Presents for You From Wendy and WiseWolf

Presents for You From Wendy and WiseWolf

To celebrate the holiday Season

10% discount on my career and life coaching services until 31st January 2014

Quote XMAS2013

Email: wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com for more details

And on 

24th December 2013 for one day only

Download my novels The Wolf Project and Blood Brothers from Amazon for free

Presents

Presents – I believe you will enjoy them and I would very much welcome your Amazon reviews!

Find out more about the books at these links.
Wendy’s UK Amazon Page

Presents for You From Wendy and WiseWolf

Presents for You From Wendy and WiseWolf

To celebrate my birthday on 19th December and the Christmas Season, on two special days I have special gifts for you.

On

19th December 2013

and

24th December 2013

Download my novels The Wolf Project and Blood Brothers from Amazon for free.

I believe you will enjoy them and I would very much welcome your Amazon reviews!
Find out more about the books at these links.
Wendy’s UK Amazon Page

Christmas Stress – Here is Help!

Christmas Stress – here is help!

Christmas stress! Stressful situations can happen at home as well as at work and Christmas is a particularly stressful time. If you’ve coped with a lot of stress at work then dealing with the extra stress of Christmas at home may make you feel overwhelmed.

What happens in stress is that your body goes into overdrive and you may find yourself with

  • Pounding heart
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Chest pains
  • Feeling faint
  • Sweating
  • Nausea
  • With shaking limbs and jelly legs

Now, of course, chest pains and breathlessness should be checked out with a medical adviser. But all these symptoms can be exaggerations of your body’s normal response to fear or stress (the “fight or flight” mechanism). They can feel very frightening in themselves and that makes things worse. But once you’ve checked with a doctor, you need to keep in mind that they are not dangerous or harmful provided you take action to help you handle the stress.

They are happening because your body is flooded with stress hormones such as adrenaline and corticosteroid. They were helpful when we had to run away from dangerous animal but now they produce those frightening symptoms.

So what can you do to feel better.

  1. First recognise the symptoms for what they are.  If it is possible to remove any of the pressures on you, then do so. Use the same techniques you would use at work to organise and prioritize any work you have to do at home.
  2. Start to control you thoughts – when anxious thoughts and worries come into your head take a pause and start to repeat to yourself quietly; “This will pass.” Each time a negative thought comes into your head say it again, until the new thought replaces the negative one. And you know at Christmastime that the 2nd of January does come round remarkably quickly.
  3. Have little stock of things you enjoy, such as, music on your iPod, or in my case very old BBC Radio comedies. Even if you can only find 10 minutes alone to enjoy to them, do so everyday.
  4. Be quite ruthless in protecting yourself from the harmful effect of negative friends and relatives. If you have to spend time with them then make sure you take regular breaks and reward your self for your patience in dealing with them.
  5. Avoid over eating and drinking too much but make sure you have a little of everything that you enjoy.
  6. If it is at all possible take short walk in the open air each day.
  7. Recognise that this is an emotionally demanding time and if you feel like having a good cry then do so – tears can be a very healthy response to the feelings within us.
  8. Practice relaxed breathing – the technique is described below

Christmas Stress! Relaxed breathing can help

Practise deep breathing at a regular time and in a quiet place where you won’t be disturbed.

Loosen or remove any tight clothes, such as shoes or jackets. Make yourself feel completely comfortable.

Sit in a comfy chair which supports your head or lie on the floor or bed. Place your arms on the chair arms, or flat on the floor or bed, a little bit away from the side of your body with the palms up. If you’re lying down, stretch out your legs, keeping them hip-width apart or slightly wider. If you’re sitting in a chair, don’t cross your legs.

Good relaxation always starts with focusing on your breathing. The way to do it is to breathe in and out slowly and in a regular rhythm as this will help you to calm down.

Fill up the whole of your lungs with air, without forcing. Imagine you’re filling up a bottle, so that your lungs fill from the bottom:

  • Breathe in through your nose and out through your mouth.
  • Breathe in slowly and regularly counting from one to five (don’t worry if you can’t reach five at first).
  • Then let the breath escape slowly, counting from one to five.

Keep doing this until you feel calm. Breathe without pausing or holding your breath.

Practise this relaxed breathing for three to five minutes, two to three times a day (or whenever you feel stressed).

I wish you the happiest holidays and if I you need help to handle the after shock, please get in touch.

Remember I offer a trial free half hour coaching session by phone or Skype.

Warm regards

Wendy
wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com
http://wisewolfcoaching.com

Christmas can be stressful – here is help!

Christmas can be stressful – here is help!

Advice from Wendy Smith. Wendy is a Career and Life Coach helping youfind fresh perspectives on life and your career.  You can book a FREE coaching session or find out more at this link

Christmas can be stressful  – stressful situations can happen at home as well as at work and Christmas is a particularly stressful time. If you’ve coped with a lot of stress at work then dealing with the extra stress of Christmas at home may make you feel overwhelmed.

Christmas can be stressful – symptoms

What happens in stress is that your body goes into overdrive and you may find yourself with

  • Pounding heart
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Chest pains
  • Feeling faint
  • Sweating
  • Nausea
  • With shaking limbs and jelly legs

Now, of course, chest pains and breathlessness should be checked out with a medical adviser. But all these symptoms can be exaggerations of your body’s normal response to fear or stress (the “fight or flight” mechanism). They can feel very frightening in themselves and that makes things worse. But once you’ve checked with a doctor, you need to keep in mind that they are not dangerous or harmful provided you take action to help you handle the stress.

They are happening because your body is flooded with stress hormones such as adrenaline and corticosteroid. They were helpful when we had to run away from dangerous animal but now they produce those frightening symptoms.

So what can you do to feel better.

  1. First recognise the symptoms for what they are.  If it is possible to remove any of the pressures on you, then do so. Use the same techniques you would use at work to organise and prioritize any work you have to do at home.
  2. Start to control you thoughts – when anxious thoughts and worries come into your head take a pause and start to repeat to yourself quietly; “This will pass.” Each time a negative thought comes into your head say it again, until the new thought replaces the negative one. And you know at Christmastime that the 2nd of January does come round remarkably quickly.
  3. Have little stock of things you enjoy, such as, music on your iPod, or in my case very old BBC Radio comedies. Even if you can only find 10 minutes alone to enjoy to them, do so everyday.
  4. Be quite ruthless in protecting yourself from the harmful effect of negative friends and relatives. If you have to spend time with them then make sure you take regular breaks and reward your self for your patience in dealing with them.
  5. Avoid over eating and drinking too much but make sure you have a little of everything that you enjoy.
  6. If it is at all possible take short walk in the open air each day.
  7. Recognise that this is an emotionally demanding time and if you feel like having a good cry then do so – tears can be a very healthy response to the feelings within us.
  8. Practice relaxed breathing – the technique is described below

Relaxed breathing

Practise deep breathing at a regular time and in a quiet place where you won’t be disturbed.

Loosen or remove any tight clothes, such as shoes or jackets. Make yourself feel completely comfortable.

Sit in a comfy chair which supports your head or lie on the floor or bed. Place your arms on the chair arms, or flat on the floor or bed, a little bit away from the side of your body with the palms up. If you’re lying down, stretch out your legs, keeping them hip-width apart or slightly wider. If you’re sitting in a chair, don’t cross your legs.

Good relaxation always starts with focusing on your breathing. The way to do it is to breathe in and out slowly and in a regular rhythm as this will help you to calm down.

Fill up the whole of your lungs with air, without forcing. Imagine you’re filling up a bottle, so that your lungs fill from the bottom:

  • Breathe in through your nose and out through your mouth.
  • Breathe in slowly and regularly counting from one to five (don’t worry if you can’t reach five at first).
  • Then let the breath escape slowly, counting from one to five.

Keep doing this until you feel calm. Breathe without pausing or holding your breath.

Practise this relaxed breathing for three to five minutes, two to three times a day (or whenever you feel stressed).

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in helping people lead happier lives and feel more fulfilled. She has worked in management as well as coaching and personal development, as well as starting up her own businesses. That means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up a new business or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book a FREE coaching session with Wendy or find out more at this link

Office Parties: Tips to help you manage the risks

Office Parties: Tips to help you manage the risks

Advice from Wendy Smith. Wendy is a Career and Life Coach helping you find fresh perspectives on life and your career.  You can book a FREE coaching session or find out more at this link

Office parties! The office party season often creates worries for both office partiesemployers and employees. But it can be an event where you behave professionally and still have fun. It provides a great opportunity to socialize with co-workers and with managers with whom you wouldn’t usually spend much time. If you follow the advice below you should be able to handle the office party season with confidence and grace.

Office Parties – Tips

  1.  Prepare yourself mentally and accept that this is part of what is expected. It can be a good opportunity to meet new colleagues and your senior managers in a less formal environment. It provides a chance to network with new people. But it is probably a good idea to decide not to stay until the end before you go. Have a ready-made reason for leaving before people begin to really let their hair down and you are tempted to join in.  Make sure you stick to your resolution.
  2. Take care what you wear. Find out what everyone else is going to wear before the party and match the tone with your outfit.  If you are a woman, find a compromise; you want to look attractive without being overtly sexy. Keep in mind the image you have worked so hard to build and don’t destroy it in a few short hours. For men,showing your more extreme eccentricities in dress is rarely a good idea.
  3. Arrive on time for office parties. Turning up ‘fashionably late’ is not really an option at a work event and it may get noticed. Plus arriving on time gives you the opportunity to say hello to everyone and socialize while people are still likely to remember the good impression you make. It means as well, you can get out early without seeming rude.
  4. Mingle. Be sure to acknowledge all your co-workers, your managers and other business contacts who are there. Don’t give anyone the opportunity to think you ignored them; the Christmas party is an excellent opportunity to cement relationships.
  5. Don’t “dis” the boss. Talk to your co-workers and others about work issues in a positive and complimentary light, focusing on achievements for the year and fun things you remember. Whatever negative thoughts you have, keep them out of this environment. It is easy to overhear things said in a crowd but to misunderstand, so don’t get drawn into listening to other’s negativity either, you may be assumed by others to agree. Instead don’t be frightened to talk to your co-workers and management about things outside of work such as the cinema, football, holidays, hobbies and family. And practice listening; this is as important as the small talk. Though it may feel really informal, remember it is still a work event! This isn’t the time to be speaking your mind informally to management.
  6. Drink responsibly at office parties. Keep in mind that everything observed has the potential to be turned into a judgement on your professionalism and work suitability. No matter how much management has insisted that everyone let down their hair, just don’t. Eat first before drinking. Drinking on an empty stomach is asking for trouble. Space all drinks with water and more food, and lots of conversation.
  7. Be careful about romantic/sexy behaviour. Bear in mind the potential for claims of sexual harassment for both men and women. Do not touch people in ways that can be misinterpreted, or say things that are considered demeaning or sexually provocative. Use your common sense. On the other hand, if you find yourself being hit on, even by your boss, and provided it is not grossly offensive, let them down gently. I do not mean you allow yourself to be secually assaulted.Try to preserve everyone’s dignity and remember co-workers will gossip as soon as they see anything happen. Don’t do anything you wouldn’t like to hear recounted in the office the next day.
  8. Help others. If you see a co-worker overdoing the drinking or making a move when they are clearly not fully mentally in charge of themselves, step in and bail them out. Explain to them tactfully what they are doing and how it appears to other people. If this doesn’t sink in, discreetly ring a cab and make sure they get home safely. This is a time when your executive decision-making can save their reputation.

If you follow the advice above you should be able to handle your coming office parties with confidence and grace.

I wish all those planning an office party every success and if I you need help to handle the after shock, please get in touch.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in helping people lead happier lives and feel more fulfilled. She has worked in management as well as coaching and personal development, as well as starting up her own businesses. That means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up a new business or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book a FREE coaching session with Wendy or find out more at this link