Career Development – How To Enhance Your Skills With Continuing Professional Development.

Career Development – How To Enhance Your Skills With Continuing Professional Development.

Many of us study for a professional qualification and then take up our first qualified post with a great sigh of relief.   But how do you make sure that you continue to be effective and that you keep up with new developments?  Continuing Professional Development (CPD) is the learning and development you undertake that contributes to you doing just that.  CPD can also be undertaken if you started a new job without any special qualifications but want to develop your skills to do your job better and to get to the next level.

What activities contribute to your CPD?

There are lots of activities that can add to your own CPD but you need to make sure that they really do deliver value to you as a professional. According to the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD) the kind of things that could be done include;

  1. Formal study leading to a qualification, which may be related directly related to your present job or to what you would like to do in the future.
  2. In-house or external training provided by your employer
  3. Conferences, workshops and seminars about your profession or your work sector – a great way to make contacts and find out about new developments
  4. Membership of a planning groups or committees – for example, within your employing organization or within your professional organization
  5. Work-based research – find out more from the internet or at your local library
  6. Reading professional magazines and journals – lots of these are now on line
  7. Relevant hobbies, leisure activities and voluntary work are a great way to network and make new contacts, as well as to contribute and to enjoy yourself.

Remember, the key to CPD is reflection on what you have learned and how you can apply it.

Once you understand fully what your work and your profession requires, make a plan for your CPD and make sure to keep any evidence you have of your CPD as it develops – keep certificates from previous study or training. Start a CPD portfolio.  Don’t overlook internal training – make a note of what it was and who provided it with dates – add how it changed your ability to do your work.

Your CPD record and portfolio may prove vital when you apply for jobs in the future and it will certainly be useful when you are thinking about promotion.

CPD not only helps you to improve your knowledge, skills and competence in the workplace but to achieve your career goals. Over and above this, it contributes to your lifelong learning.

The CIPD provides useful guidance on organizing your CPD, including questions to help you reflect on your learning experiences and templates for recording CPD activity. There is also a section on managing CPD while on a career break.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

Network Marketing

Network Marketing

John Rohn on Sowing and Reaping

Network Marketing – advice from John Rohn – someone we can all learn from – great fun and great lessons too!

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

John Rohn on Sowing and Reaping

John Rohn on Sowing and Reaping

Something we can all learn from – great fun but great lessons too!

Wendy Mason is a career coach.  She helps people reach their goals and aspirations, without sacrificing their home and personal life.  Before working as a coach, Wendy had a long career in both the public and private sectors in general management and consultancy as well as spells in HR.  She now divides her time between coaching and writing. You can contact Wendy at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com and find out more at http://wisewolfcoaching.com

  • Job Search: What Are Your Weaknesses?
  • Job Search – Networking – Asking Friends For Help
  • Job Search – What are the most common interview questions? Help from monster.co.uk
  • Managing Difficult Conversations:9 Questions to Ask Yourself
  • 10 Leadership Tips For First Time Managers

Leading with honor

Leading with honor

Leading with honor – leadership, determination and consistent effort

Lee Ellis is Founder & President of Leadership Freedom LLC & FreedomStar Media.
He is a leadership consultant and expert in team building, executive development & assessments. He has a new book out called Leading with Honor – leadership lessons from his time in a brutal POW camp in North Vietnam.  This is an extract from his post on Linked2Leadership.

Leading with honor – we often hear of the value of 20/20 hindsight when looking back at the past.

And for me personally, this latest chapter in my life has provided much clarity on what determination and consistent effort can do for getting better results.

In facing the second half of 2012, I believe there is great benefit and encouragement to be gained by looking back—and with my new book, LEADING with HONOR: Leadership Lessons from the Hanoi Hilton out, I’ll focus this blog entry on a pressure-tested lesson learned from the POW camps of North Vietnam in something I call:

1,955 Days—Improving My German and Chin-ups One Day at a Time

Communication Breakdown

In the early years of our POW captivity, any form of communication was forbidden between prisoners. Consequently, communicating quietly and covertly without getting caught was slow and tedious, taking much of our day.

Still, there were down times when we had to find ways to “escape” the dreary and depressing environment of a gray, smellydark dungeon, isolated from family, ten-thousand miles from home.

Making Time Count

As a goal-oriented “action” person locked in a 6.5’ x 7’ cell, I found myself driven to find ways to make the time count.

Like most of my compatriots, achievement was a high value.

It was frustrating for us because we were cut off from the normal outlets for entertainment and recreation, and especially the resources for personal growth andintellectual stimulation. We had no books or magazines and certainly no television.

Watching geckos stalk and capture bugs was a highlight.

Out of necessity and boredom, we learned the value of committing to doing something—almost anything that would give a sense of meaning.

Usually this meant a daily routine—a regimen that over time would yield progress and growth.

Get With the Program

Some guys like cellmate Glenn Myers called it a “program.” …….

You can read more of this fascinating post at this link http://linked2leadership.com/2012/07/13/on-leadership-determination-and-consistent-effort/

On Leadership, Determination and Consistent Effort

Lee Ellis is Founder & President of Leadership Freedom LLC & FreedomStar Media.
He is a leadership consultant and expert in team building, executive development & assessments. He has a new book out called Leading with Honor – leadership lessons from his time in a brutal POW camp in North Vietnam.  This is an extract from his post on Linked2Leadership.

We often hear of the value of 20/20 hindsight when looking back at the past.

And for me personally, this latest chapter in my life has provided much clarity on what determination and consistent effort can do for getting better results.

In facing the second half of 2012, I believe there is great benefit and encouragement to be gained by looking back—and with my new book, LEADING with HONOR: Leadership Lessons from the Hanoi Hilton out, I’ll focus this blog entry on a pressure-tested lesson learned from the POW camps of North Vietnam in something I call:

1,955 Days—Improving My German and Chin-ups One Day at a Time

Communication Breakdown

In the early years of our POW captivity, any form of communication was forbidden between prisoners. Consequently, communicating quietly and covertly without getting caught was slow and tedious, taking much of our day.

Still, there were down times when we had to find ways to “escape” the dreary and depressing environment of a gray, smellydark dungeon, isolated from family, ten-thousand miles from home.

Making Time Count

As a goal-oriented “action” person locked in a 6.5’ x 7’ cell, I found myself driven to find ways to make the time count.

Like most of my compatriots, achievement was a high value.

It was frustrating for us because we were cut off from the normal outlets for entertainment and recreation, and especially the resources for personal growth andintellectual stimulation. We had no books or magazines and certainly no television.

Watching geckos stalk and capture bugs was a highlight.

Out of necessity and boredom, we learned the value of committing to doing something—almost anything that would give a sense of meaning.

Usually this meant a daily routine—a regimen that over time would yield progress and growth.

Get With the Program

Some guys like cellmate Glenn Myers called it a “program.” …….

You can read more of this fascinating post at this link http://linked2leadership.com/2012/07/13/on-leadership-determination-and-consistent-effort/

Career Development – Continuing Education – The Key to Professional Growth

Career Development – Continuing Education – The Key to Professional Growth

Today we have a guest post from Katheryn Rivas who is an education writer interested in researching the opportunities an online university can provide. You can contact her at katherynrivas87@gmail.com.

We’ve heard over and over again how challenging the economy is today. With student loan debt the highest it has ever been, a steady unemployment rate, and a hugely competitive job market, very few people would deny the fact that the professional world can be unforgiving. Keeping your head above water in a climate like this is essential and one of the best ways to do so is by working to make yourself more valuable to your workplace. Continual professional development and professional growth are the best ways to remain relevant within a professional setting – you can become a student of your trade. Continuing your education with a focus on your job and industry is a worthwhile and effective step to take for your professional well-being. Consider these options for continuing education towards your professional growth.

Online Courses and Learning

There are few better ways to create more opportunities for yourself within the office than by seizing opportunities in the classroom. With advances in online technologies, there are more and more options online for individuals looking for a quality education. The online classroom provides the best possible option for individuals looking for expanded knowledge without sacrificing their nine to five schedule. Professionals can earn useful degrees, qualifications, or simply take a class or two completely online and on their own time. Many companies and employers will offer some sort of educational reimbursement for classes that relate to their area of work. If an official online college program or classes isn’t right for you, you can also consider open courseware classes. Major big name universities like MIT, Yale, Stanford, and many more offer free online versions of their classes. Look at your options and take advantage of what these institutions have to offer.

Professional Associations and Memberships

Investigate the various clubs and associations involved with your area of work or industry. Many of these clubs and association memberships can be wonderful tools for networking, expanding knowledge, and staying in touch with recent news in your field. Many employers will support employees with association memberships and they can become large pluses on an individual’s resume. No matter what area of business or industry you are active in, there are likely many different associations and professional groups dedicated to the subject.  Carefully evaluate your many options and decide which memberships seem the most useful for you and your purposes.

Educational Travel and Conferences

Conferences and professional travel, can bring huge plusses to your day-to-day work life. Of course, you can get more than just a free vacation, conferences travel can also be extremely educational and beneficial to your professional development. Research the various conferences offered related to your line of work. Because conferences can be pricy and time consuming it is important that you really research your options. Try to find the conference and lectures that you think you can really gain from. Any effort to learn more about your trade will be viewed as a positive thing in the eyes of your employer and on your resume.

Katheryn Rivas in an education writer interested in researching the opportunities an online university can provide for students. She encourages your comments at katherynrivas87@gmail.com.

Wednesday Quotes – Career Development – Taking a Sabbatical

Sabbatical

Wednesday Quotes – Career Development – Taking a Sabbatical

Sabbatical; planned time spent not working. Synonyms; Breathing space, fiesta, furlough, holiday, intermission, recess, recreation, respite, rest.  http://thesaurus.com

  1.  It is energizing and liberating to turn down a road you have not traveled before. To reach toward what you cannot yet touch brings new passion and strength to your life. Ralph Marston
  2. Disconnect with your work self on a sabbatical, and you’ll reconnect with who you really are.  Corbett Barr
  3. It’s a time to immerse yourself in a different environment, try new things, reassess your priorities, and look at your life from a different perspectiveMarelisa Fabrega
  4. Give yourself the priceless gifts of new experiences, new skills, new knowledge and the confidence of knowing how quickly you can grow. Expand your horizons, again and again, and discover that every limit is there to be transcended.  Ralph Marston
  5. Getting away from it all might be the only way you can really reset or change course. If you continue around the day-to-day, making significant changes is tough. Taking a few months off will give you the space you need to figure things out. Corbett Barr
  6. Taking a sabbatical is the first step towards discovering whether or not I can take the leap of faith and do something fully on my own.  Do anything for a while, and it becomes increasingly harder to cut the cord. Sam Dogen
  7. Of Fortune’s best 100 companies to work for in America, 21 of them have paid-for, formal sabbatical programs. It’s a competitive advantage with regard to recruiting talent. Jaye Smith
  8. Almost everybody got back to some form of better eating and exercise, and they keep that up. And they say, “I didn’t realize what stress I was under. Now I can go back for my next five years with some balance” Rita Foley
  9. My sabbatical didn’t really recharge my batteries as I hoped it would.  Instead, the sabbatical helped realize my preference for freedom over a steady paycheck at this point in my life.  I’ve experienced what life could be like if I worked for myself and I must say that I’m extremely excited about the prospects. Sam Dogen
  10. Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed in the things that you didn’t do than in the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Mark Twain

What’s your dream escape? Relaxing on a palm-studded beach? A year off to write your novel? Missionary work with the needy? Exploring ancient ruins or saving the rainforest?

Whether you’re an adventurer, a poet, a volunteer or you just need a break, Escape 101 provides you with a step-by-step system to take as much time as you need from your job, career or business, without losing ground. Escape 101: The Four Secrets to Taking a Sabbatical or Career Break Without Losing Your Money or Your Mind

New technologies and workplace pressures have extended our working days, reduced our time off, and disconnected us from our communities and societies – leading us to live our lives by rote.

Traditional “cures” for work-life imbalance, stress, boredom, and career stagnation don’t work. Vacations are too short for rest and renewal, offering but a glimpse into a world of new possibilities and beginnings. Night classes promote career growth but at the expense of stress levels and free time. Stress-reduction techniques and medication may address the symptoms of the problem but rarely the causes. Even common “work-life” solutions involving flexible working arrangements do not go far enough.

The solution to many of these problems is a planned, focused, extended break from everyday life and work – a sabbatical. This book shows how to harness the power of the sabbatical in a way that actually can enhance career and earnings prospects along with personal and spiritual factors.
Power Sabbatical: The Break That Makes a Difference

Want to be a Confident Networker? Join my free teleseminar on 26thJune 2012

Wendy Mason is a Life and Career Coach.  She helps people have the confidence they need to be successful at work and to change career while maintaining a good work/life balance. You can email her at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com

  • Job Search When You Are In Work – Career Development in a Cold Climate

  • Career Development – Dealing with a difficult boss

  • Career Development – Dealing With a New Boss

  • Career Development – do you have the right qualities to get promoted even in a recession?

Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 4 Identify what is most difficult for you

From the Motivation and emotion/Tutorials/Emot...
(Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 4 Identify what is most difficult for you

In the last post in this series I asked you to start thinking about emotions and I explained how identifying your troublesome emotion helps you gain control and make sure things turn out more positively for you in the future.

Now, you need to identify what is most difficult for you about the change. 

This is important because it helps you get to the root of the problem and so you avoid spending too much time on the peripheral issues. It saves you energy you would have spent dealing with less important aspects of your change. For example, you might feel angry about something that happened last time you tried to make this kind of change. But what really caused you to feel that way?

When you know what it is that is actually causing your big emotion, you can start to develop a more helpful attitude. 

Find a little time and a quiet space to go through this exercise. Think about what happened in the past to make you feel this way. Now imagine someone telling you the same story. What advice would you give them? Imagine questioning them about what happened and pressing them to tell you more and more about how it happened until you get right down to the root cause. Now what is that fundamental belief about themselves that is making them feel uncomfortable.

What advice would you give them to help them have a more healthy attitude? Now step into their shoes and think about you having the same experience and how you can now apply the new approach. Practice thinking in this new way. 

Success here depends on being very honest with yourself.

If you need support from a coach in sorting out the fundamental belief that is stopping you making positive changes, get in touch, my phone number is below. 

The next post in this series will be about setting goals for your change and how to avoid the pitfalls in goal setting. 

If you have tips to share with others about making changes in your life – please get in touch.

The links to the earlier posts in this series are below.

Wendy Mason is a Life and Career Coach.  She helps people have the confidence they need to be successful at work and to change career while maintaining a good work/life balance. You can email her at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com

Related articles
  • Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 3 Be Clear About What Is Troubling You
  • Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 1 Admit A Change is Needed

  • Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 2 Be Clear About The Change You Wa

Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 3 Be Clear About What Is Troubling You

Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 3 Be Clear About What Is Troubling You

In the last post in this series  I discussed the need to be quite clear about what you need to change. I said you needed to be as specific and detailed as you could in the way you defined the change.  Starting with a clear and detailed description has a huge impact on how successful your change might be.  And I hope you have now created your description.

Now, you need to start thinking about emotions. No significant change is made without some impact on our emotions.  Understanding what they are and knowing how to manage the impact can be key to success.

Troublesome emotions like anxiety, depression, guilt, shame, anger, hurt, jealousy and envy can occur at different times in our lives.  They can be associated with lots of different kinds of events. But sometimes they occur when most people would think there should be nothing to worry about.  And they can be very difficult to deal with.

You can find one theme and one emotion recurs time and again.  It doesn’t actually stop you doing something but it can make it more difficult to do and less satisfying.

Teasing out exactly what the emotion is, is the first step in understanding the thoughts and beliefs behind it.  It can be a way to help you gain control of the emotion and make sure things turn out more positively for you in the future.

What do you feel, when you think about the change you have to make? Exactly what emotion is being stirred in you?

Be very honest with yourself. If you need support from a coach in sorting out the emotions that stop you making positive changes, get in touch, my phone number is below.

The next post in this series will be about what aspect of the change is triggering the emotion and why?

If you have tips to share with others about making changes in your life – please get in touch.

The links to the earlier posts in this series are below.

Wendy Mason is a Life and Career Coach.  She helps people have the confidence they need to be successful at work and to change career while maintaining a good work/life balance. You can email her at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com

  • Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 2 Be Clear About The Change You Want!

  • Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 1 Admit A Change is Needed

 

Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 2 Be Clear About The Change You Want!

A scattering of "brilliant" cut diam...

In the last post in this series  I discussed the need to face reality,  admit that a change is needed and then take responsibility for action.  Now you need to be quite clear about what you need to change.

You need to be as specific and detailed as you can in the way you define the change.  Starting with a clear and detailed description has a huge impact on how successful the change might be.  If you don’t really know what you want, you can still find yourself  very disappointed.

Define the change – tips!

Here are some tips for defining the problem you are trying to solve in making your change

  1. Start with what you know now! Write down as much as possible about the thing you want to change, why you want to make a change and how you plan to make it.
  2. Consider what other information you might need. What gaps are there in your knowledge about the change you want to make.  Do you understand completely how you are going to make the change and what the full effects might be?  For example, will other people be effected?  Do you need their support in making the change and are you likely to get it? How much time and money will it cost to do it and do you have those resources available?  Does making this change mean you will need to make others – what will they be?
  3. Collect the information you need.  This could include both facts and the opinions of others about the change you plan.  What has been their experience in making a similar change – what has worked for them and what has not?  Try to gather as much information as you can.

Now you are ready to define the change you want to make.

If you have gone through the steps above, you are now ready to set down in detail what your change is and how you want to make it.  Write it down and make it as clear, colorful and detailed as you can.

The next post in this series is going to cover handling emotions when making changes in our lives. No significant change is made without some impact on our emotions and knowing how to manage that impact can be key to success.

I would love to hear your experiences in making changes in your life

Working with a coach can help you to change successfully – email me at the address below for information on how I can help you.

Wendy Mason is a Life and Career Coach.  She helps people have the confidence they need to be successful at work and to change career while maintaining a good work/life balance. You can email her at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com

 

  • Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 1 Admit A Change is Needed(wisewolftalking.com)

  • Career Development – Dealing With a New Boss(wisewolftalking.com)

  • Job Search – Saying Thank You After The Interview Is A Must(wisewolftalking.com)