Time to Make The Change

Time to Make The Change

Changing Careers – Part 3 Deciding Whether To Make The Change – A Checklist

Make The Change – this is the third and last part of our series for career changers. In Part 1 (Link below) we thought about whether career change could benefit you and suggested some questions that might help you to be clearer about your decision. In Part 2 (Link below) we considered how you can start building up a picture of your ideal job and find out which careers match it most closely.

Deciding to change career could be brilliant for you, but it is a big step. So you need to make sure you’ve thought of everything and you know what to expect. When you change career, you need to consider location, salary and the job market, for example. And you may also need to put some work into updating your skills and qualifications.

Here is a checklist of things to consider!

  1. Location You’ll need to consider location and how far you are willing to move. While you can probably find work as a florist in most large towns, if you’re looking to get into advertising, for example, there are likely to be more opportunities in London and other major cities.
  2. Salary and Promotion Most careers provide opportunities for promotion and you should check out what these might be. But it may not mean much more pay. You may have to decide between doing something you love or going for something less appealing with more pay.
  3. Time Changing career can eat away at your free time – you might need to work long hours, do voluntary work or study a course. Think about how this will affect others and whether you can really ask them to make the sacrifice. What about your partner, your children or anyone else you live with? Make sure you talk it over with them and let them know what will be involved. But don’t leave out the benefits – give them a balanced picture.
  4. The job market There’s competition in most careers, but some are more competitive than others. Careers that are seen as glamorous can be difficult to get into without plenty of unpaid work experience, enthusiasm and some luck. Make sure you understand what it is going to take.
  5. Working conditions What will doing the job actually mean for your day-to-day? If it involves meeting lots of people and that’s not your thing, you might want to think again. Would you prefer a job indoors, or wouldn’t you mind being outside in the depths of winter?
  6. Plan your finances This is the big one. Switching careers usually involves a drop in salary, as you try to establish yourself in a new field. Are you and your family prepared to lower your outgoings, do without holidays, share a car or use some savings for a few years, if that is required?

Changing Careers – Part 1 Where To Start! A Checklist for Career Change

Changing Careers – Part 2 Finding the right career to suit you

Help with career planning

If you need support form a coach in making a decision about a career change, please get in touch. I wish you every success in making your decision and, if it is right for you, making your career change.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

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Changing Careers – Part 3 Deciding Whether To Make The Change – A Checklist

Changing Careers – Part 3 Deciding Whether To Make The Change – A Checklist

This is the third and last part of our series for career changers. In Part 1 we thought about whether career change could benefit you and suggested some questions that might help you to be clearer about your decision. In Part 2 we considered how you can start building up a picture of your ideal job and find out which careers match it most closely.

Deciding to change career could be brilliant for you, but it is a big step. So you need to make sure you’ve thought of everything and you know what to expect. When you change career, you need to consider location, salary and the job market, for example. And you may also need to put some work into updating your skills and qualifications.

Here is a checklist of things to consider!

  1. Location You’ll need to consider location and how far you are willing to move. While you can probably find work as a florist in most large towns, if you’re looking to get into advertising, for example, there are likely to be more opportunities in London and other major cities.
  2. Salary and Promotion Most careers provide opportunities for promotion and you should check out what these might be. But it may not mean much more pay. You may have to decide between doing something you love or going for something less appealing with more pay.
  3. Time Changing career can eat away at your free time – you might need to work long hours, do voluntary work or study a course. Think about how this will affect others and whether you can really ask them to make the sacrifice. What about your partner, your children or anyone else you live with? Make sure you talk it over with them and let them know what will be involved. But don’t leave out the benefits – give them a balanced picture.
  4. The job market There’s competition in most careers, but some are more competitive than others. Careers that are seen as glamorous can be difficult to get into without plenty of unpaid work experience, enthusiasm and some luck. Make sure you understand what it is going to take.
  5. Working conditions What will doing the job actually mean for your day-to-day? If it involves meeting lots of people and that’s not your thing, you might want to think again. Would you prefer a job indoors, or wouldn’t you mind being outside in the depths of winter?
  6. Plan your finances This is the big one. Switching careers usually involves a drop in salary, as you try to establish yourself in a new field. Are you and your family prepared to lower your outgoings, do without holidays, share a car or use some savings for a few years, if that is required?

Help with career planning

If you need support form a coach in making a decision about a career change, please get in touch. I wish you every success in making your decision and, if it is right for you, making your career change.

Wendy Mason is a career coach and writer.  She helps people reach their goals and aspirations, without sacrificing their home and personal life.  You can contact Wendy at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com and find out more at http://wisewolfcoaching.com

Other posts you might like to read

  • Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 1 Admit A Change is Needed

  • Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 2 Be Clear About The Change You Want

  • Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 3 Be Clear About What Is Troubling You

  • Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 4 Identify what is most difficult for you

  • Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 5 Select Your Goals for Change
  • Be Successful -Making A Personal Change – Part 6 Change Your Core Beliefs
  • Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 7 Learning To Accept Yourself
  • Changing Careers – Part 2 Finding the right career to suit you
  • Changing Careers – Part 1 Where To Start! A Checklist For Decision Making.

A Checklist For Your Personal brand

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September and a new term begins.  Time to reassess and refresh your personal brand!  The world sees your personal brand in all you do; it can work for you or against you.    

Sometime ago I posted a Checklist for your Personal Brand on Wisewolf Talking. Here is an updated version.

1. Do you have credibility? Are you an expert in your subject?  Do people believe you know what you are talking about?  Do the words you use reflect the latest thinking on your subject?  Do you write articles and blog posts on your specialist interest? Does your resume reflect the real depth of your experience – is it up to date?

2. Do you have an introductory piece – an ‘elevator speech?  Can you deliver a succinct description of what you do, how you do it differently, plus the benefit it delivers, within the time that it takes an elevator to travel one floor?

3. Are you a convincing communicator? Do people believe what you say and act on your advice?  Why not do a market survey – choose three people you trust and ask them what they think!  If not, then read a book or take a class.

4. Do you dress for the job?  Do you know what the dress code is for your sector?  Do you follow it?  But what about off duty – if you met you boss in the supermarket, what impression would they get?  Think about what is appropriate to the situation – balance your individual style with clothing that will appeal to those you are trying to impress.

5. Do you know the etiquette for your organization and your sector?  How do people behave? What kind of business cards do people carry?  Be the one who follows up and says thank you after sector and professional events.

6. Do you know the people you need to impress?  Take time out to build your address book.  Collect business cards – make sure your card reflects your image properly!  Ask contacts for further introductions.  Use LinkedInTwitterand Facebook to find new people.

7. Do you nurture your network?  Do you work at nurturing your relationship with your contacts?  Do you show an active interest in them and genuinely care about them?  Ask how they are and what they are doing and mean it.  Remember things they tell you – note them down if you need to! People appreciate real attention but they know when you are being insincere.

8. What do you do with your spare time?  If you give something back to the community with voluntary work or help your local sports club – the news does get around!

Your personal brand is precious – it’s the “you” that the world sees and judges you by.  Nurture your brand and you will nurture your life and your career.

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