Career Development:Twist and Shout

Twist and you could have the dream career, but possibly fail. Stick and you have that security yet forever look through the window of opportunity and wonder

Career Development: Twist and Shout

Career Development: Twist and Shout – today we have another great guest post from Daryl Tomlinson who brings us advice based his long term experience of working with a job board.

Career Development:Twist and ShoutEmbarking on a new career can be a gamble, just as life can be a risk every time we close the front door behind us, we step into a world full of hidden danger, full of hazard, yet also full of untapped potential. You have decided to stride a different path, yet consciously and sub-consciously doubts and realism may hold you back. You weigh up the pros and cons and sometimes the cons will win and you step back into the shadow of security.

Like in blackjack, you have the option to twist or stick. Twist and you could have the dream career, but possibly fail. Stick and you have that security yet forever look through the window of opportunity and wonder what if.

Career Development:Twist and Shout

What will you do?

The key is taking the gamble out of the equation, not think about it as a risk, believe in your abilities, and trust your instincts. Of course I am not saying if you work as an accountant, for instance, and dream of being a brain surgeon that you immediately quit your job and apply for the very first brain surgeon job you see.

You know deep down your skills, you know your abilities and you know your potential. What you don’t know, you learn, what skills you don’t have, you learn, what abilities you don’t have you learn and then you can take that potential and look to a future where YOU are in control of YOUR career.

When you believe in the abilities you have, when you learn the skills, then going for that dream career is less a gamble but more an opportunity to be relished. Failure doesn’t equate risk when you have the tools behind you to succeed because no longer do you rely on chance, you rely on you.

So when the thought of Monday morning chills you to the bone, why not take that step towards that dream job?

It’s simple, will you stick and stay silent or twist and shout?

Daryl Tomlinson

You can find Daryl’s earlier post CV Writing; How to make a recruiter take a second look! at this link! 

Being Good At Your Job

Success in any career, job, or even task requires more than mere intelligence.

Being Good At Your Job

“Being good at your job requires much more than just being smart. Success in any career, job, or even task requires more than mere intelligence. Certainly book smarts can help but career advancement requires many things such as perseverance, good communication skills, flexibility, adaptability, and most of all, experience. From my perspective nothing can replace experience and good judgment. Maybe it’s because I’m a risk manager. The best risk managers don’t just rely on quantitative models but draw upon their experience and differentiate themselves through their judgment.” Andrea Pozzi, Managing Director, Citigroup

From Andrea Pozzi: Five Messages to My Younger Self About Career Advancement

If you would like some help in developing your career skills please get in touch. Successful leaders are modest enough to know that working with a coach really can make a difference.

Wendy Mason is the The Career Coach – helping you to find fresh perspectives on your Job Search and Career. She helps you work towards your goals and aspirations, in a way that fits in with both work and home life. Email her at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com,  find her on Skype at wendymason14, or call +44 (0) 2081239146 (02081239146 for UK callers) or +1 262 317 9016 if you are in the US.

A free trial/consultation allows you to try phone coaching from the comfort of your own home and without risk. Don’t forget to ask about the Summer Special Offer 

 

 

WiseWolf's Monday Snippet- Being good at your job…

Success in any career, job, or even task requires more than mere intelligence.

Being good at your job requires much more than just being smart.

“Being good at your job requires much more than just being smart. Success in any career, job, or even task requires more than mere intelligence. Certainly book smarts can help but career advancement requires many things such as perseverance, good communication skills, flexibility, adaptability, and most of all, experience. From my perspective nothing can replace experience and good judgment. Maybe it’s because I’m a risk manager. The best risk managers don’t just rely on quantitative models but draw upon their experience and differentiate themselves through their judgment.” Andrea Pozzi, Managing Director, Citigroup

From Andrea Pozzi: Five Messages to My Younger Self About Career Advancement

If you would like some help in developing your career skills please get in touch. Successful leaders are modest enough to know that working with a coach really can make a difference.

Wendy Mason is the The Career Coach – helping you to find fresh perspectives on your Job Search and Career. She helps you work towards your goals and aspirations, in a way that fits in with both work and home life. Email her at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com,  find her on Skype at wendymason14, or call +44 (0) 2081239146 (02081239146 for UK callers) or +1 262 317 9016 if you are in the US.

A free trial/consultation allows you to try phone coaching from the comfort of your own home and without risk. Don’t forget to ask about the Summer Special Offer 

 

 

Starting a New Job – What You Can Do Before Your First Day?

Starting a New Job – What You Can Do Before Your First Day?

By Dawn Rosenberg McKay, a career planning professional with two decades of experience.

Shortly before my daughter started kindergarten a few years ago we visited the school she was going to attend. She and the other children who were to be starting school with her visited the kindergarten classrooms, met each teacher, and participated in activities. This was my daughter’s first “first,” or at least her first significant one. Many more will follow, like someday in the distant future, her first day on a new job.

It’s really not much different actually, except there probably won’t be a formal orientation like the one my daughter had. And when you start a new job you’re generally not in the company of others who are also new. Oh no. You’re the new kid on the block coming into a situation where relationships have already been formed. You’re the only one who can’t find the restroom, doesn’t know where the supply room and mail room are located, doesn’t yet realize that the custodian wields all the real power, and doesn’t know not to talk to the boss until she’s had her first cup of coffee. There’s so much to learn in addition to the duties related to the job you were hired for. It’s quite overwhelming for most of us.

You can read the rest of this post with some great advice at this link

Career Development – Dealing With a New Boss

Most new bosses will have made enquiries about key people in their new team. But this is still to some extent a chance to make a fresh start. As you get to know your new boss, take the opportunity to make a new and positive impression. Show how good you are and, when the new boss is settled in, make sure they know how interested you are in your own career.

New BOSS logo Family and MWR Command 101104
Photo credit: familymwr

Career Development – Dealing With a New Boss

So there you are, happy in your job and doing quite well. You get on well with your boss and he/she thinks well of you and advocates for you with top management.  You couldn’t ask for much more really.

Then one day you get the news.  Your boss is moving on to set up a new division on the other side of the world in two week’s time.

You feel devastated and you start worry.  What will the new boss be like and who will it be?  The rumors start and they are never very positive are they? “That tough manager from finance is coming” or “They are going to take the opportunity to make cuts.” 

Stay Neutral But Prepare

You know the rumors are just that – this is nature filling a vacuum.

Stay calm but keep your wits about you till you have some real news.  If you can help your present boss to tie up the loose ends before departure do so – it will make life easier later.  See what you can find out about a possible successor and when you have a name, do your research.

Find out as much as possible about them but stay in a neutral space. Don’t add to the rumor mill and don’t assume that reputations are always justified – give your new boss a chance. But accept that this will be a time of change – let the past go with gratitude, rather than regrets. 

Give the new boss some space 

When the new boss arrives, give them time and space to settle in.  Don’t rush to be the first to make a good impression – there will be lots of people doing that.  But be courteous and welcoming – be optimistic.  Do your job as well as you can. 

Help when it is needed

 Show you are willing to help and support when it is needed.  Make it clear you are happy to share your knowledge of the organization and to make introductions. But accept that your new boss will have their own way of doing things and too much “this is how we do things here” from you, will really irritate.

Be authentic – don’t pretend to know more than you do or be more than you are!

 Be yourself with the new boss and don’t pretend to know more than you do.  If the boss asks a question you can’t answer, then offer to go and find out – don’t bluff, if they are any good they will see straight through it. Above all, don’t pretend to be someone in the organization that you are not – pretending to be on first name terms with the CEO can rebound on you. 

Take the opportunity to rebuild your professional image 

Most new bosses will have made enquiries about key people in their new team.  But this is still to some extent a chance to make a fresh start.  As you get to know your new boss, take the opportunity to make a new and positive impression.  Show how good you are and, when the new boss is settled in, make sure they know how interested you are in your own career.

What about new bosses who want to bring in new teams?

It is a fact of life that some new bosses prefer to bring in new teams. In your research before the new boss arrives, you may be able to find out if this is what they have done in the past.  If so, be prepared!

Do all the things, I’ve suggested above and give your new boss an opportunity to see how valuable and how flexible you are.  Show them that you can adapt to the new situation. But at the same time brush up your CV and keep an eye open for other possibilities.  Make sure you line-up your old boss up to give you a glowing reference.

If your new boss does want to make a complete change but sees how valuable you are, you might at the very least get their support in finding something new. You might be surprised by a request that you stay!

Accept life as it is now and make the best of it!

Accept that change is happening.  Things cannot stay the same, so accept the change with grace.  You will be sorry to see your boss go.  But the future is full of new possibilities.  Do your best to make the most of the opportunity.

If you have tips for dealing with new bosses, please share them here.

If you need the support of a coach in dealing with your change, please get in touch.  My email address is below.

Wendy Mason is a Life and Career Coach.  She helps people have theconfidence they need to be successful at work and to change career while maintaining a good work/life balance. You can email her at wendymason @wisewolfcoaching.com