Recruiting good people

Recruiting good people

Recruiting good people – recruiting the right people is crucial in ensuring your organization is successful.  It depends on you carrying out a number of activities.

Analyse the job

  • Analyse the job – make sure you take time to identify the competencies and experience required to do the job the standard you need. If you have an existing employee doing a similar job successfully, think about what they bring to the role
  • Write a job description that reflects what your analysis has established.
  • Create a competency framework for the role that you can send to potential candidates and by which you will judge them.
  • Write a person specification that reflects the competencies and experience required – no more and no less.

Choose the right recruitment approach

  • Choose a recruitment method and a selection procedure right and proportionate to the role. Check out a number of recruitment organizations Recruiting good peopleand ask them for advice  as well as how to create an inviting advertisement.
  • Create an interview plan showing how you will structure and carry out the interviews. It helps to have someone on the panel familiar with the work and someone who can give you an balanced view of candidates
  • Ask questions that will allow a candidate to give evidence of the competencies they have claimed. Ask for concrete examples of how they have solved the kind of problems likely to occur in your job.
  • Be fair, be open-minded and be courteous, when you interview.
  • Be ready for a good candidate to ask you some challenging questions about the work and your organization.

Recruiting the wrong person costs you money and causes disruption in the organization. It can cause low morale. If someone doesn’t really ‘fit’ they may quit very quickly and you will have to recruit all over again.  Or you are left sorting out problems. So, it worth investing in a good recruitment process.

You need a recruitment process that is

  •  EFFICIENT – cost effective
  • EFFECTIVE – attracts enough suitable candidates who are likely to fit into the organization
  • FAIR – stays inside the law in terms of avoiding unlawful discrimination and with decisions made on merit alone.

When you have a vacancy, the first thing you think of is replacing the person. But this is could be a great opportunity to consider whether the work is really needed. Also, how best to get it done. Perhaps it could be shared between existing staff. Does it really need a full-time replacement. What are the opportunities for part-time or flexible working?

I wish you good luck in the finding the right candidate for your role and if you would like some help please get in touch.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

Recruiting with Empathy

Recruiting with Empathy

Job Hunting, Recruiting and the Dangers of Lack of Empathy

Wendy Mason is a Career Coach and Life Coach helping you to solve difficult problems at work

Recruiting with Empathy – this post considers why this makes sense. Many moons ago when I was managing organizational change and the challenges of “downsizing” and “outsourcing,” I learned a salutary lesson. If the organization was going to thrive at the end of the exercise, empathy needed to exist at the beginning.

It sounds a contradiction doesn’t it? Setting out to manage what will be a painful experience for many but doing it with empathy. In my experience the most successful and well embedded changes are managed in just that way. This is not least because the communications, upon which successful change depends, require empathy with the reader in the mind of the writer.

Of course that demands a lot from the person who manages the change because they have to accept feeling the pain they are causing.

I was lucky.  My first experience of handling really painful change for a large group of people was when I was working for an enlightened employer. They provided me, as well as the staff I managed, with access to counselling. After that I learned techniques for handling my own feelings while doing a difficult job as well as I could.

What has all this to do with job hunting?

Well, now I am seeing a generation of recruiters who seem to have left their empathy at home when it comes to how they work. Candidates are being treated callously and with a lack of respect.

I really don’t know if this stems from a lack of imagination or if it is how some recruiters protect themselves from feeling overwhelmed.

What I do know is that these recruiters, who at the moment seem to be treating candidates like commodities, are thinking short-term.

The market is changing and more job opportunities are opening up. It may well not continue to be a “buyers’ market” for talented people.  Plus, some of those talented people being treating so badly could have turned into potential clients. But they will remember only too well which recruitment companies showed a lack of respect for them in their job search.

Resources for job seekers

In the job market, there are always lots of useful techniques to learn or to refresh. From writing a modern CV to wooing at the interview, you’ll find lots of tips in my handy little pocket-book.

Recruiting with empathy
A concise and practical little workbook. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

A concise and practical little work book, it is for all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

Find this and my other books on my Amazon page at this link; http://ow.ly/BRSAL

Remember working with a career coach can really help both  job search and career resilience. Get in touch at the Facing a mid-career dilemmaemail address below – I offer a free half hour trial session by phone or Skype.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book your free 30 minute, no obligation, trial coaching session with Wendy Smith now at this Link 

Recruitment: The candidate journey and employer brand by Dorothy Dalton

Recruitment: The candidate journey and employer brand

By Dorothy Dalton

Dorothy Dalton is an International talent management strategist and coach working on both sides of the spectrum in executive search and career coaching dealing specialising in transition from “hire to retire.” You can find out more about her at this link http://dorothydalton.com

The candidate journey and employer brand

Employer brand Much time is spent encouraging and coaching candidates to create and present a Personal Brand to make the right impression on potential employers. But many organisations are not as in touch as they should be with their employer brands. By that I mean how they are perceived not just by current employees, but by prospective

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Management – recruiting and selecting the right people

I want you for the Navy promotion for anyone e...

Management – recruiting and selecting the right people

Recruiting the right people is crucial in ensuring your organization performs successfully. This new series of posts will provide the guidance you need in how to recruit and select people.  It will show the contribution that you can make as a manager to that recruitment process.

We are going to look at how to

  1. Analyse the job
  2. Write a job description
  3. Create a competency framework for the role
  4. Write a person specification
  5. Choose and use a recruitment method and a selection procedure including
    1. How to create an advertisement
    2. How to create an interview plan
    3. How to carry out an interview
    4. How to select the right candidate.

Recruiting the wrong person costs you money and causes disruption in the organization. It can cause distress and low morale.

If someone doesn’t ‘fit’ they may quit and you will have to recruit all over again.  Or you are left sorting out the problems.

It is much better to have the right recruitment system in place in the first place. You need a system that is

  •  EFFICIENT – cost effective
  • EFFECTIVE – attracting enough suitable candidates who are likely to fit into the organization
  • FAIR – stays inside the law in terms of avoiding unlawful discrimination and where decisions are made on merit alone.

When you have a vacancy, the first thing you think of is replacing the person. But this is actually a great opportunity to consider whether the work is needed at all and, if so, how best to get it done. Perhaps it could be shared between existing staff or it might not require a full time replacement.

So before any recruitment activity takes place, we need to understand the role and that is done by completing a job analysis. That is what I shall write about in the next post in this series next week.  From the job analysis we shall go on to write a job description that really helps to find the right candidate.

Wendy Mason is a Life and Career Coach.  She helps people have the confidence they need to be successful at work and to change career while maintaining a good work/life balance. You can email her at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com


>Why you need to network!

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Description: Social Networking Source: own wor...  In my last post, I mentioned that Dave, like others leaving the public sector, doesn’t think networking will be the right thing for him. So today, I am going to write about the value of professional networking.

Everyone has a network of friends and contacts already.  Networks are not about exploiting people, they are about building and maintaining relationships.

In professional networking you are gathering information that may help you in your work, not just your job search.  You never know when you will need these relationships or when your contacts may need you and the information you have in return! Just like personal networks, professional networks are about reciprocal arrangements.  And personal networks and professional networks blend into each other in terms of people offering mutual support.
But let us deal with the issue of networking and job search! 

Most people leaving the UK public sector come from an environment where the rules require all new posts to be advertised.  While it is true that people find ways round the rules, that is expectation.  It is part of the culture.  

People can get very upset if they find a juicy public sector role has been filled without being advertised at least internally across the organization.  But those same people can get very upset if they a key role has been advertised outside the organization without looking first for someone inside the organization. That again is part of the corporate culture.  

In the world outside things are often different. 
As Ian Machan said here recently probably between 30% – 80% of all jobs, never get advertised – the iceberg factor.  If you spend your time just on the advertised vacancies, you have less chance of getting a post because there is far more competition for those roles. 

If you spend at least some time on the hidden, less competitive vacancies, you are raising your chances of success.  

So, it is wise to take a balanced approach, between applying for advertised posts and exploring the “hidden market.
Jobs that don’t get advertised usually get filled in one of three ways:
  • Recruitment Consultants search their files of registered applicants who are suitable candidates
  • Direct approach through networks of personal contacts and head-hunters (who again often rely on their own wide networks of contacts).
  • Previous applicantsunsolicited CVs received or near-miss candidates from previous advertising campaigns.

Small-to-medium-sized organizations (SMEs) may never advertise their jobs nationally – or at all. With far smaller recruitment budgets, these organisations prefer local or specialist publications, recruitment agencies, unsolicited and direct applications or people found through contacts.
In some larger organizations, again not all vacancies are advertised!  This is so particularly in competitive areas such as public relations, journalism or consultancy work. Employers expect applicants to take the initiative.
Some organizations prefer to hire someone we
ll known to contacts as being capable of doing a good job against the risk of an unknown “best” candidate. 

The degree of formality around filling even quite senior posts can vary widely.  This may come as something of a shock to former public sector employees.
Networking is critical in accessing this hidden market. 

There is a huge amount to be gained from developing your contacts in terms of gathering industry knowledge and hearing about these never-advertised positions.
A professional network is not just a nice-to-have; it’s a must-have source of new work, support, advice, ideas and consolation. So, strengthen relationships with people you already know and put some energy into meeting new people.
My next post will deal with your online presence, LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and the rest—they’re not just for teenagers, they are efficient and effective ways to stay in touch with a whole lot of people and to find new opportunities.

In the mean time if you need advice about networking please get in touch – my contact details are below or you can use the contact form here.