, they type in one or more words describing what they are looking for; eg ‘Facilities Manager’ or ‘Corporate Real Estate”. These words or phrases are known as keywords.) Many recruitment companies make use of software to sift job applications based on a keyword search.

When you’re summarising your career aims, think about the employer you are sending your CV to. It will hit home with employers if your career aims sound exactly like the kind of opportunities they currently have or are likely to provide in future.

Try to relate your summary to the job description or, if you’re sending your CV on spec, what you think the employer is looking for.

I wish all those starting out on, or a continuing, a job search this week every success and if I can help, please get in touch.

Remember I offer a trial free half hour coaching session by phone or Skype.

Warm regards

Wendy
wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com
http://wisewolfcoaching.com

  • Job Search – Please Write Those Important STAR Stories
  • Career Development: When it is time for a change!
  • Career Development: When You Have to Reapply For Your Own Job

Job Search: Make sure you include your personal profile/summary in your CV

Job Search: Make sure you include your personal profile/summary in your CV

You would be surprised how many CVs I see that do not include a short personal profile at the top of the first page. Instead they plunge straight into the work history giving the reader not a clue about the person doing the work.These kinds of CV are much less likely to catch a recruiter/future employer’s eye.

So what should you include in your short summary?

Your personal profile should summarise your;
• Skills and qualities
• Work background and achievements
• Career aims.

It should only be a few lines and must grab the reader’s attention. Try to avoid using terms that a lot of candidates will use, such as ‘reliable’, ‘hard working’, ‘team player’, ‘good communication skills’ etc. These general terms are heard so often they don’t help an employer to build up a real picture of you.

Instead, for example, if the job involves working with people, try to highlight relevant, specific people skills such as: negotiating, dealing with demanding customers, presentation skills, resolving conflict, or showing empathy. These help the reader build up more of a picture than saying you’re a good team-worker and an effective communicator. However, be brief – you can highlight examples of your skills in later sections.

Include keywords relevant to the kind of work you seek or are applying for. (When someone uses a search engine, they type in one or more words describing what they are looking for; eg ‘Facilities Manager’ or ‘Corporate Real Estate”. These words or phrases are known as keywords.) Many recruitment companies make use of software to sift job applications based on a keyword search.

When you’re summarising your career aims, think about the employer you are sending your CV to. It will hit home with employers if your career aims sound exactly like the kind of opportunities they currently have or are likely to provide in future.

Try to relate your summary to the job description or, if you’re sending your CV on spec, what you think the employer is looking for.

I wish all those starting out on, or a continuing, a job search this week every success and if I can help, please get in touch.

Remember I offer a trial free half hour coaching session by phone or Skype.

Warm regards

Wendy
wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com
http://wisewolfcoaching.com

  • Job Search – Please Write Those Important STAR Stories
  • Career Development: When it is time for a change!
  • Career Development: When You Have to Reapply For Your Own Job

Volunteering helps the community and improves your career

Volunteering helps the community and improves your career

Today we have the second post in this series from Tamara M. Williams. Tamara publishes articles in topics such as Software and Marketing.  Learn more about Tamara at EzineArticles and Squidoo.

Volunteering is usually recommended while you are at college. However, it is essential to give back to the community even after you have graduated. You learn new skills, meet new people and add new experiences to your CV. This shows prospective employers that you are willing to work without pay in order to develop your career.

Volunteer work means that you perform various tasks offline or online without pay. Sometimes you already have the skills to perform the tasks but other times you learn from others. If you already are very skilled then you can train other persons or supervise a team. If not then you will be assigned to perform simpler tasks under supervision until you have gained enough skills. Volunteer activities in the United States can be completed at many popular organisations such as the American Cancer Society, The Salvation Army, American Red Cross, Boys & Girls Clubs, and YWCA. However, there are many more that can be found by asking at your community center or searching online at neighbourhood websites.

Volunteering at college is easier because you go to the Career center and ask for the recommended organisations that you can join. You can also ask your roommates, friends and lecturers for organisations that they have worked with in the past. During the academic year when you attend various events you will often hear about volunteer work. Always join and contribute a few hours regardless of how busy your academic schedule is. You get to meet new persons and contribute to worthy causes. This shows that you were also thinking about the community instead of just about your books and parties.

Some corporations have communities that they volunteer with.

Some corporations have communities that they volunteer with. The projects are usually aligned to the company’s objective. Usually you are allowed to perform your volunteer activities during work hours. This means that you get to work with co-workers from various departments and get to see a more relaxed side of their personalities. This improves your relationship with them because it is easier to bond. It also gets you exposed to the various needs of the community that you might not have been aware of.

If prefer not to take on volunteer opportunities at college or at work then you can ask persons in your community or neighbouring communities. Volunteering closer to home means you get to save time and money on transportation. You get to learn more about the people, places and events that are an important part of your neighbourhood.

Each time you volunteer record the persons, activities and places that were involved. Make a note of the skills you learnt, knowledge you gained and how these contribute to your career. Then add these to a document so that you can see your progress over time. Afterwards, update your CV and explain the benefits that you gained and what you gave in return. Remember that it does not need to be continuous so you should plan it around your schedule and be willing to be flexible.

As you can see, volunteering is a great way to meet new people or improve your relationship with those you already know. You also get to learn or strengthen your skills. Ask for more information at your college, employer or community center. Take the time to search for organisations that are close to work and home so that you spend more time volunteering and less time on the road. Then add your experiences to your CV to show that you care about the community too.

About the Author:

Learn more about Tamara M. Williams at EzineArticles and Squidoo.

Does Your CV Let You Down?

Does Your CV Let You Down?

Does Your CV Let You Down? Here are some mistakes it is only too easy to make when submitting your CV.

Your CV doesn’t make it clear that you are qualified for the job.

You don’t show a clear connection between your background, skills and achievements and what the employer needs. It’s likely that a computer scanning system, known as an applicant tracking system, will check your CV for the keywords and phrases necessary to match you to the employer’s requirements.

Even if it is very clear to you that you’re well suited for the job, it is up to you to make sure that you show how you have what they are looking. Make sure this is in very straight forward terms.

You shouldn’t rely on the cover letter or anything else you may send with your CV (or application form where that has to be completed) to describe the key reasons why you are well suited to the role. It is quite probable that your potential employer will not see any further information about you until you pass through the CV/resume/application form screen.

You make grammatical or spelling errors in your CV, application form or cover letter.

This is a frequent complaint when recruiters discuss applicants.

It is important for all roles that you check for typos but you would be surprised how often there are mistakes in applications for jobs that involve writing. For example, when applying for administrative roles, one typo or an error can make the difference between landing an interview or being cast aside. But errors throw doubt on credibility at a more senior level too.

It’s difficult to proofread something you write yourself – as I know all to well.

Think about asking an eagle-eyed friend to review your cover letter and resume before you send them in. I am a creative writer, as well as a business blogger, and my two very best friends are my content editor, who makes sure the story is worth reading, and my dear, dear copy editor. Find a good friend who can check your job application for both typos and common sense! Of course, always spell-check your work, but be very much aware that spell-check doesn’t pick up every error.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

Job Search – Does Your CV Let You Down?

Job Search – Does Your CV Let You Down?

Here are some mistakes it is only too easy to make when submitting your CV.

Your CV doesn’t make it clear that you are qualified for the job.

You don’t show a clear connection between your background, skills and achievements and what the employer needs. It’s likely that a computer scanning system, known as an applicant tracking system, will check your CV for the keywords and phrases necessary to match you to the employer’s requirements.

Even if it is very clear to you that you’re well suited for the job, it is up to you to make sure that you show how you have what they are looking. Make sure this is in very straight forward terms.

You shouldn’t rely on the cover letter or anything else you may send with your CV (or application form where that has to be completed) to describe the key reasons why you are well suited to the role. It is quite probable that your potential employer will not see any further information about you until you pass through the CV/resume/application form screen.

You make grammatical or spelling errors in your CV, application form or cover letter.

This is a frequent complaint when recruiters discuss applicants.

It is important for all roles that you check for typos but you would be surprised how often there are mistakes in applications for jobs that involve writing. For example, when applying for administrative roles, one typo or an error can make the difference between landing an interview or being cast aside. But errors throw doubt on credibility at a more senior level too.

It’s difficult to proofread something you write yourself – as I know all to well.

Think about asking an eagle-eyed friend to review your cover letter and resume before you send them in. I am a creative writer, as well as a business blogger, and my two very best friends are my content editor, who makes sure the story is worth reading, and my dear, dear copy editor. Find a good friend who can check your job application for both typos and common sense! Of course, always spell-check your work, but be very much aware that spell-check doesn’t pick up every error.

If you need the support of someone who is a career coach (as well as other things) in your job search or career development, please get in touch.

Warm regards
Wendy
wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com
http://wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy Mason’s Amazon Page

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Writing Your CV

Writing Your CV

Writing Your CV! You’d be surprised how many people have never had to write a CV! It can be a daunting task!

How do you begin to put your career history on paper?  And what is the right balance of skill, experience and achievements to record?

If you get it wrong your CV can look unbalanced. Or, even worse, become unreadable!

You want to show a successful career progression. It should make the next opportunity (the one you have just decided to apply for) look like a logical move! Making it look like a natural fit can put you ahead in the job’s market.  It marks you out as the candidate they want.

Your resume needs to be a well written, clear and concise!

So format is important! Please don’t go for complicated designs with tables and fancy fonts.  Use a simple, clean, format that is well organiser and easily scanned. That will attract both the recruiter’s eye. And, these days often more important, it is easy for the recruiter’s software to process.

Produce a baseline CV. Then be prepared to adapt it to each job that you apply for. That way you can target your qualifications, skills, and key strengths. You should include relevant “keywords;” again with the sifting software in mind. You want to appeal to the person advertising the job at first glance!

Grabbing the recruiter’s attention is all important. You probably have 30 seconds or less to make an impression! So put the most relevant information upfront in your headline. Again, include keywords relevant to the advert or spec.

Make sure you CV is simple to read. And concentrate in terms of experience on the last 10 years.  Summarise anything earlier.  Focus on your achievements and the benefits you have delivered.  Show the benefits you will bring!

One of the major advantages of working with a career coach should be that you get your baseline CV in good order. And you learn how to adapt it. If you would like help with your CV, get in touch.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link