Motivation for Managers and Entrepreneurs – Quotes

motivation for managers

Motivation for Managers and Entrepreneurs – Quotes

Here are some quotes to inspire motivation for managers and entrepreneurs.

  • My mentor said, “Let’s go do it” not “You go do it.” How powerful when someone says, “Lets!” Jim Rohn
  • The most powerful and predictable people-builders are praise and encouragement. Brian Tracy
  • Reinforce what you want to see repeated. What gets rewarded gets done. Brian Tracy
  • We cannot build our own future without helping others to build theirs. Bill Clinton
  • Managing is like holding a dove in your hand. Squeeze too hard and you kill it, not hard enough and it flies away. Tommy Lasorda 
  • Encourage your people to be committed to a project rather than just be involved in it. Richard Pratt
  • A manager is an assistant to their people. Thomas J Watson
  • The one word that makes a good manager – decisiveness Lee Iacocca
  • Develop your people. Focus on their strengths. Then make high demands based on a person’s strengths. Finally, periodically view their performance Peter Drucker
  • Success in management is when those you manage succeed, and the organization you work for succeeds. Unknown
  • People become really quite remarkable when they start thinking that they can do things. When they believe in themselves they have the first secret of success. Norman Vincent Peale

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

Is Dopamine Your Key To Feeling Motivated?

In your brain the neurotransmitter dopamine works to ensure you get out of bed in a morning. It stimulates and supports your motivation. Dopamine contributes to feeling  thrills, pleasure, drive and concentration. Dopamine plays a big part in all kinds of reward motivated behaviour and feeling motivated.

People with low dopamine can lack a zest for life and sometimes they even begin to dopamine keeps you feeling motivatedshow signs of an addictive personality. They may become hooked on dopamine stimulating drugs like cocaine. Sometimes people with low dopamine just keep searching for new thrills; for example, taking too many risks or indulging in multiple love affairs.

Dopamine deficiency can be genetic. It may be created by viruses or drug abuse. Deficiency can lead to fatigue and depression.

Exercises, such as running, stimulate dopamine but again, it is important not to become addicted to the good feelings.

Dopamine is all about feeling motivated and reward motivation

You can stimulate your dopamine release by marking small goals with rewards and self praise. Move gradually towards bigger goals by rewarding yourself for each small step. Remember to stimulate the dopamine in other members of your team by praising them for reaching their goals. Being generous with praise is good for you and others.

Eating foods like eggs and spinach help to produce dopamine, as does drinking coffee. But, again, avoid the addictive effect – drinking too much caffeine will simply stimulate the release of adrenaline and cortisol. You want to feel motivated to achieve your goals, not stressed out.

A new book helps you understand the roles of your “happy chemicals” including dopamine and others like serotonin,  oxytocin, and endorphin. “Habits of a Happy Brain” shows you how to retrain your brain to turn on the chemicals that make you happy.  You can find out more at the link below.

Wendy Smith is a life coach and executive coach with depth of experience in career coaching, business coaching and personal development. She helps clients find a new career direction, start-up new businesses as well as dealing with the life problems and personal development. You can contact Wendy at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Management – Dan Pink: The puzzle of motivation

Management – Dan Pink: The puzzle of motivation

Career analyst Dan Pink examines the puzzle of motivation, starting with a fact that social scientists know but most managers don’t: Traditional rewards aren’t always as effective as we think. Listen for illuminating stories — and maybe, a way forward.

Bidding adieu to his last “real job” as Al Gore’s speechwriter, Dan Pink went freelance to spark a right-brain revolution in the career marketplace

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

Tuesday Quotes for Leaders and Managers – Management and Motivation

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Monday Quotes for Leaders and Managers – Management and Motivation

  • My mentor said, “Let’s go do it” not “You go do it.” How powerful when someone says, “Lets!” Jim Rohn
  • The most powerful and predictable people-builders are praise and encouragement. Brian Tracy
  • Reinforce what you want to see repeated. What gets rewarded gets done. Brian Tracy
  • We cannot build our own future without helping others to build theirs. Bill Clinton
  • Managing is like holding a dove in your hand. Squeeze too hard and you kill it, not hard enough and it flies away. Tommy Lasorda 
  • Encourage your people to be committed to a project rather than just be involved in it. Richard Pratt
  • A manager is an assistant to their people. Thomas J Watson
  • The one word that makes a good manager – decisiveness Lee Iacocca
  • Develop your people. Focus on their strengths. Then make high demands based on a person’s strengths. Finally, periodically view their performance Peter Drucker
  • Success in management is when those you manage succeed, and the organization you work for succeeds. Unknown
  • People become really quite remarkable when they start thinking that they can do things. When they believe in themselves they have the first secret of success. Norman Vincent Peale

Wendy Mason is a Life and Career Coach.  She helps people have theconfidence they need to be successful at work and to change career while maintaining a good work/life balance. You can email her at wendymason @wisewolfcoaching.com

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A Winning Team Makes S.M.A.R.T. Goals

 

S. M.A.R.T. goals! Today we have a guest post from the University of Notre Dame, in partnership with University Alliance. The University of Notre Dame offers higher education opportunities through a variety of online executive certificates, including leadership and management, and negotiations. You can find out more about the courses they offer at this link http://www.notredameonline.com/

S.M.A.R.T. goals

A Winning Team Makes S.M.A.R.T. Goals

When applying S.M.A.R.T goals – Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant, Time-bound – to project management and organisational team building, leaders should take a deeper look at the application of motivation in the creation of effective work groups. Similar to an established sports team that plays as a cohesive unit achieving goals as a group – that is simply unattainable alone – a strong leader can use motivation to propel the momentum of team goals forward. Keep these tips in mind when building a team of excellence:

1. Motivation is a planned activity

Just as a well orchestrated series of athletic exercises builds the stamina and cohesion of a sports team, a thoughtful goal-setting program sets the pace for individuals and work groups. Each individual should identify clear goals that are precisely aligned to his or her work description. From there, managers take on the role of coach and mentor by providing ongoing feedback. It is important to understand if, and when, “time outs” to make goal adjustment are necessary. Motivation is an ongoing person-to-person activity. On an individual level, the specific needs of an employee should be satisfied, while maintaining focus on the team’s overall objectives.

2. Motivation requires versatility

Any certified and seasoned business process manager can vouch that excellent communication skills are vital for long term success. Effective leaders understand the nuances of each team member’s role and skill set, and how those skills and perspectives fit into the larger picture. Goal-setting, monitoring, and evaluation should reflect ongoing motivation that is specific and relevant to an individual’s position within the company. Every person in the organisation needs to feel that his or her contribution is important and valued. Keeping track of progress in the form of reports can help others on the team and in the company celebrate achievements. This also highlights problem areas that require redirection or strategy improvement.

3. Motivation builds collective success, not necessarily a finite “Win”

Effective motivation within the S.M.A.R.T. goals framework recognises that achieving benchmarks such as increased efficiency, profitability, and marketability is about the process, not the final destination. All effective goals dovetail into more extensive ambitions that involve sustained stamina and a dedication to the values-driven commitment of every level of contribution. Some goals will be tailored, traded for other goals, and some will be so long-reaching that exceptional ongoing motivation is vital to ensure forward momentum. An effective leader needs to understand and apply a versatile skill set when coordinating with other leaders and when energising employees. When goals cannot be achieved, the learning process involved can be just as significant as the initial goal. “SMART” leaders make the most of teachable moments.

4. Coaches need motivation too

Seasoned team leaders will tell you that one of the secrets to professional longevity is taking time to feed yourself professionally. Every great coach takes time out to recharge. You will be more effective over the long haul if you schedule time to regularly do what you need to do to replenish your motivational reserves. Your team demands your time, energy, and attention. You owe it to yourself and your team to plan – schedule time in a way that is conducive to longevity. Staggered reviews, budgeted down time, and invigorating networking events are all notable ways to sustain motivational skills.

In combination with implementing specific goals that are attainable and are easily tracked, motivating employees requires skill, versatility, and stamina. While your daily coaching life may not be as exciting as travelling the circuit with a professional sports team, carefully examining the many facets of motivation when applying S.M.A.R.T. goals to your team is imperative. Motivation skills that are up to par ensure that your team finds its own special brand of excellence and plays the game with pride, dedication, and commitment for many years to come.

The University of Notre Dame, in partnership with University Alliance, has provided this article. The University of Notre Dame offers higher education opportunities through a variety of online executive certificates, including leadership and management, and negotiations. To find out additional information about the courses offered please visit http://www.notredameonline.com/

Achieving that high performance – excellence and why I don’t play the piano!

Aristotle, the philosopher, had it exactly right 2000 years ago: “We are what we repeatedly do.”  Experience shows that by relying on highly specific practices, we can dramatically improve skills ranging from empathy, to focus, to creativity, to summoning positive emotions, to deeply relaxing.

Anders Ericsson is one of the world’s leading researchers into high performance. For more than two decades, Ericsson has been making the case that it’s not inherited talent which determines how good we become at something, but rather how hard we’re willing to work — something he calls “deliberate practice That notion can be wonderfully empowering. It shows we can be in control of at least part of our own fate.   But it is also daunting. One of Ericsson’s central findings is that practice is not only the most important ingredient  in success, but also the most difficult and probably the least enjoyable. Excellence requires dedication and focus.  But it worries me on other fronts!  Do I want to be excellent at one thing or good enough at a range of tasks that help me lead a rounded and satisfying life?  I suppose I want to be more than good at something so that I can make a real contribution to the world! Call that egotistical but there it is!  But I want to be pretty good at a range of things and I want to be broad enough to take to take the helicopter view over the world that makes for a good leader!

Anyway if you want to be pretty good at something and still keep your wider perspective here are some pointers!

  1. Lead with what you love. Passion is an incredible motivator. It fuels focus, resilience, and perseverance. Choose as your key skill something you really enjoy and love doing
  2. Do the hardest part first. Learning anything is part grind and grunt! We all move instinctively toward pleasure and away from pain. Most great performers, Ericsson and others have found, delay gratification and take on the difficult work of practice first, before they do anything else. Dedicate the time in the day when you have most energy to the part you like least.  Do it well and get it out of the way!
  3. Practice, practice,practice without interruption for short periods of no longer than 90 minutes and then take a break. Ninety minutes appears to be the maximum amount of time that we can bring the highest level of focus to any given activity. But don’t spend all day! The evidence is equally strong that great performers practice no more than 4 ½ hours a day. And you need the rest of the time for wider pursuits and other interests
  4. Seek feedback, but not too much. The simpler and more precise the feedback, the more equipped you are to make adjustments. Too much feedback, too often, overwhelms and erodes confidence.  Find people you trust, who like you, to give honest feedback in the right doses!
  5. Take regular breaks. Just like in the gym, relaxing after intense effort provides an opportunity to rejuvenate. But it also allows you to metabolize and embed learning. It’s also during rest that the right hemisphere becomes more dominant, so you could so something creative during your break and find a whole new world of interests.
  6. Build you practice into a ritual . Researcher Roy Baumeister has found, that very few of us of us have huge amounts of will and resolutiont. The best way to insure you’ll take on difficult tasks is to build rituals — specific, inviolable times at which you do them, so that over time you do them without having to squander energy thinking about them.
  7. Review, review, review Be prepared to take a step back sometimes and review your progress.  How does the skill you are acquiring fit in with your rounded life?  How is it going to contribute your future success and happiness?  Be prepared to change your plans in the light of your learning.

As for that piano, my aunt was a pianist at concert performance level!  When I was a small child she attempted to teach me to play.  She became incredibly frustrated because I would find every excuse not to practice.  I never did learn to play!  But her lesson that the hard work gets done first has stayed with me throughout life!  I regret not being able to play but I value my creative childhood!  I spent my time exploring and that is a valuable skill that has stayed with me throughout life!

SO THE PROJECT AND THE CONTRACT HAS COME TO AN END! 10 WAYS TO FIND A NEW ROLE

All good programmes and projects come to an end! And so, of course, do the bad ones,  but with less happy results.    Good or bad, in due course, you will want to look for a new role!  It is imperative to pick yourself up and dust yourself off  and start all over again – or at least start looking for a new project.   Here are some tips to help you deal with the situation and to help you find an amazing new assignment.

1. Assess the Situation –  How did the project run and how did it end?  What can you learn and take with you into the future. Take a look at the big picture. Look for the good things and new possibilities that this experience might bring you and what new contacts have you made? Keep a positive attitude.   Whatever happened remember the old adage…….. it’s time to turn lemons into lemonade.

2. Consider your Finances –  Start with the practical – take stock of your finances !   This will help you to evaluate just how selective you can be in searching for a new project and help you to plan a budget for these leaner financial times.  If you see that your saving habits have not been what they should be, consider stepping up your savings once you move on to the next assignment – it is unlikely the financial climate will suddenly have improved.

3. Update Your Resume or CV – Most of us do not stay on top of keeping our resumes current, so now is the time to add new skills and experience information from your most recent work. You are likely be surprised at all of the skills and knowledge you will have acquired!  Have you worked in a new sector or run things in a new way?   If necessary,  hire a professional resume writer to help  you sell yourself more effectively  – there are plenty of people out there willing to help and it could give you the edge you need!

4. Now is the time to invest in training –  If time and funding permits, take advantage of your downtime between roles to update your skills – techniques are constantly changing in the world of change management,  project and programme management.  Awareness of new techniques and confidence in discussing them could give you the edge with a potential client, as well as helping you to deliver better!

5. Let The World Know You Are Available!  – network , network, network, with all your professional acquaintances and agencies as well as  friends and  family who just may know of the perfect position for you.  Now is the time to make use of your professional memberships – go to events and involve yourself.  Remember, often companies have project and programme roles that may not be heavily advertised and all it takes is a word from the inside to be considered. Make sure you talk to everyone you know and let them know that you are actively seeking a new role.  If you have had a recent success then talk about it!

6. Treat Assignment Hunting As A Job – Sitting around waiting for your dream programme to fall into your lap doesn’t work!  Spend what is your usual working day doing something that will help you in your new assignment!  Whether you are training, reading sector magazines and books in your field ,  searching the Internet for possible roles or managing your contacts, keep your hours filled with productive and focussed tasks.

7. Gather Positive References – If you left your role with a positive success then asking for a reference is easy – but please do it!  If things were less than perfect or at least good, you may not want to use your former client when looking for new assignment. Compile a list of people who can vouch for you as a project or programme manager and let them know that they may be called upon as a reference.  .

8. Make Your Move – If you have been considering a move to a new location, this might be the perfect opportunity to relocate. As you will be searching for a new role anyway, you won’t have the same strings attached that you would if you were in a role. Changing cities or even countries can open up a whole new world of opportunities to you. But be sure it still leaves you with good options in terms of the ability to use your contacts

9. Don’t Give Up – No matter how hard the search might seem right now, keep looking and don’t be discouraged. There is certainly a project out there for you but it may take a bit of hunting down!  This opportunity will be what you make it, so be positive and productive

10. Good Luck – make your own – follow 1 to 9 above!  And I would love to hear how you get on!