Get on with the interview panel

Get on with the interview panel

How to get on with the interview panel – most job searches mean you have to deal with panel interviews.  Many large employers use panel interviewing as a part of their recruitment process.  It means a number of different people can be involved in the decision-making process.  They can be from different parts of the organization with an interest in the role. This gives a range of perspectives. Job interviews conducted by a panel are seen to be fair. There are seen as valid because a number of different opinions and views are taken into account..

Usually, each panel member will take turns to ask questions about your fitness for the role; your background, experience and interests.  It can be difficult to build rapport with each panel member . And sometimes, unfortunately, there might be one panel member that you find it particularly difficult to get on with.  This can happen at an interview, just as it can in other parts of your life.

Get on with the interview panel – tips

    • Knowing who the panel members are beforehand is a great help.  If you can, research people on the internet using LinkedIn, for example!  If this is not possible, use your knowledge of the company and the position to prepare to respond to questions from different parts of the organization. These could be human resources, line management, technical and finance.
    • Your introduction is important to creating the right first impression. This is a good opportunity to connect with each panel member on a personal level before the interview questions begin. Make initial eye contact with each panel member. Try to respond warmly and with interest.

When the questions start, listen carefully to what is being asked

  • When the questions start, listen carefully to what is being asked and don’t be afraid to ask for clarification. Make sure you understand correctly.  It is important to answer the question that has been asked.
  • Make initial eye contact with the person who asked the question. And then include the other panel members in your answer. Scan from one face to the next, pausing briefly on each. Focus on speaking to each individual As you finish your answer, return your focus to the person who asked the interview question. Stay calm and answer each question thoroughly.

Keep it pleasant

  • If you do get into a discussion, or you are asked to consider an alternative point of view, again stay calm. Do not expect to be successful if you let anger or annoyance show. Take time to respond with a considered view. Watch your body language. You can show frustration without saying a word.
  • If there is someone on the panel that you really cannot get on with, then don’t ignore how they make you feel and why.  Is that person to be your immediate boss in the new organization, or someone further up the line to whom you will report? Think seriously about whether the role is right for you.  Do this even if you are successful and it is a generous offer. I have worked with a number of clients who sensed at interview that all was not well. They ignored those feelings, only to have regrets later.

With the right preparation and approach, I hope you will get on well with all the members of any interview panel that you meet. If you need advice, get in touch.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

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Unhappy at work

Unhappy at work

Unhappy at work – the sad fact is that very few of us are lucky enough to be unhappy at workhappy all the time at work. For some though, sadly, they are not happy for most of the time. When that happens to you, you may need to spend a little time thinking through exactly why you are unhappy. And then you  can decide best what to do about it.

Most of us have days when we get up not excited about the prospect of going to work. It might be because we know we have something ahead that is very challenging. I mean the kind of challenging that checks the box that says “this challenge is really exciting and it is motivating me to do well”. But, even when you feel confident and competent in the job, some challenges will feel daunting.

There will be some challenges where you feel you really do not have the competencies needed to do well. In those circumstances, it is wise to seek help from your line manager, a mentor or a friendly colleague. It is better to have the strength and humility to seek help than to race on towards possible failure and more unhappiness.

If your unhappy at work is a question of confidence, then again training and support are available. There are lots of coaches like me who would be very happy to work with you. Most of us will work with you as a one off to help you to prepare for a special event and we’ll certainly work with you to resolve deeper issues. Plus, you can find lots of books to help you work on strengthening your confidence.

Of course there are all kinds of unhappiness at work. Here are just to few things that can make you unhappy at work;

1. The Job Itself

a. May be over and sometimes under-demanding
b. May have turned out to require a different skill set to that advertised or it has changed over time.

2. The people

a. The person we work for may be unpleasant to the point being a bully or perhaps pleasant but just not very good at managing
b. The team we work with may be poorly led, unpleasant or simply dysfunctional in some other way for example without clear terms of reference

3. The Environment

a. The location, accommodation or commute may be unpleasant.
b. The company may be failing or in difficulties for some reason
c. The culture of the organization may be one in which we can’t feel happy, fulfilled and appreciated

What really matters when you are unhappy is to try to be very clear about the reason. Until you are clear, it is quite difficult to define your options for putting things right. Too often the first response is simply to think I just need to get out. And in the present climate, that isn’t realistic!

Never be afraid to ask for help. There are lots of us out there who be pleased to talk to you!

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

Networking Tips to Help Your Job Search

Networking Tips to Help Your Job Search

Networking – if you are a new job seeker it might surprise you to learn that 60% networkingof jobs are never advertised.  That means that most vacancies are filled by word of mouth. There are filled through networking.

Why are so few vacancies advertised?

Advertising costs a lot of money.  And then it takes a lot of time to sort through application forms and CVs and even more resource to interview candidates. All this can be avoided by promoting from within the organisation or by employing people who are known to them. Some organisations actively encourage their staff to refer friends with suitable skills and most are happy to receive introductions to, or approaches from, good people.

How do I begin?

Most people are anxious about networking if they’ve never done it before. Taking an organised approach and working to your plan can help you feel more confident.

Steps to networking!

  1. Make a list of the people you know – including the sector they work in and who they might know.
  2. Look out for contacts and networks that relate to your own sector – check out industry conferences, events and forums.
  3. Exploit the possibilities of social networking. Join business networking sites such as LinkedIn. Look for relevant groups and organisations on social networking sites including Facebook. You could consider establishing your own networking group on LinkedIn or Facebook.
  4. Plan your approach. Have a clear idea of who you want to talk to or make contact with at events and online. Think about why you are interested in the organisation and why you’re approaching them.
  5. Do your homework. When approaching an individual or organisation try to research what they do. LinkedIn and Facebook are great tools for researching people. Get to understand their culture and the language of the sector they work in.
  6. Focus on what you can offer. Before setting up a networking meeting, think about what you can do for them. Could you suggest a contact that might help their business or offer to help out with a busy project they are involved in? Do you have specialist advice to offer?
  7. Tailor your communication. Don’t send out the same version of your speculative application letter or CV to all organisations. Make sure they are tailored to the organisation and show how your skills are relevant.
  8. Keep records.  Keep an excel spreadsheet or a notebook listing contacts,to whom you’ve spoken or written.  And include their contact details and their position as well as how you are going to follow up. This record can be invaluable if your contacts get in touch at a later date.
  9. Be yourself. The most important parts of networking are to be yourself and to treat other people with courtesy and respect. You don’t have to have overwhelming confidence – just remember other people at networking events may be feeling just like you. Show a real interest in other people and start a conversation, and then follow up; you will become a good net-worker and it will pay dividends.
  10. Remember, networking is 60% about giving (your time, interest and energy) and only 40% about getting

If you need support in developing the confidence to network please get in touch.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

Taking A Career Break: Quotes and Resources

Taking a Career Break

Taking A Career Break: Quotes and Resources

Taking a career break! Lots of us think and may be dream about the idea of taking some time out from the daily grind. Here are some quotes on the experience. Plus I’ve included below details of two books to  help you on your way. And now the quotes…

  1.  It is energizing and liberating to turn down a road you have not traveled before. To reach toward what you cannot yet touch brings new passion and strength to your life. Ralph Marston
  2. Disconnect with your work self on a sabbatical, and you’ll reconnect with who you really are.  Corbett Barr
  3. It’s a time to immerse yourself in a different environment, try new things, reassess your priorities, and look at your life from a different perspectiveMarelisa Fabrega
  4. Give yourself the priceless gifts of new experiences, new skills, new knowledge and the confidence of knowing how quickly you can grow. Expand your horizons, again and again, and discover that every limit is there to be transcended.  Ralph Marston
  5. Getting away from it all might be the only way you can really reset or change course. If you continue around the day-to-day, making significant changes is tough. Taking a few months off will give you the space you need to figure things out. Corbett Barr
  6. Taking a sabbatical is the first step towards discovering whether or not I can take the leap of faith and do something fully on my own.  Do anything for a while, and it becomes increasingly harder to cut the cord. Sam Dogen
  7. Of Fortune’s best 100 companies to work for in America, 21 of them have paid-for, formal sabbatical programs. It’s a competitive advantage with regard to recruiting talent. Jaye Smith
  8. Almost everybody got back to some form of better eating and exercise, and they keep that up. And they say, “I didn’t realize what stress I was under. Now I can go back for my next five years with some balance” Rita Foley
  9. My sabbatical didn’t really recharge my batteries as I hoped it would.  Instead, the sabbatical helped realize my preference for freedom over a steady paycheck at this point in my life.  I’ve experienced what life could be like if I worked for myself and I must say that I’m extremely excited about the prospects. Sam Dogen
  10. Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed in the things that you didn’t do than in the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Mark Twain

Books on Taking A Career Break

Escape 101: The Four Secrets to Taking a Sabbatical or Career Break Without Losing Your Money or Your Mind by Dan Clements and Tara Gignac  

“What’s your dream escape? Relaxing on a palm-studded beach? A year off to write your novel? Missionary work with the needy? Exploring ancient ruins or saving the rainforest?

Whether you’re an adventurer, a poet, a volunteer or you just need a break, Escape 101 provides you with a step-by-step system to take as much time as you need from your job, career or business, without losing ground.”

A Gap Year for Grown Ups by Susan Griffith

“A guide for grown ups wanting to take the trip of a lifetime, containing information on specialist schemes and opportunities for professionals and mature travellers. Covers everything from what to pack to paying the mortgage when away, as well as advice from adult gappers who have been there and done it.”

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

Job Search Strategy: Who do you want to be?

Job Search Branding: Knowing Who You Are

Job search branding is an important part of your job search strategy. Having a clear brand/identity is important in job search. Here Wendy Smith, our principal coach, provides some advice.

When looking for work, it is important to think about Job Search Brandinghow you wish to appear to potential employers. “Branding yourself” sounds crude but it is a key part of job search. You need to think about the needs of your target audience and what you want them to know about you.

What is your story?

You have a unique story to tell and that story is what makes your brand authentic. Of course others can relate to your story because it may be similar, but it is never exactly the same. Each story is unique. Focus on those things that make you unique and capitalise on them. Perhaps the particular talents and experience that got you into your most recent role are those you need to focus on. But remember, times, and employer’s needs, do change. At the end of the day though, it is your character and story that will be compelling and mark you out from others.

What do you want to be known for?

Having an answer to this question defines what your target audience can expect from your contribution. Remember, this statement is NOT your title! It is also not your personal mission or life purpose. It is a memorable one to two sentence statement that shows the employer who you are and how you will meet their needs. Keep it focused on results and make it memorable.

If you need help preparing your job search branding, please get in touch. Remember, we offer a trial free half hour coaching session by phone or Skype.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

 

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

When Panic Becomes the Norm at Work!

When Panic Becomes the Norm at Work!

panicWork panic is more common than you may realise.

A culture at work that accepts panic as normal leads to lots of unhappiness and stress. Your quality of work falls and often it is a home for bullies.

Many moons ago I worked for an organization where panic was the cultural norm. If people were not running round the corridors screaming at each other about what needed to be done, the boss thought they were too stupid to understand the priorities. If not that, then he thought they lacked motivation.

That culture led to lots of unhappiness and a significant amount of bullying. On top of that, the quality of the work delivered was never better than just good enough and often not that. Given this was a finance section responsible in those days for overseeing huge budgets, the results were pretty disastrous.

The experience of panic

I went into the section with a reputation as a good manager who was capable of first rate work. But I lacked the confidence necessary to reject the culture. By the end of six months, I was panicking and shouting at people too.

One day the consequences were brought home to me in a way that is still painful to remember. At a performance review, a member of my team had the courage to tell me what effect my behaviour, as his manager, was having on him. I have never felt more ashamed.

His courage gave me the confidence to confront my own manager about the climate he and I had created. He didn’t like hearing it and he didn’t want to change. In the end, when I threatened to move, he agreed to try another way. It wasn’t easy for him but he made the effort and we were lucky that the team gave us the benefit of the doubt and were prepared to work with us. The results were impressive and we never went back to “running round like headless chickens”.

What about you?

Do you work in an organisation where panic is the norm? What is it like to work there and what is the effect on you and your own standards? Don’t wait as long as I did to accept that change is needed. Do what you can to bring about that change.

If you can’t bring about change, then move on. Think whether you will want to look back and remember this experience. Do you really want to share responsibility for the harm it can cause you and the people round you?

If you need help handling a problem at work please get in touch. Remember I offer a trial free half hour coaching session by phone or Skype.

Wendy Smith is a career, life and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can book a discussion with Wendy about your coaching needs and your personal development at this link

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

How to handle a jealous boss

How to handle a jealous boss

Bosses, like all of us, come with the whole range of human emotions and one of them can be jealousy. So here is some advice on how to handle a jealous boss.

jealous
How to handle a jealous boss

Jealousy is usually shown in quite subtle ways in the early stages.  Hence, you might find yourself relegated to the dreary corner. You might be given little interesting work or, sometimes, just too much work. Perhaps, you might be subject to sarcastic comments. Your manager might just find fault with everything you do or start to niggle away at a few small faults you do have. In these circumstances you need to know how to handle a jealous boss.

Steps to take!

First, directly confronting a jealous boss rarely works. Go carefully, particularly if you need to keep the job. It is sad, but in most organisations, unless there is a clear case of bullying, reporting your boss rarely turns out well. The benefit of the doubt will usually be given to the more senior party. Calling on the support of senior contacts against your boss might well rebound. They may not thank you for the information. They may value your boss for his/her technical abilities and your boss may have an othrwise good record.

Hard as it sound, the best approach is usually to make your boss feel you are on their side. They need to believe that, even though you might have it in you to upstage them, you will never do so. They need to feel that you really will support them.

Show your boss that you respect their expertise and ask for their advice. It might be difficult for you at first because you feel that you too are an expert. But it will help to build your relationship.

Make sure you try to make your boss look good. Be ready to share your ideas and even sometimes have your ideas presented as theirs.  If you have contacts higher up the office, be ready to share them with your boss. And, if your boss has unsung talents, make sure your senior contacts know about them.

Overall!

Keep your dignity but turn yourself into an asset for your boss, and not a threat.

If you do find yourself relegated to the dreary corner, see what you can do to brighten things up. In most kinds of work , there is some opportunity to make a positive mark if you look for it.

I hope this advice on how to handle a jealous boss works for you. But if it doesn’t you need to take action. Working with such a person is likely to have a long-term effect on your confidence.  You may find your reputation is at real risk and this could effect your future career opportunities. So why not take advantage of my offer a free half hour coaching session to discuss how to go forward. Book a discussion here.

How did your boss get this way?

So, imagine it! There is your boss, a senior manager who has worked hard to get to that level. He/she is good at what they do and they know it. But they are not always sure those above appreciate them. Then, along comes this bright, often young, team member. Sometimes this new team member might be popular or attractive. It might appear to the boss that for them everything comes effortlessly. Those parts of the work that the boss finds difficult, the newcomer might find easy. Plus the boss’s own boss might have begun already to notice the new person. Can you see how a jealous boss might begin to emerge?

So what happens?

Here’s how the boss might start to think:

  • Should we put him/her to work in some obscure corner on something that will give them no opportunity to shine?
  • Should we find fault with everything they do, so that in due course their confidence is destroyed?
  • Should we start to niggle away about the faults they do have being bright but young or inexperienced?
  • We could sow the seeds of doubt couldn’t we?

Of course, all these are risky strategies for the boss and make the whole team feel bad.  But, sadly, there are bosses around who make these kinds of bad choices.

Advice for bosses who might be just a little bit jealous!

Why not take your bright young team member and put them to work on the area of work that really challenges. Praise and encourage them because they will help to make you look good. Why not you make sure your boss knows that you spotted a new  talent. Then you have a good chance of being known for your incredible management abilities. Isn’t that a better option?

Wendy Smith has written a little eBook on How to get on with your boss you can find it here 

Wendy is a career, life and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with the life’s more challenging personal issues.Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

Book a discussion about your coaching needs or
Email info@wisewolfcoaching.com or ring 020 8123 9146 to find out more

Your December Stock-take: Time for a Review

Your December Stock-take: Time for a Review

Your December Stock-take! Once a year it is a great thing to undertake a personal stock-take. This can give you the foundation for facing the New Year with confidence. The purpose of this review is to gain insight into some key dimensions of your work and life and to give you more clarity in career development.

Your career priorities change as your life and learning progresses. Regular review is integral to your continuing professional development.

Here are some questions to ask. You could try to get feedback from those around you as well as your self-evaluations.

What motivates you?

Understanding what is most important to you helps you make career choices founded on what motivates and satisfies you. You are then much more likely to achieve career fulfilment.

  1. What are your career priorities?
  2. Does your current job match your career priorities?
  3. What if anything is lacking?
  4. What could you do to bridge the gaps?
  5. What do you consider are your most significant achievements so far and what did you learn from achieving them?
  6. What didn’t go so well and what did you learn from that.

Work-life

The following questions help you identify your levels of accomplishment and work preferences. They could provide insight into how you might develop areas that are weak. They also help you make career choices that capitalise on your areas of strength and enjoyment, whilst reducing involvement in weaker or less enjoyable areas.

  1. What are the main tasks of your current work?
    • Tasks you perform well are…
    • Tasks you perform less well are…
    • Tasks you enjoy are…
    • Tasks you do not enjoy are…
  2. What are your key areas of expertise?
  3. Which of these areas do you need to develop further to enhance your effectiveness and career prospects? How could you do this?

Your skills

Compile a list of skills you use in that each of your work areas.

  1. What are your strongest skills?
  2. What are your weakest skills?
  3. What are the skills you need to work on to ensure you can do your current work effectively?

Work/life balance

To lead a happy and healthy life we all need to balance life at work with life outside work!

  1. Are you content with the balance between your work and life outside work?
  2. Are you content with the time you have for leisure, sport, relaxation?
  3. Do you have sufficient time for friends and family?
  4. What could you do to gain a better work/life balance? Could you ask for flexible working arrangements, for example?
  5. Is there work you need to do on your personal relationships? How will you do this?

Your network

Review your friend and contact list. This is your key development resource, whether looking for support, for a new job or looking for ways to develop within your current role. Advice, insight and information and support are all available from the people around you.

What can you do to develop your network?

Personal constraints overall

Sometime the barriers to our success come from within ourselves.

  1. Are there any internal constraints or de-motivators within you; pressures, negative thinking, health and fitness, or time issues holding you back from reaching your full potential?
  2. How could you overcome these?
  3. Should you seek help – for example from a coach?
  4. Who can you rely on to support your career development?

Career goals

Most successful people have set out with a goal. Often that goal changes along the way but it has still been a stimulus to action.

  1. What are your short-term career aspirations?
  2. What are the skills you need to develop to ensure you reach your short-term goal?
  3. What are your longer-term career aspirations?
  4. What are the skills you need to develop to ensure you reach your ultimate career goal?
  5. Where next?

If you are clear about your aims you are ready to begin planning how will you get there.

If you are unsure about your future career direction, then you may need help. Remember I offer a trial free half hour coaching session by phone or Skype.

Warm regards

Wendy
wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com
http://wisewolfcoaching.com

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Follow Companies on Popular Social Media Sites to Keep Up to Date in Your Industry

Follow Companies on Popular Social Media Sites to Keep Up to Date in Your Industry

Today we have an article from Tamara M. Williams who loves learning about Career Development. She shares her knowledge and experiences in her articles. She also posts articles on other topics so visit her EzineArticles’ profile to learn more.

In order to grow in your career you should try to keep abreast of your industry. While this might seem like you need to visit every site you should just stick with the ones that bring varied content. A lot of companies have LinkedIn, Google+ and many other social media profiles. If you want to take advantage of the information that they share then just follow them on these sites to learn more about them. Each site offers simple ways to find your target companies. Use these methods so that you are always on the forefront of the latest happenings.

The first step is to determine which career you will be focusing on, companies that you want to work for and those that are in the same industry. Then the second step is to visit their website. On each website, look for their social media buttons and follow them. This means that when they post new information you will see them on your social media homepage. Using a mixture of social media sites also allows you access to various media content that will make the information a richer and deeper experience.

LinkedIn

First, visit LinkedIn and find the Search bar at the top of the page. Since you want to connect with various companies then start typing the names of one that you already know of. When the results show up, look under the Companies headings in the search results and click the company name. You will be taken to the Company’s Profile page. Select the Follow button at the top. You can view the other tabs for Career, and Products and Insights. Now that you are a follower, you will receive updates on your home page when there are job openings, news on products and services, and other great pieces of information. You can also find out if anyone in your network works at the company and can connect with them if you wish to. Next look at the right columns for the headings: “Persons also viewed” to see a list of similar companies. Go ahead and follow those as well. The more companies you connect with the more you will learn about each company and their respective industries.

Google+

Apart from LinkedIn, companies also have a Goole+ Profile. So after you have a list of companies that you wish to follow then navigate to Google+. Again look for the Search bar at the top and start typing the name of the company. Select the company name and once you are on their profile page then look for the Follow button. You can add them to a specific group if you wish. You can view the other tabs for Posts, Photos and YouTube if you want to get more information. In Google+, they share a lot more images and videos so gathering information is fun. You can also find out who are in their Circles if you wish to follow those persons and companies as well. Once you get back to your Google+ homepage then you will see the latest posts made from all the companies that you follow. Of course, you can return to a specific company whenever to want to get more details.

LinkedIn and Google+ are just a few ways to follow companies of interest and stay updated on the latest careers, products and services and other insights being shared. Using these social media networks to boost your career development is easy since you get all the updates on your homepage. This saves you the trouble of going to each company’s website or profile page when you need the latest information. Of course, still feel free to visit their websites because you get more detailed information there.

About the Author:
Tamara M. Williams loves learning about Career Development. She shares her knowledge and experiences in her articles. She also posts articles on other topics so visit her EzineArticles’ profile to learn more.

Find related articles at
http://ezinearticles.com/?expert=Tamara_M._Williams

Defining Your Value in the Workplace By Ilchi Lee

Defining Your Value in the Workplace By Ilchi Lee 

Today we are privileged to have a guest post from the well known author and educator, Ilchi Lee.  Ilchi Lee has spent nearly three decades helping people create better lives for themselves.

Since you are here looking for ideas on finding a job or for keeping the one you have, it’s helpful to think first about what value you bring to your workplace. I think the value you bring to your job or any endeavor comes from your true value.

Sometimes we can get lost in believing that other people will give us clues that let us know how well we “measure up” when compared to others. We absent-mindedly use these clues to decide our value in the workplace and the world. But, what if you decided that the opinion of others is not in favor of you? You could easily become less efficient and less dedicated to your job or your life. At work, this would have a negative impact for you and for the company that pays you to think on their behalf for their business. And in life, it could certainly demotivate you.

From my own early experiences I discovered that my true value did not depend on the evaluation of others. This lesson did not come easily at first, and I searched my own creativity for ideas that would let me experience my own value in this world. What I discovered was, when my idea helped others to discover a greater vision for the community and for other individuals is when I knew I had true value and purpose here. And this is true for you!

It can be easy to think of ourselves as separate from others. This is what allows us to imagine their opinions and consider them as a measure for how to value ourselves. However, if we can understand the way that energy is present in all things, we realize that we are not so separate after all! From this perspective, we can define our own value for ourselves by initiating and participating in efforts that benefit others and are for the greater good.

Operating with this awareness, you will radiate a quality of energy that communicates apart from your resume and beyond the words spoken in your interview that cannot be mistaken. Whether we are talking about the company, or the world, this is where your true value lies.

Byline:

Ilchi Lee is the author of 36 books including The Call of Sedona: Journey of the Heart, a New York Times bestseller, and his latest, Change: Realizing Your Greatest Potential. A visionary and educator, he has spent nearly three decades helping people create better lives for themselves. Lee has created Dahn Yoga, Brain Education, and hundreds of other wellness programs and methods. A model for the self-improvement he teaches, Ilchi Lee is continually changing and continually creative. Find articles and videos based on his methods at http://www.ChangeYourEnergy.com. Learn more about Ilchi Lee at http://www.ilchi.com.