Making Changes – What Is Troubling You?

Making Changes – What Is Troubling You?

Making Changes – part 3 of the series. Be Clear About Your Emotions!

What Is Troubling You? In the last post in this series  I discussed the need to be quite clear about what you need to change. I said you needed to be as specific and detailed as you could in the way you defined the change.  Starting with a clear and detailed description has a huge impact on the success of your change.


Next you need to think about how you really feel about the change. No significant change is made without some impact on our emotions.  Understanding what those emotions are and knowing how to manage their impact can be key to success.

Troublesome emotions

Troublesome emotions like anxiety, depression, guilt, shame, anger, hurt, jealousy and envy can occur at any time in our lives.  They might be associated with lots of different events. Sometimes they occur when most people may think there should be nothing to worry about.  But they worry you. And they can be very difficult to deal with.

Perhaps one theme and one emotion recurs time and again.  It hasn’t stopped you doing something but it has made it more difficult to do and less satisfying.

Teasing out exactly what the emotion could be is the first step in understanding the thoughts and beliefs behind it.  It can help you gain control of the emotion and make sure things turn out more positively in future.

What Is Troubling You? What do you really feel?

What do you feel, when you think about the change you have to make? Exactly what emotion is being stirred within you?

Now is the time to take some time for reflection. Try not to judge yourself for the emotion you feel. Be very honest with yourself.  Sometimes support from someone you trust like a coach can be helpful in working out what is troubling you.

The next post in this series will be about what aspect of the change is triggering the emotion and why?

If you have tips to share with others about making changes in your life – please get in touch.

Working with a coach can help you to change successfully – email me at the address below for information on how I can help you.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

Making Changes – Defining Change

Making Changes – Defining Change

Making Changes – part 2 of the series. Be Clear About The Change You Want!Defining change

Defining Change – Making Changes is series of posts about how to make positive changes in your personal or professional life that really work . So, I hope it helps you. Perhaps, you have comments, or would like further help? If so, my email address is at the bottom of the article.

In the last post in this series  I discussed the need to face reality,  admit that a change is needed and take responsibility for action.  Now is the time to be quite clear about what you need to change.

Be as specific and detailed as you can in the way you define the change. Starting with a clear and detailed description is important. If you don’t really know what you want, you can find yourself very disappointed after you made the change.

Defining change – tips!

Here are some tips to help you and define change and be clear about the problem you are trying to solve.

  1. Start with what you know now! Write down as much as possible about the thing you want to change, why you want to make a change and how you plan to make it.
  2. Consider what other information you might need. What gaps are there in your knowledge about the change you want to make. Do you understand completely how you are going to make the change and what the full effects might be?  For example, will other people be effected?  Do you need their support in making the change and are you likely to get it? How much time and money will it cost to do it and do you have those resources available?  Does making this change mean you will need to make others – what will they be?
  3. Collect the information you need.  This could include both facts and the opinions of others about the change you plan.  Don’t be afraid to ask for help. What has been their experience in making a similar change – what has worked for them and what has not?  Try to gather as much information as you can.

Now you are ready to define the change you want to make.

If you have gone through the steps above, you are ready to set down in detail what your change is and how you want to make it.  Write it down and make it as clear, colorful and detailed as you can.

The next post in this series is going to cover handling emotions when making changes in our lives. No significant change is made without some impact on our emotions and knowing how to manage that impact can be key to success.

I would love to hear your experiences in making changes in your life

Working with a coach can help you to change successfully – email me at the address below for information on how I can help you.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

The earlier post in this series

Making Changes – First, Admit A Change is Needed

Making Changes – Admit A Change is Needed

Making Changes – part 1 of the series. First, admit you need a change.Making Changes

Making Changes is series of posts about how to make positive changes in your personal or professional life that really work . So, I hope it helps you. Perhaps, you have comments, or would like further help? If so, my email address is at the bottom of the article.

Change happens

Making changes – yes, change is inevitable. And, you can’t avoid it, but sometimes we do our best to try!  At the end of the day, though, we all get caught up in it.  If you look back at your own life, and your career, you will know that this is true.

Some change is positive and some negative. But change is inevitable. So how do you make the most of it for you, your family and your career?

Facing reality

The secret is to recognize and truly acknowledge when a change is needed. Often it is hardest to admit to yourself when that change needs to be made within you.  Start to watch  and listen to the world around you and how those about you are responding. How do they respond to you? How have things changed? If they have changed, how are you going to respond? The world is changing constantly. So make scanning your horizons a regular part of your routine.

At home and at work

At home make sure you take time to really listen to those about you including close friends. It is all too easy to get into a busy routine that leaves no time to really talk to others outside of work. So, when you ask questions about how they are feeling, be ready to listen fully to an honest answer. And, give them time and space to fully express themselves while you take time to work out how best to respond.  Staying tuned-in is an important part of maintaining healthy relationships. If a relationship isn’t healthy, be ready to take the steps necessary to put things right

At work, ask your boss for feedback about your performance if it isn’t volunteered. Begin to see how others are working now. Listen to what your boss and your colleagues are saying about the future. Read the professional and trade journals for your sector and take part in your professional organization. Keep in touch on the internet with others in your market place through organisations like LinkedIn.

Making changes – admit you need a change.

Before you make a change, you need to truly acknowledge and accept you need one. Sometimes, it will be about something within yourself or the way you act.  Are you doing all you can to keep your relationships healthy?Are you fully meeting the needs of your job as it is now,  It is all too easy to assume everything has stayed the same. The reality is that probably it hasn’t. But of  course many of the changes may be for the better. How best to respond is really up to you.

Admitting you have a weakness is painful.  It is far more comfortable to blame your partner, the boss, your colleagues or your friends. It is easier to make excuses and rationalize the situation, than admit to things as they are really and begin making changes.

Making Changes – taking the first steps

Facing reality,  admitting there is a problem and taking responsibility for action set up the conditions needed for a successful change.  They are your first steps in making changes.

The next post in this series is about being clear about the change required. You can find it at this link

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

 

Taking A Career Break: Quotes and Resources

Taking a Career Break

Taking A Career Break: Quotes and Resources

Taking a career break! Lots of us think and may be dream about the idea of taking some time out from the daily grind. Here are some quotes on the experience. Plus I’ve included below details of two books to  help you on your way. And now the quotes…

  1.  It is energizing and liberating to turn down a road you have not traveled before. To reach toward what you cannot yet touch brings new passion and strength to your life. Ralph Marston
  2. Disconnect with your work self on a sabbatical, and you’ll reconnect with who you really are.  Corbett Barr
  3. It’s a time to immerse yourself in a different environment, try new things, reassess your priorities, and look at your life from a different perspectiveMarelisa Fabrega
  4. Give yourself the priceless gifts of new experiences, new skills, new knowledge and the confidence of knowing how quickly you can grow. Expand your horizons, again and again, and discover that every limit is there to be transcended.  Ralph Marston
  5. Getting away from it all might be the only way you can really reset or change course. If you continue around the day-to-day, making significant changes is tough. Taking a few months off will give you the space you need to figure things out. Corbett Barr
  6. Taking a sabbatical is the first step towards discovering whether or not I can take the leap of faith and do something fully on my own.  Do anything for a while, and it becomes increasingly harder to cut the cord. Sam Dogen
  7. Of Fortune’s best 100 companies to work for in America, 21 of them have paid-for, formal sabbatical programs. It’s a competitive advantage with regard to recruiting talent. Jaye Smith
  8. Almost everybody got back to some form of better eating and exercise, and they keep that up. And they say, “I didn’t realize what stress I was under. Now I can go back for my next five years with some balance” Rita Foley
  9. My sabbatical didn’t really recharge my batteries as I hoped it would.  Instead, the sabbatical helped realize my preference for freedom over a steady paycheck at this point in my life.  I’ve experienced what life could be like if I worked for myself and I must say that I’m extremely excited about the prospects. Sam Dogen
  10. Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed in the things that you didn’t do than in the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Mark Twain

Books on Taking A Career Break

Escape 101: The Four Secrets to Taking a Sabbatical or Career Break Without Losing Your Money or Your Mind by Dan Clements and Tara Gignac  

“What’s your dream escape? Relaxing on a palm-studded beach? A year off to write your novel? Missionary work with the needy? Exploring ancient ruins or saving the rainforest?

Whether you’re an adventurer, a poet, a volunteer or you just need a break, Escape 101 provides you with a step-by-step system to take as much time as you need from your job, career or business, without losing ground.”

A Gap Year for Grown Ups by Susan Griffith

“A guide for grown ups wanting to take the trip of a lifetime, containing information on specialist schemes and opportunities for professionals and mature travellers. Covers everything from what to pack to paying the mortgage when away, as well as advice from adult gappers who have been there and done it.”

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

September; Time for a Fresh Start

September; Time for a Fresh Start

Wendy Smith; Career Coach and author of The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book – order on Amazon

September; Time for a Fresh Start – I find the beginning of September is a great time to take stock, look over what has happened so far in both calendar and financial years, and commit to a fresh start.

Here we are at the beginning of the academic term, when most organizations go back up to full power having got over the holiday break period.

This is a great time to get out those objectives you signed up to a while ago and see whether they are still relevant. How about writing some new ones?

It is also a great time to review your continuing profession development plan or your personal development plan. If you don’t have either yet, now is the time to set them up. There is still time to sign up for many part-time and evening courses at further education colleges. How about setting up a reading list of books to read between now and the end of the calendar year?

If you looking for work or thinking about a career change, now is the time to get organized and commit to the work you will need to do. Your networking contacts are likely to around now with some slots still vacant in their diaries.

If you have looked for work for a while now, perhaps it is time to take stock and see if there is something you should consider doing differently. Look at our group posts over the last few months – is there something useful to you?

If you are thinking about coaching, and we coaches really can add value to your personal and career development, I would love to talk to you.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

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Personal Development Mindset: Having One Is Important

Personal Development Mindset

What is a personal development mindset?

Having a personal development mindset means that you take responsibility for understanding yourself as an individual and for identifying and developing your

own strengths and talents. It means you take control and become responsible for your own life and what you make of it. You begin to manage your own success and happiness. But you can receive support from others in developing the mindset and in helping you to develop yourself.

Personal development includes understanding your values and living in accordance with them. This in turn helps to strengthen your self-image and self-esteem. Then, you begin to be able to see your own potential and you can work towards fulfilling it, in your both your work and in your home life.

Personal development enables you to;

  • Expect to succeed in your own terms,
  • Take risks that are right for you and set challenging goals,
  • Keep working patiently until you reach your goal.

Having a personal development mindset means you are;

  • Optimistic about the future even in hard times
  • Self-confident and believe in your own abilities
  • A self-starter who takes action – there can be no success without action
  • Open to new ideas wherever they come from
  • Someone who values yourself and your special contribution
  • Abundant in your thinking – it is all out there waiting for you
  • Someone who knows how to influence others for the good of all
  • Patient – you know worthwhile things are worth waiting for
  • A student – you continue learning throughout your life
  • Prepared to question yourself and respond to your own self-review

It sounds aspirational doesn’t it? But it is something worth working towards and, if you wish we can work together on its development!

Wendy Smith is a career, life and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can book a discussion with Wendy about your coaching needs and your personal development at this link

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

What is personal development?

What is personal development?

What is personal development? It is a way that you can develop all aspects of yourself;sometimes alone, What is personal development?sometimes with support from others.

Personal development can help you identity and develop your talents and potential. It can also help you find your existing options and find new opportunities.

You can improve your career opportunities, enhance the quality of your life and give substance to your dreams and aspirations.

Personal development includes;

  • understanding yourself as an individual
  • building your self-image and self-esteem
  • developing strengths or talents
  • improving your opportunities in the job market – your career
  • identifying or improving your potential
  • enhancing your quality of lifeand relationships
  • improving health and social abilities
  • fulfilling aspirations and dreams
  • developing and carrying out personal development plans

Personal development enables you to;

  • Expect to succeed
  • Take risks and set challenging goals
  • Keep trying, if at first you don’t succeed
  • Manage emotions and fears when the going gets rough

Working with a coach really can make your personal development truly meaningful! Get in touch at the email address below.
Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

Authenticity, Advantages and Awareness

Authenticity, Advantages and Awareness

Authenticity, advantages and awareness – to do well in managing your career, and in job search, it helps if you keep in mind the three “As”; authenticity, advantages and awareness.

In any job search or work situation you are more likely to succeed if you can be authentic, understand and use the advantages you bring to a situation and know how to make others aware of those advantages.

Authenticity means knowing and showing who you are and your values. It depends on knowing what you want to achieve in life and to what you are committed. Spend time to be clear about
what you care about most and accept the implications of putting that at the centre of what you do and how you behave. Authenticity at a job interview means that your answers ring true and you are much more likely to form a constructive relationship with panel members.

Understanding what you are good at, your advantages, allows you to contribute fully

Understanding what you are good at, your advantages, allows you to contribute fully in whatever you are doing. Hone your skills. Learn to be good enough at what is essential but be proud to excel at those things you do well. Accept that others are good at different things. When you are confident in your own abilities, you can accept what they have to offer. If you are job searching, be clear about the real advantages you would bring to any new job opportunity. Know how you will contribute to the team.

Look for opportunities

Look for opportunities to let the people who matter know what you have to give. Their awareness means you should be given the chance to use your gifts. How sad it would be to have them but not be able to use them. If you are job searching, think about getting your name out there by showing expertise through writing articles, speaking at meetings of your professional association or, perhaps, doing some voluntary work.

Working with a coach really can help your job search and your career. Get in touch at the Facing a mid-career dilemmaemail address below – I offer a free half hour trial session by phone or Skype.
Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

When life is boring

When life is boring

How to deal with life and work’s boring bits!

Every life contains a quotient of the mundane and boring. We all have to do things, from filling in tax forms to submitting travel expenses, which do not interest us. They have to be done but it is hard to think of them as anything beyond a chore. There is lots of advice around to help us do them efficiently of course. We know they have to be done but it is hard to find them satisfying beyond finishing them.

When I was small an aunt who lived with us was given the dubious task of teaching me to play the piano.  She herself was a talented pianist and I still have vivid memories of Beethoven vibrating up through the floorboards as she practiced each day. Sadly my commitment to practice was less impressive and she found me totally frustrating. But she taught me a lesson I’ve never forgotten – do the hard or boring stuff first, and then give yourself a reward.

Pick your rewards carefully. Make them cheap and cheerful. For example, I love trawling through Amazon for obscure eBooks which are usually free or available for pennies. I shall probably not read them. But the time spent looking for them for me is like looking for treasure and there is a real feeling of triumph when something special is found.  Wasting away a few minutes doing that is a great reward for doing a little business housekeeping.

At work, of course, for most of us there may not be an opportunity for that kind of reward. But we will have some tasks at work that we really enjoy doing. Plan your day so that you get the boring tasks completed early and then follow-up with something you enjoy. If you can, try to do something you really like just before you finish work in the evening. It means you are much more likely to leave work on a high.

As for me, well, I wish now I had paid more attention to the practice! I regret not learning more from my talented and very independent aunt but her story is for another day.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book your free 30 minute, no obligation, trial coaching session with Wendy Smith now at this Link 

The Value of Friendships at Work

The Value of Friendships at Work

Personal and Career Development: The Value of Friendships at Work

Advice from Wendy Smith; Career Coach and author of The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book – order on Amazon

The Value of Friendships at Work – yesterday I had lunch with friends that I made at work more than 30 years ago. Meeting them led me to meditate on how important friendship can be in supporting you through the difficult times in your career.

I met those particular friends when they were fresh from university: now, they are on the verge of retirement.

We were part of a cohort of young Civil Servants setting out on an intense, month-long,  course in Economics. I don’t know how much of it we retained for use in our later careers but the friendship has certainly stood the test of the years.

I don’t know what bound us together so strongly as a group beyond our variety – we a had nice mix of art, science and scepticism, in youth. The scepticism has mellowed with the years like our competitiveness.

I know that their friendship, and that of another former colleague, has been important to me in a life which has had more discontinuities than most.

Certainly, friendship has been one of the things that has sustained me through difficult patches at work.

The ability to talk in confidence to someone you trust, who understands what you do, can help you get through hard times in one piece. A true friend’s on-going respect for you, and what you stand for, can help keep your self-esteem and confidence in tact through a storm.

 

Remember working with a career coach can really help job search. Get in touch at the Facing a mid-career dilemmaemail address below – I offer a free half hour trial session by phone or Skype. Find my books on my Amazon page at this link; http://ow.ly/BRSAL

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book your free 30 minute, no obligation, trial coaching session with Wendy Smith now at this Link