A boss who panics

A boss who panics

Problems at work: tip on how to work with a boss who panics

Advice from Wendy Smith; Career Coach and author of “How to Get On With the Boss” – order on Amazon

A boss who panics – most people I know have worked for a boss who was subject to panic. Or at least in their view, the boss was someone subject to panic. Managers are human and being human they don’t always behave well. Good managers recognize this in themselves. They check how they are behaving and acknowledge when they need to make a change. Some managers do not. And for a number, panicking can become a habit, particularly if they feel insecure or lack confidence.

So, how should you respond?

Here are some tips on how to deal with a boss who panics.

1. Don’t join in the panic, but do show you want to help.
2. Get as much information as you can about the issue.
3. Make your own assessment – is this really is as urgent or as important as your boss is suggesting?
4. Be clear about priorities for the organization, your team and your role, as well as for key clients.
5. Are you the person best placed to handle the issue? If so, can you persuade your boss to delegate the task to you with occasional reports on progress?
6. Show you are willing to help.  Even if the issue isn’t for you, show you are willing to help and move things forward.
7. Agree clear arrangements for reporting back with your boss. Those reports may have to be more frequent than you would choose. But an agreed reporting procedure should reassure your boss and give you the space you need to complete the task.
8. Shield your team – if you are a manager yourself, then try to shield your team from the effects of your boss’s panic.
9. Reassure your boss – above all seek to reassure your boss and take responsibility for dealing with the issue if you can
10. Post action analysis – after dealing with the immediate problem, try to work out why your boss is responding in this way. Then, if you can, offer support, show loyalty and give reassurance.
11. Is the behavior really disrupting the team?  Do you have a good relationship with boss? Then afterwards try to feed back to you boss how this is affecting others and the efficiency of the group. But choose your moment with care. Don’t do it when they are feeling panicked. Offer to work with them to introduce any changes that will make them feel more comfortable.
12. If you don’t get on well with the boss, consider your options.  Consider seriously whether this job is really worth suffering the long-term effects of stress which are usually the result.

I offer a free half hour coaching session by phone or Skype that help you deal with your boss. Here is the booking link –  Book a half hour trial 

Other resources for people with problem bosses

As a coach I work with lots of people who have problems with their boss. So I wrote a little book to help them. You can help your boss help you – don’t be made unhappy, suffer stress and lose confidence because you cannot get on with the person in charge. Poor relationships at work can damage life at home as well as your career. My book can help.

Remember working with a career coach can really help you feel happier at work.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book your free 30 minute, no obligation, trial coaching session with Wendy Smith now at this Link 

 

Bad Boss: Are you exploiting your team?

Bad Boss: Are you exploiting your team?

Are you a bad boss? As a life and career coach I sometimes have clients who are unhappy at work. This can be for all kinds of reasons.  They may be in a job that doesn’t give them an opportunity to use their knowledge, skills and experience and they feel frustrated.  Or, perhaps,  they have been promoted to a new role that is a stretch too far and they are struggling.  Having too much to do and feeling stressed is a regular..  And of course we have all encountered difficult colleagues, to say nothing of unpleasant and demanding bosses.  But there is a point when an unpleasant and demanding boss can slip over the boundary into something much worse; the boss becomes just plain cruel. Sadly the bad boss phenomenon is all too common.

Most of us have read about the vile over-seers in the factories of the industrial revolution. Certainly, in the UK, employment law has made their kind of cruelty a thing of the past.

No, what I’m referring to here is a new kind of callousness!.

A new kind of bad boss!

The economic conditions of the last few years have put great pressure on organizations. For many, the ability to survive in the market place has become the overriding priority.  And the values of the organization become the values of their key employees.

Hard decisions have had to be made!  It can be difficult to hang on to your finer feelings when you have to grapple daily with who to keep and who to let go. For some, feelings for the staff they manage have coarsened.

Treating the team as something to be exploited to ensure your personal survival sounds pretty outrageous when put into words.  And there are lots of ways you can avoid facing up to what you are doing . But that is what I am hearing about from some of my clients.

People are being asked to cope with larger and larger workloads in often more unpleasant conditions.  For example, what started out as poor but passable accommodation for a call centre now houses as well much of company administration including HR.  For some, natural light is becoming a luxury!

When you complain or ask for help, the manager or supervisor doesn’t want to know – they have their own problems keeping senior management happy.  You risk finding yourself on next week’s hit list of people about to leave.

But it is short-sighted! Bad times will come to an end. When the good times come, what do you, oh mighty manager, think those employees are going to do? Well, they are not going to hang around when they have other opportunities, are they?

At the very least give your employees a hearing and if you can’t do anything right now, have the grace to apologise. And next time you are about demand something from  an employee you know is outrageous, stop and think!  Is the short term gain really in your long term interest?

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

Management: Is exploiting your team in your long-term interest?

Management: Is exploiting your team in your long-term interest?

As a life and career coach I sometimes have clients who are unhappy at work. This can be for all kinds of reasons.  They may be in a job that doesn’t give them an opportunity to use their knowledge, skills and experience and they feel frustrated.  Or, perhaps,  they have been promoted to a new role that is a stretch too far and they are struggling.  Having too much to do and feeling stressed is a regular..  And of course we have all encountered difficult colleagues, to say nothing of unpleasant and demanding bosses.  But there is a point when an unpleasant and demanding boss can slip over the boundary into something much worse; the boss becomes just plain cruel.

Most of us have read about the vile over-seers in the factories of the industrial revolution. Certainly, in the UK, employment law has made their kind of cruelty a thing of the past.

No, what I’m referring to here is a new kind of callousness!.

The economic conditions of the last few years have put great pressure on organizations. For many, the ability to survive in the market place has become the overriding priority.  And the values of the organization become the values of their key employees.

Hard decisions have had to be made!  It can be difficult to hang on to your finer feelings when you have to grapple daily with who to keep and who to let go. For some, feelings for the staff they manage have coarsened.

Treating the team as something to be exploited to ensure your personal survival sounds pretty outrageous when put into words.  And there are lots of ways you can avoid facing up to what you are doing . But that is what I am hearing about from some of my clients.

People are being asked to cope with larger and larger workloads in often more unpleasant conditions.  For example, what started out as poor but passable accommodation for a call center now houses as well much of company administration including HR.  For some, natural light is becoming a luxury!

When you complain or ask for help, the manager or supervisor doesn’t want to know – they have their own problems keeping senior management happy.  You risk finding yourself on next week’s hit list of people about to leave.

But it is short sighted really! Bad times will come to an end. When the good times come, what do you, oh mighty manager, think those employees are going to do? Well, they are not going to hang around when they have other opportunities, are they?

At the very least give your employees a hearing and if you can’t do anything right now, have the grace to apologize. And next time you are about demand something from  an employee you know is outrageous, stop and think!  Is the short term gain really in your long term interest?

Wendy is the The Career Coach – helping you to find fresh perspectives on your Job Search and Career. She helps you work towards your goals and aspirations, in a way that fits in with both work and home life. Email her at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com,  find her on Skype at wendymason14, or call +44 (0) 2081239146 (02081239146 for UK callers) or +1 262 317 9016 if you are in the US.

Book a free trial/consultation to try phone coaching from the comfort of your own home