Time for a career change

Time for a career change

Career Development:Radical thought – is it time for a career change?

Advice from Wendy Smith. Wendy is a Career and Life Coach helping you find fresh perspectives on life and your career.  You can book a FREE coaching session or find out more at this link

Time for a career change – changing careers isn’t easy. But nor is it as hard as you might imagine. I’ve done it four times. I’ve enjoyed the different careers at different periods in my life and I’ve been pretty lucky and found some success in each one. For me, there always comes a time to move on.

Changing in this way has allowed me to come to terms with a changing economic environment and with changes I wanted to make in my life. Each new direction has built upon the experience and knowledge gained in the last one.

So if you are thinking  it may be time for a change, how do you know for sure?  Well, answering the following questions might help you to be clearer about your decision.

Are you actually enjoying your present job?

If you’ve recently stopped enjoying the day-to-day activities in your job, consider the reason why?  Are you just bored and could you find a new challenge in your present organization? You might think about moving to a different department. Or perhaps a change of employer might be the answer, while staying in your current field. Could it be as simple as finding new and improved ways to meet your present objectives?

If you actively dislike parts of your work, ask yourself whether what you do is typical for someone in your type of role. Do you dislike the job because you don’t get the chance to use all of your talents? If you’re dissatisfied with the job itself, changing department or employer may not improve things. You may want to consider a more radical change.

Do you feel motivated by the people you work with?

How do you get on with colleagues, managers, clients and others in your workplace? Are any problems due to personality clashes with particular people? You’d be surprised how many of my clients find it difficult to get on with their current boss.  If this is a problem for you get in touch – there are things you can do to help.

Is it the culture of your workplace?

Do you feel comfortable with how things are done in your current organization?  If so, you may want to look at changing your role within the organisation or looking for a different role with a similar employer. If not, then be careful to check out the culture of any new organization before you commit to a move.

Are you satisfied with your work-life balance?

If you’re looking for a better fit with your family life, a change of job isn’t always necessary. Technology is making it possible for more people to spend time working from home. You may have the right to ask your employer to make arrangements for flexible working. Your employer can refuse if there’s a good business reason to do so. But employers are becoming much more willing to consider flexible working?

Is the time right for you to take the risk?

If you have, for example, family responsibilities and others economically dependent on you, then changing now may mean putting others at risk. Also, are you prepared to risk what you have invested in your present role and a possible loss of status? This may be only temporary of course but it may be more significant if you are moving into a new field.  In changing careers, timing is all. When you are dealing with lots of other changes in your life, this change may not be right for you at this time.

You need to be very honest with yourself and with other people who may be affected by the change you want to make before you make any binding decisions. And you need to be very realistic about what remains a challenging economic climate.  Look for a new role while you are still employed; don’t resign in hope – that is very risky indeed.

If you do decide to make a change – don’t let lack of confidence in yourself get in the way.  If I did it, you can too! And if you need support from a coach in making a decision about a career change, please get in touch.

If you would like further advice on this please get in touch at the link below.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in helping people lead happier lives and feel more fulfilled. She has worked in management as well as coaching and personal development, as well as starting up her own businesses. That means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up a new business or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book a FREE coaching session with Wendy or find out more at this link

 

Career Development:Twist and Shout

Career Development: Twist and Shout

Career Development: Twist and Shout – today we have another great guest post from Daryl Tomlinson who brings us advice based his long term experience of working with a job board.

Career Development:Twist and ShoutEmbarking on a new career can be a gamble, just as life can be a risk every time we close the front door behind us, we step into a world full of hidden danger, full of hazard, yet also full of untapped potential. You have decided to stride a different path, yet consciously and sub-consciously doubts and realism may hold you back. You weigh up the pros and cons and sometimes the cons will win and you step back into the shadow of security.

Like in blackjack, you have the option to twist or stick. Twist and you could have the dream career, but possibly fail. Stick and you have that security yet forever look through the window of opportunity and wonder what if.

Career Development:Twist and Shout

What will you do?

The key is taking the gamble out of the equation, not think about it as a risk, believe in your abilities, and trust your instincts. Of course I am not saying if you work as an accountant, for instance, and dream of being a brain surgeon that you immediately quit your job and apply for the very first brain surgeon job you see.

You know deep down your skills, you know your abilities and you know your potential. What you don’t know, you learn, what skills you don’t have, you learn, what abilities you don’t have you learn and then you can take that potential and look to a future where YOU are in control of YOUR career.

When you believe in the abilities you have, when you learn the skills, then going for that dream career is less a gamble but more an opportunity to be relished. Failure doesn’t equate risk when you have the tools behind you to succeed because no longer do you rely on chance, you rely on you.

So when the thought of Monday morning chills you to the bone, why not take that step towards that dream job?

It’s simple, will you stick and stay silent or twist and shout?

Daryl Tomlinson

You can find Daryl’s earlier post CV Writing; How to make a recruiter take a second look! at this link! 

Is it time for you to make career change?

Is it time for you to make career change?

Career Development: Radical thought – is it time for you to make career change?

Is it time for you to make career change? Changing careers isn’t easy. But nor is it as hard as you might imagine. I’ve done it four times. I’ve enjoyed the different careers at different periods in my life and I’ve been pretty lucky and found some success in each one. For me, there always comes a time to move on.

Changing in this way has allowed me to come to terms with a changing economic environment and with changes I wanted to make in my life. Each new direction has built upon the experience and knowledge gained in the last one.

So if you are thinking  it may be time for a change, how do you know for sure?  Well, answering the following questions might help you to be clearer about your decision.

Are you actually enjoying your present job?

If you’ve recently stopped enjoying the day-to-day activities in your job, consider the reason why?  Are you just bored and could you find a new challenge in your present organization? You might think about moving to a different department. Or perhaps a change of employer might be the answer, while staying in your current field. Could it be as simple as finding new and improved ways to meet your present objectives?

If you actively dislike parts of your work, ask yourself whether what you do is typical for someone in your type of role. Do you dislike the job because you don’t get the chance to use all of your talents? If you’re dissatisfied with the job itself, changing department or employer may not improve things. You may want to consider a more radical change.

Do you feel motivated by the people you work with?

How do you get on with colleagues, managers, clients and others in your workplace? Are any problems due to personality clashes with particular people? You’d be surprised how many of my clients find it difficult to get on with their current boss.  If this is a problem for you get in touch – there are things you can do to help.

Is it the culture of your workplace?

Do you feel comfortable with how things are done in your current organization?  If so, you may want to look at changing your role within the organisation or looking for a different role with a similar employer. If not, then be careful to check out the culture of any new organization before you commit to a move.

Are you satisfied with your work-life balance?

If you’re looking for a better fit with your family life, a change of job isn’t always necessary. Technology is making it possible for more people to spend time working from home. You may have the right to ask your employer to make arrangements for flexible working. Your employer can refuse if there’s a good business reason to do so. But employers are becoming much more willing to consider flexible working?

Is the time right for you to take the risk?

If you have, for example, family responsibilities and others economically dependent on you, then changing now may mean putting others at risk. Also, are you prepared to risk what you have invested in your present role and a possible loss of status? This may be only temporary of course but it may be more significant if you are moving into a new field.  In changing careers, timing is all. When you are dealing with lots of other changes in your life, this change may not be right for you at this time.

You need to be very honest with yourself and with other people who may be affected by the change you want to make before you make any binding decisions. And you need to be very realistic about what remains a challenging economic climate.  Look for a new role while you are still employed; don’t resign in hope – that is very risky indeed.

If you do decide to make a change – don’t let lack of confidence in yourself get in the way.  If I did it, you can too! And if you need support from a coach in making a decision about a career change, please get in touch.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link