Job Interview – Say Thank You After

Job Interview – Say Thank You After

job interviewJob Interview – say thank you after by email, letter or even by text but you can’t avoid it.  It has become so much of a custom that some employers think less of you, if you don’t do it.

Send your thanks within 24 hours of being interviewed, if you can, and you need to tailor your letter it to suit the organization!  The style should reflect the kind of organization and the type of interview you’ve had; a formal process requires a formal response.

If you are not sure what to write, then you can use a thank you letter template as a guide.

Your letter is a chance to emphasize what a good fit you are for the job.  Even, if you have decided the organization is not one you want to join, still send polite thanks. Who knows what the future holds?

You can use the letter to reinforce what a good fit you are for the job, now that you know more about it.  And your letter is a good opportunity to flag up things they need to know but didn’t ask at the interview. You can add what you didn’t mention or make something clearer.

If you have some information that might be useful to them or thoughts on helping to solve an issue they raised, that can make you to stand out from the crowd.

Some people recommend writing to everyone you spoke to in the organization. But, personally, I prefer to write to the person who is leading job search within the organization.

Remember to proof-read your letter carefully – nothing is more off-putting than reading a letter from a candidate that includes typos. If you are not sure of the spelling of names and the correct titles, then ring the organization to check.

Timing comes before creative brilliance – get your letter in as soon as you can – most organizations make their minds up about interviewees pretty quickly.

Working with a coach really can make your job search zing! Get in touch at the email address below.
Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

Toxic Manager – how to respond

Toxic Manager – how to respond

Danger – Red Light flashing. Toxic Manager About!

How well do you get on with your manager? Easy question really, isn’t it? You would be surprised how many people are not clear about the answer. They don’t know what the manager/team leader/supervisor really thinks about them, or the work they do. Sometimes, this is because they, themselves, lack the communication skills necessary to understand the message the manager is sending. Sometimes, it is because the manager doesn’t communicate well with the rest of the team.

Getting on well with the boss matters hugely in terms of your career success. Plus, the stress caused when things go wrong can have a negative effect on your health and well-being. Stress can lead to anxiety and depression which in turn affect life at home as well as at work.

You can find out how you’re doing by listening and watching how the person in charge behaves. You need to observe not only how they behave with you, but also how they behave with other people. It is easier, of course, if you have frequent contact with your manager. But, even if you do not, you can try to learn as much as possible about them and how they behave from others. Ask your questions with care, though, you don’t want it to get back that you think you may have a problem.

Here is a mini-health-check based on one in my little eBook; “How to Get on With Boss.”  It will help you get clearer about the relationship climate in your workplace.

Signs that all is well;

  • You belong to a happy team who work well together
  • You feel accepted by all
  • Each day your manager greets you and the others by name
  • Everyone feels at ease with him/her
  • You get regular and constructive feedback from your manager
  • You are not worried about asking for help when you need it
  • If something does go wrong you feel you can tell your manager about it and get a reasonable response.

If most of these things are happening for you, all is well and you are getting on well with our manager. Celebrate because, unfortunately, I suspect you are one of the happy few.

Signs that all is not well;

  • The team is generally unhappy
  • Everyone moans about your manager
  • The manager doesn’t seem to know who you are
  • The manager doesn’t seem to want to know anything about you
  • They don’t offer support
  • Feedback, if you get it, is definitely not positive
  • People are afraid to ask for help
  • Everyone is frightened of telling the boss when something goes wrong
  • People feel threatened
  • There is lots of gossip but no one really knows what is going on “up the line” or elsewhere in the organization

Signs like this mean that all is not well. Neither you, nor the other members of the team, are getting on with the person in charge. You need to take action to ensure your toxic manager doesn’t damage you, your career, your health or your happiness. You can find out more about my little eBook at this link.

Working with a coach really can help you be a better manager. Get in touch at the email address below – I offer a free half hour trial session by phone or Skype.
Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

Working With a New Boss

Working With a New Boss

Working With a New Boss

Working with a new boss can be a challenge, But here are some tips to help you prepare,

Rumours fill a vacuum

Before a new boss arrives you may here all kinds of rumours about them, some good and some perhaps worrying. Stay calm but keep your wits about you till you have some real news. Once you have a name for your new boss, do your own research. Find out as much as possible about them but stay in a neutral space. Don’t add to the rumor mill and don’t assume that reputations are always justified. Give your new boss a chance.

Give the new boss some space 

When the new boss arrives, give them time and space to settle in. Don’t rush to be the first to make a good impression – there will be lots of people doing  just that.  But be courteous and welcoming – be optimistic.  Do your job as well as you can. 

Help when it is needed

 Show you are willing to help and support when your new boss needs help.  Make it clear you are happy to share your knowledge of the organization and to make introductions. Accept that your new boss will have their own way of doing things. And too much “this is how we do things here” from you, will really irritate.

Be authentic 

Be yourself with the new boss and don’t pretend to know more than you do.  If they ask a question you can’t answer, then offer to go and find out. Don’t bluff. If they are any good they will see straight through it. Above all, don’t pretend to be someone in the organization that you are not. Pretending to be on first name terms with the CEO can rebound on you. 

An opportunity to make a fresh start

Most new bosses will have made some inquiries about key people in their new team.  But there is probably still a chance to make a fresh start.  As you get to know your new boss, take the opportunity to make a positive impression.  Show how good you are. And, when the new boss has settled in, make sure they know how interested you are in your own career.

What about new bosses who want to bring in new teams?

Some new bosses do prefer to bring in new teams. In your research before the new boss arrives, you may be able to find out if this so. Have done in the past?  If so, do all the things, I’ve suggested above. Give your new boss an opportunity to see how valuable and how flexible you can be.  Show them that you can adapt to the new situation. But be realistic – brush up your CV and keep an eye open for other possibilities. Make sure you line-up your old boss up to give you a glowing reference.

Working with a new boss – accept the new situation

Accept that change happens.  Things cannot stay the same, so accept that with grace.  You may be sorry to see your old boss go. But the future is full of new possibilities.  Do your best to make the most of the opportunity..

You will benefit from the support of a coach in dealing with your change.  My email address is below.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

How do people engage at work?

How do people engage at work?

How do people engage at work? Research by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD) and Kingston University Business School’s Centre for Research in Employment, Skills and Society (CRESS) has shown that people engage for vastly different reasons. The research has emphasized the distinction between people who do their job mainly to earn a living and others whose emotional attachment is much wider. Their engagement can extend to the organization itself and to colleagues, line managers and customers.

Those engaged primarily with their jobs may well enjoy and take pride in their individual work. But they just want to do it and get on with rest of their lives. It is interesting that the study found that these people who are mainly interested in the technicalities of own work (transactionally engaged) report higher levels of stress. They seem to have more difficulties in achieving a work-life balance than those who are emotionally engaged with the organization.

It can become more complicated when, for example. someone is emotionally engaged mainly with their profession and perhaps even their clients. However they are only transactionally engaged with their current role and the current organisation.

This presents some interesting challenges for those leading change. How they communicate about the change to meet the needs of such a complicated audience.

A change that is being made for the perceivable good of the organization is more likely to be supported by someone emotionally engaged with that organization. The well being of colleagues may well be will be seen to be a priority and so will a clear commitment to manage the change well.

However, a change that threatens the work of an individual who is transactionally engaged may present a much greater risk. Most change managers have encountered the committed and brilliant technical specialist who decides they have no alternative but to subvert a change for the good of their work.So how can you respond?

Well, for a start you need to understand your group. Have a care with the results of engagement surveys which may not distinguish between different kinds of engagement.

What kind of people are in your group and what kind of work do they do? Walk the talk – get out there and meet them. Have conversations and be prepared to listen and to deal with feelings and anxiety.

When you communicate the change be aware that the impact will be different for different kinds of people. Take those different needs into account when you are planning the message. Then recognize the risk that different kinds of engagement might present. If your change threatens the organization itself then you need to manage the risk that presents for those committed to it. But handled the right way they will come with you on the journey.

Those committed mainly just to the job may well simply remove themselves. You risk losing their precious technical skills if they can see nothing in the change for them. If their skills are critical to the organization you may need to consider incentives to stay. These could range from money to opportunities for professional development or even enhanced technical facilities.

As with all change programs, success lies with inspiring people to follow the vision. But that inspiration may come with different strokes for very different kinds of folks

If you need the support of a coach in developing your career as change leader or change manager, then get in touch.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

Job Seeking While You Are In Work

Job Seeking While You Are In Work 

Job Seeking while you are in work does not necessarily mean you are unhappy in your present job. People who are very happy in their Job Seeking While You Are In Work present roles, loyal to their present employers and serious about career development, do look round. What else might be out there?

When you start a new role, you often have a three-part cycle in your mind;

  1. In the first period, things are fresh. You are learning about the new organization and its customers/users. Getting to grips with office politics, you make yourself part of the team and build your relationship with the boss.
  2. The second period is spent making your mark/ Time to excel in the role. Now, you become invaluable to the boss. You start to innovate. This is the time to bring in your new ideas.
  3. You move  on to the last period. Time for a move perhaps? This could be moving up in the same organization; or sideways to extend your professional experience. But if there are no opportunities for career development where you are, you start looking round outside.

If all is well, your boss will not want you to go and an opportunity might be made for you. If there are no possibilities and you are serious about career progression, start looking round.

This is healthy. However, you need to handle this third stage with care. You do not want to find yourself being forced to move because the boss has doubts about your loyalty.

Commit to

  • Continuing to deliver good quality of work in your present role.
  • Nursing and developing your relationships within the organization.
  • Making it clear you would like to develop your career further but will stay loyal. 

If your employer values your contribution, there may be more they can do for you. For example, they may not be able to pay for more training. But they may be able to give you some time for study while you pay the fees.

Job seeking while you are in work – be imaginative

Be imaginative and be flexible. Continue to learn and continue to look for new ways to innovate in the work you are doing. Help your present organization to survive and thrive while you do so too.

Don’t lose your ambitions and your wish to develop your career.

Yes, do keep your eyes open for other possibilities. Have a well planned exit strategy if something does come up. Don’t dump on your present employer. Look after their interests as well as your own. It will pay dividends in the future and who know what else that may hold.

If you would like support in developing your career, get in touch. My email address is below.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

How To Get Promoted Part 2

How To Get Promoted Part 2

Career Development – Get that Promotion; Part 2

How To Get Promoted – are you doing well in your present role but feel ready Get Promotedfor the next step up? Even in this tough economic climate some people are still managing to get promotion. But how do you make yourself part of that élite group? This is the second in a two post series.  Here is a link to Part 1 – link

How To Get Promoted – Last week I suggested that you should;

  • Create a portfolio of work you have done, showing your value to the organization,
  • Volunteer for more responsibility,
  • Create your own opportunity,
  • Let your ambition show but with discretion,
  • Ask for a private meeting to discuss properly how you are doing.
  • Now here are a further six tips to help you on your way.

Take a deep breath and blow your own trumpet

It is OK to do so if you know the notes to play. You can afford to brag a little, but with care. It doesn’t hurt to remind your boss of your accomplishments. Bosses are human and they do forget things; it helps if you can prompt and do it with facts and figures. Saying you are the Greatest may raise some laughs but that kind of bragging won’t make the kind of impression you want. If you have reduced costs or made some other improvement – quote the numbers. Make sure you concentrate on what is good about your performance, putting down someone else’s performance to make you look good isn’t impressive.

Blackmail doesn’t usually work

Avoid threats and demands. Making your boss squirm is not going to make them want to go out of their way to help you. Threatening to leave will not make your boss think better of you. Using it as blackmail can rebound and lead to doubts about your loyalty. Stay calm and if you feel frustrated, try not to show it.

Have friends in high places

Mentors further up the line are always valuable. If you can get someone on your side before you ask for promotion, it offers great benefits. You will be better informed about what life is like higher up. And it will show your boss you are serious about getting on. It gives you informal influence (outside the organization chart) and it will give you a friendly ear if things get a little tough.

Shine in your present post

Your present role gives you the opportunity to show what you can do. Push it as far as you can – go the extra mile. Work out what excellence really means in the job you do and make that the standard! Beat the deadlines and make a reputation for solving problems. That way you become someone who everyone wants on their team and they can see what an asset you will be at a more senior level. But don’t be personally indispensable. Build a structure that means the your team can function well without you, but make sure people know that it is your team. That way your boss won’t be so scared of losing you that they block your promotion.

Model more senior behaviour

Note how senior people in your organization behave. How do they talk, behave and think? Pick someone you admire and respect. Now use them as a role model. Start to behave in the way that you would like to be perceived.

Keep learning

Take every opportunity to learn more about your field, your profession and the organization in which you work. It will better equip you for a more senior role and it will also impress your boss. It will show that you are serious. About promotion. You will find lots of self-study material on-line which makes it a little easier to combine study with full-time work. No, it isn’t easy to study when you are working but if it is a real investment in you.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

How To Get Promoted

How To Get Promoted

Career Development – Get that Promotion; Part 1

How To Get Promoted – are you doing well in your present role but feel ready How To Get Promotedfor the next step up? Even in this tough economic climate some people are still managing to get promotion. But how do you make yourself part of that élite group? This is the first in a two post series – here is the link to the second post – link.

Create Your Portfolio

Lots of people simply work away at the job – just getting on with it. They deliver lots of good things but they keep a very low profile and no one notices. Make sure you can prove the results you have achieved and make sure the right people know about them. Put together a portfolio of the work you have done, showing your value to the organization.

Put in the numbers. Show how, and by how much, you have helped the organization. Prepare a presentation based on your portfolio and ask your boss for the opportunity to show it to them. This is particularly useful when you want your boss to sponsor you for a promotion – you need to give your boss the facts they need to support your case. If you want them to fight for you, you need to give them the ammunition.

Volunteer for more responsibility

Tell your boss you are ready, willing and able to take on more responsibility. Show how you would set about dealing with a more diverse workload. Make clear that it isn’t the status you will relish, but the work itself. Give your boss the opportunity to give you new and different tasks. Then, when you have built your tasks up to well exceed your job specification, prove it and show your boss what you are achieving. Now, ask for recognition in terms of your boss supporting your bid for promotion.

Create your own opportunity

Can you see an opportunity in your organization;  a potential role that no one else has thought about.  Can you show how it could help the organization and pay for itself. Is it a role that you can fill? Put the case together and have the confidence to ask to present it. Even if they don’t follow-up your ideas, you will win points for ingenuity and creativity, plus you will have demonstrated loyalty to the organization.

Let your ambition show, but with discretion

Don’t be afraid to let them know you are ambitious but do it with care. Here is an example. Do your team meet up with the boss outside the workplace? This can give you an opportunity to let your boss know about your ambitions. But you need to do it with sensitivity. People are more receptive over a drink or a meal, particularly if they are very task focussed in the office. Use this time with discretion. If you press too hard, you could make your boss and yourself feel uncomfortable. And don’t make your boss themselves feel threatened. Make it light and back off if you sense what you are saying isn’t going down well.

Ask for a private meeting

If you and your boss are really busy then trying to talk about promotion while you are working isn’t going to have the effect you want. And you need time to set out your case. Ask to set a block of time to one side to talk but don’t say specifically that you want to talk about promotion. Don’t make it too mysterious though – it is reasonable to ask for some time to talk properly about how you are doing. If you can, do your best to make sure all goes well at work in the hours before your meeting.

You can find Part 2 of Get That Promotion at this link

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

Networking and your job search!

Networking and your job search!

Job Search Part 3: What networking can do for your job search!

Networking – this is the third and last post in a short series on Job Search. In the first at this link  we said that you have a decision to make! The clearer you are about the kind of work you want, the more likely you are to be successful.

In the second post at this link,  I set out some options for you about where to look for work

Recruitment agencies
On-Line Job Sites
Contacting employers directly
LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter
Local newspapers and bulletin boards
Graduate and Intern schemes
Word of mouth – Networking
I said that I thought networking was the most effective way to look for work; so that is what we are going to tackle to-day.

Most jobs, particularly in the private sector, are never advertised at all. You find out about those jobs through talking to people – networking.

Letting people you know, and people they can introduce you to, know what you have to offer, really does bring new opportunities. These contacts can offer advice from own their experiences of job search. They can tell you about the sector they work in and they can introduce you to others, so that your network expands.

But networking is more than just asking for help! You need to make it a two-way conversation. In order to receive, you should be ready to give.

So what have you got to share in this conversation? Well, you can be an attentive audience! You can listen with real interest, attention and respect to what they have to say. Plus you can share your own knowledge. You can talk about your own sector and you can share your own contacts. Sometimes people are really grateful for an opportunity to talk about what is happening to them at work. Play your part and offer support when it is needed.

Make it an ongoing and mutual conversation. You can become ambassadors for each other and connect each other with new possibilities.

You can network beyond your existing circle. For example at a meeting of your professional organization. If you don’t already belong to the professional organization for your sector, now is the time to join. It can be expensive but it is a really good investment. Your professional organization can help you keep you up to date with developments in your profession and in your market sector, It can give you early warning about possible changes legislation. Knowing about new trends helps you to keep up personal development even though you are out of work. Most importantly when you are out of work it provides a way to stay linked-in to the world of work.

You can network, as well, at events like job fairs which are intended to bring employers together with potential new employees. And if you are thinking of making a career change into starting your own business, lots of business networking events are held for you each week.

Networking is having a conversation

Remember, the keys to success on any networking occasion are establishing a relationship and having a conversation. It is about showing you are someone they want, but it is not about selling yourself in a way that embarrasses you or the people you talk to. Have a short description of who you are and what you do crafted before you arrive. But have a care with the traditional elevator pitch about what you have to offer at work. Have one ready but use it with care and discretion. Too many people at networking events treat them as opportunity to sell themselves rather than to make contacts.

Try to remember something particular about each of the new contact that you make. Find a quiet place to make a couple of notes after your conversation. Then follow up after the event in a way that shows you can add value. For example, if someone has a particular interest find a book or a newspaper article that you can send to them.

To network wel,l you need to understand the networking process and have the confidence to take an active part in it. If you would like one to one advice on networking email me. I am happy to offer readers of this blog a free half hour coaching session by phone or Skype

I know you can get that job you have hoped for and I would like to help you. My contact details are below

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

 

Where to look for work

Where to look for work.

Job Search Part 2: Where to look for work.

Where to look for work – in the first post at this link we asked about the kind of

where to look for work

work you are looking for! The clearer you are about the kind of work you want, the more likely you are to be successful. I asked you to decide

  • Whether this was going to be a career or were you looking for work so that you can pay the bills and keep yourself?
  • What you really enjoy doing and what do you dislike?
  • What you are good at?
  • How do you want to work?
  • What kind of organization do you want to work for?
  • How much do you need to earn?

Now you have the answers to those questions, you are ready to begin your job search. Now we are going to consider where you should start looking. I am going to list your options and tell you little about each one.

Where to look for work.

The Best Method – Word of mouth – Networking

Most jobs, particularly in the private sector are never advertised at all. You find out about those jobs through friends, acquaintances and relatives – in other words through networking. For example keeping in touch with a former colleague who has also moved on to a new employer might mean you find out about a new post in their organization that is a good fit for you. Networking events, conferences and exhibitions can be a rich source of new contacts. Networking is such an important subject that I’m going to devote a post to that alone. it will be the next post in this series.

Recruitment agencies

These days most people sign up with one or more recruitment agencies. It is a good idea to make contact with several – you can find lots of them on-line. They are a good way to keep up to-date with what is going on in the job market. Many agencies will have a mix of permanent and interim/contract roles. Some agencies specialise in particular sectors so check whether there is one in your field. Register with the agencies you feel comfortable with – beware of scam agencies (such as, any that asks for a fee to join). A good agency will keep you up to date with their vacancies. Most recruitment agencies do a good job for employers and job seekers. Note that high levels of job searchers in the recent past has meant people without real ability have set themselves up as recruiters. Ask plenty of questions and ask friends and relatives for recommendations

On-Line Job Sites

On line job sites give you immediate access to all kinds of jobs and you can search them in your own time at home. More and more employers are using sites like http://www.monster.co.uk and http://www.reed.co.uk to find new staff. You will usually find these sites give lots of other resources to help you in your job search. Take time to browse and get a real feel for what is available. Before you search, think carefully about the key words related to your interests that you will use to find possible jobs. Use their user guides to make the most of the sites.

Contacting employers directly

As I say above most vacancies, particularly in the private sector, are never advertised. They are filled by people already known to the employer. So, of course, it is worthwhile making yourself known. There is no reason you should not ask about jobs available. If an employer can fill a job without advertising, it saves them time and expense. Even though they don’t have vacancies when you inquire, if you make the right impression, they may contact you in the future. Find out as much as you can before you approach them, then tailor your CV appropriately. Most people try to find out the name of person responsible for hiring new staff and write to them. Others have success by approaching a senior executive in the department where they want to work directly. If you have done your home work and show a real interest in the company, you can find this direct contact can be a good way in.

LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter

Social networking is an incredibly powerful tool for the job seeker. LinkedIn in particular is a powerful business networking tool used directly by employers to find staff and by head-hunters and recruitment agencies. Keep your own profile clean, up to date and professional. Use social media as well as LinkedIn to help you research organizations in your job search.

Follow the organizations you are interested in, for possible recruitment activity as well as other news. Make sure that your social activity doesn’t weaken your opportunities. Remember everything you post is out there for a prospective employer to see – make it work for you.

Local newspapers and bulletin boards

Local companies still advertise with local newspapers and use their online bulletin boards. So don’t ignore them. Find out which day your local paper is published and, more importantly, which day they advertise jobs. Contact them and let them know the type of work you want, your skills and your experience. They may know of a suitable position or let you know if anything comes into the office.

Graduate and Intern schemes

If you are a recent university graduate (or about to become one) you should consider graduate schemes in your field of interest. They can be a fast track to the top but sometimes they have a high rate of attrition. Find out as much as you can about them and the history of the intern scheme before you commit. There will be information about how to apply on the organization’s website. They are usually very heavily subscribed so don’t take it personally, if you are not one of the very lucky few. But it is always worth giving it your best shot.

Internships are often very poorly paid. But they can provide valuable experience and a way into particular fields – for example, in the media, If you are young, don’t have work experience, and you can afford it, they are a good option. Again, you can research them on-line and you will find them on sites like Reed and Monster.

 

Organize Your Job Search

Where to look for work – be methodical in your approach. Make sure you keep track of who you have contacted and the stage you’ve reached with each one. This means you will be able to follow them up effectively and not duplicate your efforts. Keep a mini-file for each job application and record feedback if you are unsuccessful. Keep background files on the organizations you would like to work for . When you tailor your CV, keep a copy in your portfolio file for future use.

In Part 3 at this link, we’ll see what networking can do for your job search. Please feel free to get in touch if you would like some further help. Working with a coach does improve your chance of success. Email me at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com now to arrange a free half hour coaching session by Skype.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

Going for Promotion

Going for Promotion

Going for Promotion – if you have the the right qualities, prepare well and have just a little bit of luck, this could be your moment!

Now is the time to;

  • Be the one that volunteers for the difficult task.
  • Make clear that you are prepared to take on more responsibility.
  • Where you see a problem looming, be the one who comes up with a solution –
  • Be there with new and ingenious ways to cut costs
  • Have ideas for new niches
  • Have new skills if they are required
  • Prove what you can do!

Make sure the boss knows you are thinking about the organization, not just yourself!  But when you do something new or extra make sure your boss does know about it.  If it’s not possible to give you a raise now, then can you negotiate something for when things improve – get it on the record!  Can you tie how much you receive to that improvement with your present pay as a fall-back?

Go for it!  You’ve got nothing to lose and at the very worst you will be someone they want to keep around – right now that is a bonus.  Good Luck!

And if you need a little help, just get in touch with me.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link