Networking and your job search!

Networking and your job search!

Job Search Part 3: What networking can do for your job search!

Networking – this is the third and last post in a short series on Job Search. In the first at this link  we said that you have a decision to make! The clearer you are about the kind of work you want, the more likely you are to be successful.

In the second post at this link,  I set out some options for you about where to look for work

Recruitment agencies
On-Line Job Sites
Contacting employers directly
LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter
Local newspapers and bulletin boards
Graduate and Intern schemes
Word of mouth – Networking
I said that I thought networking was the most effective way to look for work; so that is what we are going to tackle to-day.

Most jobs, particularly in the private sector, are never advertised at all. You find out about those jobs through talking to people – networking.

Letting people you know, and people they can introduce you to, know what you have to offer, really does bring new opportunities. These contacts can offer advice from own their experiences of job search. They can tell you about the sector they work in and they can introduce you to others, so that your network expands.

But networking is more than just asking for help! You need to make it a two-way conversation. In order to receive, you should be ready to give.

So what have you got to share in this conversation? Well, you can be an attentive audience! You can listen with real interest, attention and respect to what they have to say. Plus you can share your own knowledge. You can talk about your own sector and you can share your own contacts. Sometimes people are really grateful for an opportunity to talk about what is happening to them at work. Play your part and offer support when it is needed.

Make it an ongoing and mutual conversation. You can become ambassadors for each other and connect each other with new possibilities.

You can network beyond your existing circle. For example at a meeting of your professional organization. If you don’t already belong to the professional organization for your sector, now is the time to join. It can be expensive but it is a really good investment. Your professional organization can help you keep you up to date with developments in your profession and in your market sector, It can give you early warning about possible changes legislation. Knowing about new trends helps you to keep up personal development even though you are out of work. Most importantly when you are out of work it provides a way to stay linked-in to the world of work.

You can network, as well, at events like job fairs which are intended to bring employers together with potential new employees. And if you are thinking of making a career change into starting your own business, lots of business networking events are held for you each week.

Networking is having a conversation

Remember, the keys to success on any networking occasion are establishing a relationship and having a conversation. It is about showing you are someone they want, but it is not about selling yourself in a way that embarrasses you or the people you talk to. Have a short description of who you are and what you do crafted before you arrive. But have a care with the traditional elevator pitch about what you have to offer at work. Have one ready but use it with care and discretion. Too many people at networking events treat them as opportunity to sell themselves rather than to make contacts.

Try to remember something particular about each of the new contact that you make. Find a quiet place to make a couple of notes after your conversation. Then follow up after the event in a way that shows you can add value. For example, if someone has a particular interest find a book or a newspaper article that you can send to them.

To network wel,l you need to understand the networking process and have the confidence to take an active part in it. If you would like one to one advice on networking email me. I am happy to offer readers of this blog a free half hour coaching session by phone or Skype

I know you can get that job you have hoped for and I would like to help you. My contact details are below

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

 

Networking Tips to Help Your Job Search

Networking Tips to Help Your Job Search

Networking – if you are a new job seeker it might surprise you to learn that 60% networkingof jobs are never advertised.  That means that most vacancies are filled by word of mouth. There are filled through networking.

Why are so few vacancies advertised?

Advertising costs a lot of money.  And then it takes a lot of time to sort through application forms and CVs and even more resource to interview candidates. All this can be avoided by promoting from within the organisation or by employing people who are known to them. Some organisations actively encourage their staff to refer friends with suitable skills and most are happy to receive introductions to, or approaches from, good people.

How do I begin?

Most people are anxious about networking if they’ve never done it before. Taking an organised approach and working to your plan can help you feel more confident.

Steps to networking!

  1. Make a list of the people you know – including the sector they work in and who they might know.
  2. Look out for contacts and networks that relate to your own sector – check out industry conferences, events and forums.
  3. Exploit the possibilities of social networking. Join business networking sites such as LinkedIn. Look for relevant groups and organisations on social networking sites including Facebook. You could consider establishing your own networking group on LinkedIn or Facebook.
  4. Plan your approach. Have a clear idea of who you want to talk to or make contact with at events and online. Think about why you are interested in the organisation and why you’re approaching them.
  5. Do your homework. When approaching an individual or organisation try to research what they do. LinkedIn and Facebook are great tools for researching people. Get to understand their culture and the language of the sector they work in.
  6. Focus on what you can offer. Before setting up a networking meeting, think about what you can do for them. Could you suggest a contact that might help their business or offer to help out with a busy project they are involved in? Do you have specialist advice to offer?
  7. Tailor your communication. Don’t send out the same version of your speculative application letter or CV to all organisations. Make sure they are tailored to the organisation and show how your skills are relevant.
  8. Keep records.  Keep an excel spreadsheet or a notebook listing contacts,to whom you’ve spoken or written.  And include their contact details and their position as well as how you are going to follow up. This record can be invaluable if your contacts get in touch at a later date.
  9. Be yourself. The most important parts of networking are to be yourself and to treat other people with courtesy and respect. You don’t have to have overwhelming confidence – just remember other people at networking events may be feeling just like you. Show a real interest in other people and start a conversation, and then follow up; you will become a good net-worker and it will pay dividends.
  10. Remember, networking is 60% about giving (your time, interest and energy) and only 40% about getting

If you need support in developing the confidence to network please get in touch.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

How to network to find a job!

How to network to find a job!

How to network – job search networking is all about making connections with people. The people you want to contact are those who can either let you know about potential job openings or connect you with others who can tell you.

Networking means talking to everyone you know. This includes family, friends, neighbours, acquaintances, previous employers and colleagues, people you play sport with, local business people, the family solicitor or accountant—everyone. It doesn’t matter if you don’t know very many people. The people you do know might in turn know other people who have heard about a job opening.

Job search networking can be done at different levels. It can be a matter of having casual conversations with people you meet. Or you can make it an active and strategic campaign to contact people for ideas, suggestions and information.

Don’t be afraid to ask for help. People are usually happy to help if they can. You have nothing to lose by phoning or meeting with your contacts. If you don’t make the connection, you won’t be able to tell if the person has good information or knows about an upcoming job. If you do speak with them, you might just land that job, or hear about another that suits you better.

At worst you might feel a bit uncomfortable. But, being prepared will make the discussions easier.

How to Prepare For Job Search Networking

Make a list of all the people you know.

They don’t need to be friends, or even acquaintances; you just need to have enough of a common link with them to initiate a conversation. If you can pick up the phone and call them, for any reason, they are potential networking contacts.

Prepare what you are going to say

You don’t want to just ring people up and say, ‘I work in HR. Do you know of any jobs going?’ Before you phone anyone, note down the specific details of what you’re looking for and exactly the kind of help you think they might be able to give you. For example, say:
‘I’m looking for a role in training and development within the public sector or a not-for-profit organisation. [Government department] or [organisation name] would be the kind of place I’d like to work in. Would you know of any places, maybe smaller and more local, that might be looking for trainers?’

Contact the people on your list in a systematic way

Set yourself a goal—maybe you’re happy to spend all afternoon on the phone to people, and cross twenty off your list. Or maybe you just want to work through the list steadily, making three calls a day. If you find yourself losing enthusiasm, being less conversational and speaking more mechanically, it might be time to take a break.

Ask them for job leads

To make it easy for people to help you, ask them if they have any tips, leads or suggestions. Ask them if they know of any vacancies at all for a person with your skills. If they don’t, ask them to keep you in mind in case anything comes up. Most importantly, ask them if they can suggest anyone else you contact. Do they know someone else who might know about the kinds of jobs that you’re after? Do they know anyone who works for this or that company that you’re interested in joining? If they can refer you to others, contact those other people and ask them the same questions.

Follow up contacts

Often people will tell you, ‘I’ll ask around and see what I can find out for you.’ Sometimes they do ask around; sometimes they forget almost immediately, or a crisis happens at work and they haven’t the time. If you don’t hear from them within a week or so, call them back to see if they’ve managed to find anything out.
Sometimes it seems as if no one will do anything for you or ask around on your behalf. It can be frustrating, but you should stay very polite and pleasant in your dealings with your contacts. After all, you’re asking them for a favour.

Follow up leads

After your initial networking efforts and research, you’ll probably have a long list of new people to try and make connections with. A phone call may be enough, or you might want to arrange a meeting with them to introduce yourself and ask them more specific questions about their company or industry.

Networking wisdom

• Whenever you meet someone new, exchange business cards with them (or at least get one from your new contact, so you can send them your details).
• Show your appreciation for the help you receive by sending a thank-you note, or by telling your contact how their information helped you, even if it only led indirectly to a job prospect.
• Think laterally about where to find network contacts. You can find people to add to your network almost anywhere.
• Get involved in a civic, social, religious or sporting organisation that interests you. As you meet new people in the organisation, they can become new network contacts.
• Join a professional organisation related to your field. The meetings or related events are good opportunities for you to network with people in your field.
• Think about online networking, in forums and in chat rooms.
• Record and organise all your network contacts—for example, on a spreadsheet or index cards. Write down what you found out from them, and any follow-up you should do. This will help you organise your time and monitor your progress.

Keep networking

Even after you’ve found a job, keep networking. Networking isn’t just for getting a job; it can help you do your job better, and it’s a way of being part of your community and society.

Life is full of surprises. You never know when you might need your network contacts’ help in another job search.

Social networking

Social networking sites, such as LinkedIn and Twitter, are becoming increasingly important tools for both job seekers and employers. Learn how to use them – if you would like some help I can recommend a first rate social networking trainer

With thanks to Australia’s Myfuture website

Wendy Mason is the The Career Coach – helping you to find fresh perspectives on your Job Search and Career. She helps you work towards your goals and aspirations, in a way that fits in with both work and home life. Email her at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com,  find her on Skype at wendymason14, or call +44 (0) 2081239146 (02081239146 for UK callers) or +1 262 317 9016 if you are in the US.

A free trial/consultation allows you to try phone coaching from the comfort of your own home and without risk. Don’t forget to ask about the Summer Special Offer 

  • Job Search and Career Development:How to Perfect Your Elevator Pitch
  • Career Development; How To Ask For an Informational Interview
  • Job Search:How to Negotiate Salary During a Job Offer
  • Job Search – Minding the Brand – Not Your Holiday Photo Please
  • Career Development – “Worst Case Scenario” – How To Handle Getting Fired

Job Search Networking

Job Search Networking

Job Search Networking – Asking Friends For Help

Job Search Networking – there are lots of people who find networking difficult. They find it embarrassing.

But you do it all the time. You may, or may not do it well. And you may do it for all kinds of different motives – for example, to raise money for a local charity. But you do it just the same. Networking is just getting to know people and then offering them something (be it dinner or a sales product) and sometimes asking them for something.

Good networking is usually about reciprocity. So, what about networking when you are looking for a job? What is reciprocal about that?

Well, networking isn’t a short-term thing. The relationships you develop need to be built for the long-term – this is not about short-term exploitation; it is about investing something of yourself in a relationship that can stand the tests of time. At some point in any relationship, sometimes quite early on, there will usually be something one party asks of the other.

What makes a good networker?

Becoming a good listener and knowing how to encourage other people to talk are important skills, if you want to be a good networker. And both nee you to take, and show, a real interest in the other person. Listen hard and listen quietly – hear the words and the music in terms of their tone and the body language that accompanies their words. Most of us enjoy being listened to fully – it reinforces our sense of ourselves.

Learn to make the conversation flow – from what you have heard, link to a new question – learn about the how and the why as well as the what. Find out more about them. Then let them find out about you – be open and ready to show them a real person.

In networking, set up the relationship before you ask for anything. And in job search be clear about what you are asking. Of course, you can let them know that you are looking but do more than that. Find out from your contact about their organization and the sector they work in. What are the latest developments? And be honest about your request for help. Tell them a little about you and what you could bring with you – what is the value you might add if they do pass your name on.

Make sure they have your clear contact details and follow-up with a note of thanks. If you can give something back – perhaps you have a contact that might be useful for them – or you might find an article in a magazine or know of book they might like. Because you are asking for something doesn’t mean you have nothing to give back.  Just remember what I said above – networking is all about reciprocity.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

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Overcome Your Fear of Networking in a Few Simple Steps

Overcome Your Fear of Networking in a Few Simple Steps

Fear of Networking! I understand that networking can be intimidating. But if you really want that job, you’ll have to work for it.

Florence Fung

Florence has served more than 6 years of experience as an audit senior manager in a Big 4 accounting firm. She began her career in Vancouver, British Columbia but spent most of her career in Atlanta, Georgia. As a Chartered Accountant, she has been actively involved in campus recruiting and interviewing potential candidates of all levels. Florence enjoys helping others as much as she can but don’t expect any sugar coating from her. You’ll only get the straight up blunt truth. Reach her at flo@thejobmouse.com.

Overcome Your Fear of Networking

“Posting your resume on a job site? Checking job posting sites everyday? Submitting your resume to a company website? If this all sounds familiar to you, I have some bad news for you. You’re suffering from “hide behind laptop” disease. The remedy? Get off your butt and start meeting people in person. After all, there is a real world beyond your laptop.

In today’s job market, networking is a necessity. I understand that networking can be intimidating. But if you really want that job, you’ll have to work for it….Read the rest at

Overcome Your Fear of Networking in a Few Simple Steps

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

Job Search and the Internet – Using Social Media to Network

My last post promised that today I would deal with your online presence.

Those who have worked in particularly conservative parts of the public sector may find even the thought of having an online presence uncomfortable.  But in reality, you probably already have one.

If you put your name and your previous employer into Google or Yahoo, you might be surprised by what emerges.

I put Wendy Mason,Wisewolf (the name of my company) into Google five minutes ago and came up with 4,240 references in 0.17seconds.  But then I do work with social media (Blogs etc) so I’d have a problem if it wasn’t like that.  Your own presence should depend upon what you have done and what you aspire to! But it is much better to manage it yourself than just to let it happen.

First of all, I’m assuming you know the basics of using the internet.  In job search it is great for looking up potential employers and for research before job interviews. You can also sign up with various recruitment agencies on line and upoad your CV.  But I’m most interested in how you are going to use social media (LinkedIn, FacebookTwitter and the rest).  These are not just for the young, they are efficient and effective ways to stay in touch with a whole lot of people and to find new opportunities.

I going to stick to writing about LikedIn, Facebook and Twitter because they are the sites I believe most useful for Job Search for the UK candidates who make up most of my audience.  They are also the social media sties with which I have the greatest familiarity.

LinkedIn – this is the most significant professional networking site.  It has existed since 2002 and has over a 100 million users worldwide. It is a directory of individuals and companies and is used mainly for finding and keeping in contact with business contacts, former colleagues etc, job searching, hiring and company research.

You can join for free then you complete your profile. In doing so you can put in as much or as little information as you wish and you can decide how much of that information is public. For job search it helps if you complete your profile as fully as possible and make it  public.  But, of ocurse, with all social media, you should have regard to the dangers of identity theft and think very carefully before publishing a personal phone number, your birthday etc.

If you wish you can upgrade your account which brings extra facilities like the ability to send more messages.

What to include in your LinkedIn Profile when you are unemployed can be an issue. But you can make clear that you are “open to opportunities.”  This is important because LinkedIn is routinely searched by recruitment companies who are looking for good candidates to invite to apply for particular vacancies.

Once a member, you can join various groups – there are a number related to the public sector but please look beyond them. You can join and then take part in discussions, ask questions and provide answers – it all raises your profile and your credibility.

Twitter is a social networking and micro-blogging service.  You write messages in 140 characters just like writing a text message on your phone. In fact many people send posts to Twitter from their phones.  You can write about anything and people and companies use it in a variety of ways, including to job search.

You join for free.  Users post updates on Twitter that are displayed on the user’s profile page and delivered to other users who have signed up to receive them – followers.

I love Twitter (you can follow me as @WWiswolf).  When you are working at home alone on your job search it can provide that moment of light conversation and information that you found during breaks at the tea-point.

But Twitter is now also a serious tool in job-search because employers and recruiters post job openings.  Many job seekers now use Twitter to help their job search.

Somewhere on Twitter you will find like minds but you can also find lots of advice on Twitter about job search itself. Try following Alison Doyle

Facebook can be used for job search but it needs to be used with care. Facebook is most commonly used for staying in touch with family and close friends. You need to set your privacy options very carefully if you don’t want everything you post on Facebook to be seen by a prospective employer. Chance remarks on Facebook have already cost people job offers and have caused employees to be fired.  You can find some good advice on using Facebook for Job Search again from Alison Doyle at this link

Using social media in your job search needs to be part of you overall networking strategy.  Remember that it is likely that everything you post on the net could found by potential employers if you don’t make it private, so keep the messages and your profile consistent.  But I don’t think any serious job seeker today should ignore the help that social media can provide.

If you have any questions or need any help, please get in touch – I do provide a telephone coaching service in social media if it might be useful to you.  In any case I will be very interested to hear about your experiences on line!

Next week, I’m going to start working with you on your CV

Related articles

  • Job Searching on Social Networks (jobcontax.wordpress.com)
  • Job Seekers: Don’t Make These 3 Mistakes on LinkedIn(millerlittlejohnmedia.com)
  • Bashful Britons Shy Of Using LinkedIn And Facebook To Look For Work (blazingminds.co.uk)
  • Why you need to network! (leavingthepublicsector.blogspot.com)

 Wendy Mason is used to working with people moving out of the Public Sector! She is a performance, programme, contract management and change specialist. She works as a consultant, business coach and blogger.  Adept at problem solving, she is a great person to bring in when that one thing you thought was straightforward turns out not to be! If you have a problem talk to Wendy – she can help you – email her at wendymason@leavingthepublicsector.net or ring ++44(0)7867681439

You can find her business blog at www.wisewolftallking.com

>Why you need to network!

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Description: Social Networking Source: own wor...  In my last post, I mentioned that Dave, like others leaving the public sector, doesn’t think networking will be the right thing for him. So today, I am going to write about the value of professional networking.

Everyone has a network of friends and contacts already.  Networks are not about exploiting people, they are about building and maintaining relationships.

In professional networking you are gathering information that may help you in your work, not just your job search.  You never know when you will need these relationships or when your contacts may need you and the information you have in return! Just like personal networks, professional networks are about reciprocal arrangements.  And personal networks and professional networks blend into each other in terms of people offering mutual support.
But let us deal with the issue of networking and job search! 

Most people leaving the UK public sector come from an environment where the rules require all new posts to be advertised.  While it is true that people find ways round the rules, that is expectation.  It is part of the culture.  

People can get very upset if they find a juicy public sector role has been filled without being advertised at least internally across the organization.  But those same people can get very upset if they a key role has been advertised outside the organization without looking first for someone inside the organization. That again is part of the corporate culture.  

In the world outside things are often different. 
As Ian Machan said here recently probably between 30% – 80% of all jobs, never get advertised – the iceberg factor.  If you spend your time just on the advertised vacancies, you have less chance of getting a post because there is far more competition for those roles. 

If you spend at least some time on the hidden, less competitive vacancies, you are raising your chances of success.  

So, it is wise to take a balanced approach, between applying for advertised posts and exploring the “hidden market.
Jobs that don’t get advertised usually get filled in one of three ways:
  • Recruitment Consultants search their files of registered applicants who are suitable candidates
  • Direct approach through networks of personal contacts and head-hunters (who again often rely on their own wide networks of contacts).
  • Previous applicantsunsolicited CVs received or near-miss candidates from previous advertising campaigns.

Small-to-medium-sized organizations (SMEs) may never advertise their jobs nationally – or at all. With far smaller recruitment budgets, these organisations prefer local or specialist publications, recruitment agencies, unsolicited and direct applications or people found through contacts.
In some larger organizations, again not all vacancies are advertised!  This is so particularly in competitive areas such as public relations, journalism or consultancy work. Employers expect applicants to take the initiative.
Some organizations prefer to hire someone we
ll known to contacts as being capable of doing a good job against the risk of an unknown “best” candidate. 

The degree of formality around filling even quite senior posts can vary widely.  This may come as something of a shock to former public sector employees.
Networking is critical in accessing this hidden market. 

There is a huge amount to be gained from developing your contacts in terms of gathering industry knowledge and hearing about these never-advertised positions.
A professional network is not just a nice-to-have; it’s a must-have source of new work, support, advice, ideas and consolation. So, strengthen relationships with people you already know and put some energy into meeting new people.
My next post will deal with your online presence, LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and the rest—they’re not just for teenagers, they are efficient and effective ways to stay in touch with a whole lot of people and to find new opportunities.

In the mean time if you need advice about networking please get in touch – my contact details are below or you can use the contact form here. 

>The Latest Letter from Dave and we have a dilemma – to network or not to networK?

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Dave has returned from a holiday in Spain.  Reading the advice on Leaving the Public Sector since he has been away, he feels he is doing OK.  He’s not angry about losing his job but he is a bit depressed and daunted about the future. 


June, his wife, however, thinks differently.  They never used to argue but since he left the Civil Service she says he is always been getting angry about something!    He is certainly fit and healthy – he doesn’t think he needs to worry about that.  


He thinks the stuff about networking is interesting but not for him.  He has friends “but not contacts as such and anyway he doesn’t want to humiliate himself by begging for help and advice”. Here is an extract from his latest letter


 “I saw that you also suggested that people should start to think about networking but I don’t think that would be helpful for me.   My work colleagues were all civil servants and even if they could help me, I wouldn’t want to ask my friends to get me a new job.  I think people should be employed on merit not because of who they know.”


How would you advise Dave?


You can read the rest of his letter at this link.


 Related articles




Wendy Mason is used to working with people moving out of the Public Sector! She is a performance, programme, contract management and change specialist. She works as a consultant, business coach and blogger.  Adept at problem solving, she is a great person to bring in when that one thing you thought was straightforward turns out not to be! If you have a problem talk to Wendy – she can help you – email her at wendymason@leavingthepublicsector.net or ring ++44(0)7867681439
You can find her business blog at www.wisewolftalking.com  

>Networking Your Way to a Good Future – Part 2 – A Pilot List for Reluctant Networkers

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et ve de gust un cafè? 



As I mentioned in Part 1, when you start networking, you will find that most people are generous with both their time and their advice.  If they trust you, they will be prepared to introduce you to others who can help and to give you good advice.

But starting to network can be daunting. So we are going to make a pilot list of people who are both useful and approachable. These will be people you can practice on!

You should have a long list of contacts if you followed the suggestions in Part 1.  Now is the time to go through it and score your candidates out five for
  1.  Accessibility – you can contact them easily and they are located within meeting distance
  2. What they might be able to do for you! I’m afraid you will have to be a bit ruthless here – remember your future is at stake
  3. Their “user friendliness” – how approachable they are.

The scores on the doors

Now you can rank them. 

Put those with a score of  2 or less in categories 1 and 2 above to one side in pile D – these are put on hold for now!

Of those who remain, put those with a score of 2 or less in category 3 in pile C.  However useful they are, it will help to build up some confidence before you approach them.  Unless of course you are an Ace Networker who loves a challenge!

Now add up the scores of those you have left and rank them.  

Within your top ten, do you have five who score 5 in category 3?.  If so put them in pile A.  

If you can’t find five contacts who score 5 then add in the top scorers who scored four in category 3.  

You are looking for five useful people who are also friendly to start your networking activity – Pile A – Your Pilot List.  

The rest go into Pile B.

Make sure you have names, email addresses and telephone numbers for Pile A and Pile B.

I hope the ranking made sense – if not get in touch and I’ll give further guidance.

The message
Now before you make your first phone call or send your first email you n

eed to decide what to say.


People just love being asked for advice. Personally I believe this is best done face to face over coffee, lunch or a drink rather than on the phone.  

So I would start with an email or a phone call to ask for a little of their time.

When you have asked how they are, and reminded them if necessary about how you met, you need an explanation for your call or email! It is a good idea to keep things fairly brief and positive as you can at this stage!  

You can mention being caught up in the cuts if it is appropriate but emphasise that you are focussing on the future rather than the past.  You are seeking their advice and perhaps to find out more about their sector or their organisation and the possibilities. 

You could ask if it is OK to send your CV before the meeting saying that you would welcome thier comments upon it.

When you meet, emphasize your flexibility and openness to opportunity

The project

Use your card index or Microsoft Outlook Contacts to keep a record of your success – who you have rung and what happened.  

You can use the category markers and follow up flags in Microsoft Outlook Contacts to keep track.  

Treat this like a project with a beginning middle and end.

Work through your pilot list.  Keep a record of their comments and remember to send a note of thanks after your meeting.  

Say that you would like to keep in touch and ask them to keep you in mind if they hear of anything interesting.

When you have worked your way through your A List, you should be ready to start on List B.

The next post will deal with networking events and “cold calling” people you do not know. 

But in the mean time I would love to hear how you get on.  And of course please get in touch if you have questions.




Wendy Mason is used to working with people moving out of the Public Sector! She is a performance, programme, contract management and change specialist. She works as a consultant, business coach and blogger.  Adept at problem solving, she is a great person to bring in when that one thing you thought was straightforward turns out not to be! If you have a problem talk to Wendy – she can help you – email her at wendymason@leavingthepublicsector.net or ring ++44(0)7867681439


>Networking Your Way to a Good Future – Part 1 the Mighty List

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Making Friends - Marketing CartoonImage by HubSpot via Flickr

Many experts believe that many, if not the majority, of jobs don’t get advertised.  

This is certainly true for the private sector, less so in the public sector.  But the likelihood of a job not being advertised seems to increase with the level of the job. 

So the more people who know you, or at least know of you, the more likely you are to be offered a role. 

There is a very good reason to develop and make the most of your contact network.

But unfortunately networking doesn’t always get a good press.  It continues to be associated with selling of the cruder kind.  This is a pity!

Networking can be useful and very enjoyable for all concerned!

If you go into it with an honest approach, determined to offer something of value (you are prepared to develop the relationship and provide help when you can) it is certainly not exploitation.

You will be surprised how willing and pleased people will be to help.

For networking to work well you need to develop a broad list of contacts.  This can include people you’ve met in your private and social as well as your work life.

Don’t forget people you’ve met through social networks over the internet but I’ll deal separately with social  networking in another post. 

Unless you want to invest in specialist software, the easiest way to start your list is with a pen and a large sheet of paper.  Then think in terms of a series of circles; the inner circle being your closest friends and family.  You can draw this if it helps.  Or you could develop a spider diagram, if that appeals to you more.  You then segment each circle (branch) into slices for family, work, hobbies and social life.

Work from inside out – who do you know and who might they know?

Think about people you know now and people you used to know.

You can edit out in the second step – the first step is get as many people down on paper as possible.


In the next step we are going to think about how you are going to use the list. We are going to work out a plan and for that you are going to need a card file or a simple computer data base. I use Microsoft Outlook Contacts.

When you start networking, you will find that might most people are generous with both their time and their advice.  If they trust you, they will be prepared to introduce you to others who can help!
In the mean time if you have any questions please get in touch.  If you have some good tips on how to make the most of your network please share them here.