Leadership at all levels

Leadership at all levels

Creating Leadership At All Levels

Leadership at all levels – leadership is about creating positive change in a group leadership at all levelsto achieve a long-term objective. It means having a vision, setting goals and knowing how to move  people towards them. The key skill is knowing how to best use your resources, mainly  your people and their talents, to get you to where you need to be.

As the leader, you should be able to show why you should have the authority to be in the leadership role. You have to understand the organization and the world in which it operates. That way you can win the confidence and trust of the people you will lead. If you are new, you need the best brief you can get. Then ask questions that will show people you are really interested in them and what they are trying to do.

If you are leading a team, you will need to develop and motivate individuals and groups. That means helping people find meaning and purpose in what they are doing. They need to see it as worthwhile. And, as a leader, you have a responsibility to create more leaders throughout your organization. You can do that by setting a positive example. Allow people to learn and develop on the job, as well as encouraging them to be proactive. Let them know they really can influence the way the organization achieves success.

If you are the leader, you will need resilience and be able to overcome obstacles that others find daunting. You should know how to find new solutions and inspire others to do the same thing. Make sure people throughout the organization know that their ideas are welcomed and will be rewarded. Help them to have confidence in you, and themselves, when times are hard.

Be prepared to recognise and reward positive leadership

Be prepared to recognise and reward positive leadership wherever you find it. Let some of your own power be passed on to those around you. Just make sure they share your vision. And that you have a way to know whether they are staying on the right track. Accept, that letting go of power means taking risks and be ready to step when things go wrong. That is part of leadership too! Support your emerging leaders and what you will win is their loyalty. They in turn will support you.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

Performance Management

Performance Management

Performance Management

Managing People – Is Your Performance Review Really Necessary?

Performance management – lots of organisations carry out “performance appraisals.” Most people consider them a “good thing!” And there is lots of information around to help you do them well.

But there is more to encouraging good performance than carrying out the annual performance review. Some people question whether carrying out annual performance reviews actually impacts on the quality of performance.

Let us think a little about the person being assessed. What do they usually think about when a review is due.  Here’s what it likely to be.

What your employee thinks about before their performance management review

  • How is this review going to affect my bonus/performance related pay?
  • How am I being assessed and is it fair?
  • Is my contribution really going to be recognised and acknowledged?
  • How does this review affect my chance of promotion?
  • How well am I doing compared to my peers?

But if you think about it.  These questions don’t reflect why, as a manager, you carry out a performance review.

What you are concerned about is;

  • How will you help the person understand what you think of their performance?
  • What evidence is needed to support your view?
  • If they are not meeting the standard, what advice should you give?
  • What action should follow on from the review?

You are looking to do an assessment that helps your member of staff become more committed to your objectives. How do they become more motivated, accountable, reliable, creative, dedicated, and, yes, happy in the job?

Given the difference in perspectives, holding one annual performance review doesn’t really seem to meet your purpose or theirs. Surely what you need instead is a relationship and structures that support an ongoing dialogue?

No you don’t want spend every day discussing performance.

There is much to be said, though, for commenting very quickly on exceptions in performance – be they good or bad. Giving praise is as important as giving criticism.

Having a performance stock take once a month works for many! Certainly, having a more formal review quarterly, where the question of the bonus isn’t part of the mix, has worked for me. And then, at the end of the year, it is an agreed summary of those quarterly reviews that feeds into the financial reward system.

Developing an effective relationship, and  having an open discussion about the quality of performance is works. It is much more likely to help you and your staff member achieve your goals, both corporate and personal.

Remember, performance management is the process of creating a work environment in which people are enabled to perform to the best of their abilities. Performance management is a whole work system that begins when a job is defined. It ends when an employee leaves your organization.

With a performance management system that works (and a well developed relationship), it becomes much easier to discuss career development. You can consider together opportunities for career progression. Threats to good performance can be seen off before they become real issues. Everyone benefits.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

Advance Your Career – Three Great Tips

Advance Your Career – Three Great Tips 

Do you want to advance your career? Are you looking out for a career shift? Want to explore a whole new career path? If your answer is yes, then you’re probably overwhelmed with the idea of starting from scratch. But don’t worry, it’s not as complicated as you think it is. In order to make this new career change a work for you, you not only have to define your career success, but also know how to make yourself attractive to potential employers. In the following article we look into a few tips on how you can advance your career the right way…

#1: Know How You Want Your New Career to Shape

Being clear about what you want out of your professional work life will help you immensely in shaping your career the right way. Right from focusing on what skills you want to use or develop, to people you will interact/engage with as customers and colleagues, you should be clear about everything.

Regardless of what future career your choose to go with, you have to have a sharp and clear understanding of what you want from it. The idea here is to make your new career more interesting, inviting and comfortable for you. This may require you to move a little bit out of your comfort zone, but it will be worth it in the end. The career switch will be more satisfying and will help you focus in the right direction.

#2: Get Out there and Network Effectively

There are no hard and fast rules when it comes to finding work in a tough economy, but there’s one thing that you shouldn’t ignore and that is the power of networking. Finding a good job is not just about who you know, but also who knows you.

There are suitable jobs out there that fit your criteria, but you should be willing to roll up your sleeves and put in the efforts needed to find them. In other words, you have to be ready to take a chance by networking with new people to find a better and more satisfying new career. Don’t limit your networking to dinners or events – leverage social networking websites such as Facebook and LinkedIn to connect with new people.

#3: Go Back to School and Get an Advanced Degree

When it comes to securing the job of your choice, one of the key factors that you should focus on is differentiating yourself from the other candidates. Going back to school and earning an advanced degree or getting an industry specific certification will help you do just that. If you’ve got enough work experience and you want to accelerate your position in the business world, you could get an MBA degree from Sanford Brown. This way you’re accrediting yourself and networking at the same time.

Getting a degree not only bumps your credentials and helps you advance your career, it also helps in bridging any gaps in employment on your CV or resume. This makes you a better and much more attractive candidate in the eyes of the recruiter, increasing your chances of getting recommended to the hiring manager.

Career Development: 3 Great Tips to Successfully Advance Your Career

Career Development: 3 Great Tips to Successfully Advance Your Career

Are you looking out for a career shift? Want to explore a whole new career path? If your answer is yes, then you’re probably overwhelmed with the idea of starting from scratch. But don’t worry, it’s not as complicated as you think it is. In order to make this new career change a work for you, you not only have to define your career success, but also know how to make yourself attractive to potential employers. In the following article we look into a few tips on how you can advance your career the right way…

#1: Know How You Want Your New Career to Shape

Being clear about what you want out of your professional work life will help you immensely in shaping your career the right way. Right from focusing on what skills you want to use or develop, to people you will interact/engage with as customers and colleagues, you should be clear about everything.

Regardless of what future career your choose to go with, you have to have a sharp and clear understanding of what you want from it. The idea here is to make your new career more interesting, inviting and comfortable for you. This may require you to move a little bit out of your comfort zone, but it will be worth it in the end. The career switch will be more satisfying and will help you focus in the right direction.

#2: Get Out there and Network Effectively

There are no hard and fast rules when it comes to finding work in a tough economy, but there’s one thing that you shouldn’t ignore and that is the power of networking. Finding a good job is not just about who you know, but also who knows you.

There are suitable jobs out there that fit your criteria, but you should be willing to roll up your sleeves and put in the efforts needed to find them. In other words, you have to be ready to take a chance by networking with new people to find a better and more satisfying new career. Don’t limit your networking to dinners or events – leverage social networking websites such as Facebook and LinkedIn to connect with new people.

#3: Go Back to School and Get an Advanced Degree

When it comes to securing the job of your choice, one of the key factors that you should focus on is differentiating yourself from the other candidates. Going back to school and earning an advanced degree or getting an industry specific certification will help you do just that. If you’ve got enough work experience and you want to accelerate your position in the business world, you could get an MBA degree from Sanford Brown. This way you’re accrediting yourself and networking at the same time.

Getting a degree not only bumps your credentials, it also helps in bridging any gaps in employment on your CV or resume. This makes you a better and much more attractive candidate in the eyes of the recruiter, increasing your chances of getting recommended to the hiring manager.

Workplace Drug Testing and Drug Misuse at Work

Workplace Drug Testing and Drug Misuse at Work

Workplace drug testing – you may be interested to read this advice from the UK Health and Safety Executive

It is an offence under the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 for any person knowingly to permit the production, supply or use of controlled substances on their premises except in specified circumstances (e.g. when they have been prescribed by a doctor).

You should also be aware of duties under the Road Traffic Act 1988 and the Transport and Works Act 1992. Drivers of road vehicles must not be under the influence of drugs while driving, attempting to drive or when they are in charge of a vehicle. Certain rail, tram and other guided transport system workers must not be unfit through drugs while working on the system. The operator of such a system must exercise all due diligence to avoid those workers being unfit.

Key messages

Drug and other substance (e.g. solvent) misuse is everyone’s concern. In the context of work, not only does it damage the misuser’s health, but it can cost employers through absenteeism and reduced productivity. It may also increase the risk of accidents. Employers should adopt a substance misuse policy, in consultation with their staff. This policy should aim to support affected employees rather than punish them, though your policy must say that possession or dealing in drugs at work will be reported immediately to the Police. If an employee admits to being a drug user, your policy should seek to help them rather than lead simply to dismissing them.

Some employers have decided to adopt drug screening as part of their drug policy. If you think you want to do the same, think very carefully about what you want screening to do, and what you will do with the information it generates. It is also important to consider the drug testing process itself including the type of testing, how the sample is collected and the security of the sample from contamination. Advice has been prepared by the European Workplace Drug Testing Society link to external website (EWDTS) to ensure the drug testing process is reliable and accurate.

Drug screening by itself will never be the complete answer to problems caused by drug misuse.

You can find out more at these links:

 

Wendy Mason is the The Career Coach – helping you to find fresh perspectives on your Job Search and Career. She helps you work towards your goals and aspirations, in a way that fits in with both work and home life. Email her at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com,  find her on Skype at wendymason14, or call +44 (0) 2081239146 (02081239146 for UK callers) or +1 262 317 9016 if you are in the US.

 

A free trial/consultation allows you to try phone coaching from the comfort of your own home and without risk. Don’t forget to ask about the Summer Special Offer 

 

Management: Drug misuse at work

Management: Drug misuse at work

Drug misuse at work – you may be interested to read this advice from the UK Health and Safety Executive

It is an offence under the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 for any person knowingly to permit the production, supply or use of controlled substances on their premises except in specified circumstances (e.g. when they have been prescribed by a doctor).

You should also be aware of duties under the Road Traffic Act 1988 and the Transport and Works Act 1992. Drivers of road vehicles must not be under the influence of drugs while driving, attempting to drive or when they are in charge of a vehicle. Certain rail, tram and other guided transport system workers must not be unfit through drugs while working on the system. The operator of such a system must exercise all due diligence to avoid those workers being unfit.

Key messages

Drug and other substance (e.g. solvent) misuse is everyone’s concern. In the context of work, not only does it damage the misuser’s health, but it can cost employers through absenteeism and reduced productivity. It may also increase the risk of accidents. Employers should adopt a substance misuse policy, in consultation with their staff. This policy should aim to support affected employees rather than punish them, though your policy must say that possession or dealing in drugs at work will be reported immediately to the Police. If an employee admits to being a drug user, your policy should seek to help them rather than lead simply to dismissing them.

Some employers have decided to adopt drug screening as part of their drug policy. If you think you want to do the same, think very carefully about what you want screening to do, and what you will do with the information it generates. It is also important to consider the drug testing process itself including the type of testing, how the sample is collected and the security of the sample from contamination. Advice has been prepared by the European Workplace Drug Testing Society link to external website (EWDTS) to ensure the drug testing process is reliable and accurate.

Drug screening by itself will never be the complete answer to problems caused by drug misuse.

You can find out more at these links:

 

Wendy  is the The Career Coach – helping you to find fresh perspectives on your Job Search and Career. She helps you work towards your goals and aspirations, in a way that fits in with both work and home life. Email her at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com,  find her on Skype at wendymason14, or call +44 (0) 2081239146 (02081239146 for UK callers) or +1 262 317 9016 if you are in the US.

 

A free trial/consultation allows you to try phone coaching from the comfort of your own home and without risk. Don’t forget to ask about the Summer Special Offer 

 

What Kind Of Leader Are You?

What Kind Of Leader Are You?

What kind of leader are you? So, if you had a choice, what kind of person would you want to follow? It is a good question to ask yourself if you are leader in any capacity – from a hobby group, a small work team to a major corporation.

Well, there are some obvious characteristics, aren’t there? For example, we would all want a leader who acted with integrity. Integrity is the very bedrock of trust and we all hope that we can trust the person who is showing us the way ahead.  As for me, I want to follow someone I can believe when they tell me it is safe to take a risk. I’m not going to walk across that rope bridge to a what you tell me is a bright future unless I believe that it really is strong enough to keep me out of the river. Now, sometimes of course you won’t know any more than I do – but you will certainly know how to find out as much as possible. And you’ll tell me clearly what the facts are and why I should take the risk anyway, if I should.

Then, of course, we want a leader who has a clear vision of where we are trying to go and can paint it in a way that we can see the destination too. We want someone who can paint the future in colours that lead us to have enough faith to step out with them. We need a message that gets us all turning in the same direction and marching a long together. That vision needs to be bright enough to illuminate the way.

Most of all we would like to follow a leader who wasn’t working for their own ends but for ours; a servant leader who is prepared to act with compassion. John Maxwell put it this way: “Servant-leaders never pursue a mission at the expense of their people. Rather, servant-leaders earn the loyalty and best efforts of their people by serving the interests and investing in the development of those they lead. A servant-leader wants to see others succeed.” Good leaders know that they’re only as good as the people who support them and so they invest time and energy in ensuring the well-being and success of their team.

What Kind Of Leader Are You?

So, what kind of leader are you? Are you demonstrating integrity, vision and compassion? If not, what changes do you plan to make? You will need to change something won’t you, if you are serious about your career and expect others to follow you.

If you would like some help in developing your leadership skills please get in touch. Good leaders are modest enough to know that working with a coach really can make a difference.

Wendy Mason is the The Career Coach – helping you to find fresh perspectives on your Job Search and Career. She helps you work towards your goals and aspirations, in a way that fits in with both work and home life. Email her at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com,  find her on Skype at wendymason14, or call +44 (0) 2081239146 (02081239146 for UK callers) or +1 262 317 9016 if you are in the US.

A free trial/consultation allows you to try phone coaching from the comfort of your own home and without risk. Don’t forget to ask about the Summer Special Offer 

 

 

Teamwork and Your Career – What Kind Of Leader Are You?

Teamwork and Your Career – What Kind Of Leader Are You?

So, if you had a choice, what kind of person would you want to follow? It is a good question to ask yourself if you are leader in any capacity – from a hobby group, a small work team to a major corporation.

Well, there are some obvious characteristics, aren’t there? For example, we would all want a leader who acted with integrity. Integrity is the very bedrock of trust and we all hope that we can trust the person who is showing us the way ahead.  As for me, I want to follow someone I can believe when they tell me it is safe to take a risk. I’m not going to walk across that rope bridge to a what you tell me is a bright future unless I believe that it really is strong enough to keep me out of the river. Now, sometimes of course you won’t know any more than I do – but you will certainly know how to find out as much as possible. And you’ll tell me clearly what the facts are and why I should take the risk anyway, if I should.

Then, of course, we want a leader who has a clear vision of where we are trying to go and can paint it in a way that we can see the destination too. We want someone who can paint the future in colours that lead us to have enough faith to step out with them. We need a message that gets us all turning in the same direction and marching a long together. That vision needs to be bright enough to illuminate the way.

Most of all we would like to follow a leader who wasn’t working for their own ends but for ours; a servant leader who is prepared to act with compassion. John Maxwell put it this way: “Servant-leaders never pursue a mission at the expense of their people. Rather, servant-leaders earn the loyalty and best efforts of their people by serving the interests and investing in the development of those they lead. A servant-leader wants to see others succeed.” Good leaders know that they’re only as good as the people who support them and so they invest time and energy in ensuring the well-being and success of their team.

So, what kind of leader are you? Are you demonstrating integrity, vision and compassion? If not, what changes do you plan to make? You will need to change something won’t you, if you are serious about your career and expect others to follow you.

If you would like some help in developing your leadership skills please get in touch. Good leaders are modest enough to know that working with a coach really can make a difference.

Wendy Mason is the The Career Coach – helping you to find fresh perspectives on your Job Search and Career. She helps you work towards your goals and aspirations, in a way that fits in with both work and home life. Email her at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com,  find her on Skype at wendymason14, or call +44 (0) 2081239146 (02081239146 for UK callers) or +1 262 317 9016 if you are in the US.

A free trial/consultation allows you to try phone coaching from the comfort of your own home and without risk. Don’t forget to ask about the Summer Special Offer 

 

 

Getting On With People At Work!

Getting On With People At Work!

Managing Your Career – Getting On With People At Work!

Getting on with people! One the hardest lessons we have to learn in life, is that we will meet people who don’t like us.

Sometimes this will be for reasons that we understand.  But sometimes it won’t! And, of course, sometimes we may find ourselves not liking someone and it may be very hard to know why.

How we respond depends very much on the circumstances.

If you find yourself, for example, sitting next to someone on a plane for a journey that lasts an hour, it make very little difference whether you like each other or not. But when the person you are having difficulties with is your new boss, a colleague or an employee, that does matters. It matters a lot!

First, if you are dealing with your own feelings of dislike, try to work out why you feel like that.  What is it about this person that you find difficult?  Take some time to think about the issue.  Is it how they look? Is it something they have said or done? Sometimes, we dislike those who remind us of people or experiences in our own past. Take time to reflect and then be completely honest with yourself.

If you have a sense of mistrust, then try to work out why? Is there any evidence to support how you feel?

Be very honest about your own prejudices. If the way you feel is about their race, their age or their sexual persuasion, then you have some really hard work to do. This problem is yours to resolve, not theirs.

When you have feelings of dislike, work on valuing the individual and the contribution they make.

If the issue is to do with bad memories, seek the help of a coach or counsellor.

If it is about prejudice then again seek out support from a trainer or coach if you are serious about your career. Be honest and brave enough to seek help.

If someone dislikes you, then again, see if you can work out why and try to put things right.  If the person is, for example, a new boss, then you may have to take your confidence in both hands and ask for an explanation.  Try to make sure the boss really does understand how you are contributing to the work and be prepared to share your knowledge and, on occasion, your contacts.  In other words turn yourself into an asset.

Above all keep the lines of communication open.  Never fight with the boss! At the end of the day, it really is better to move on, if you can’t find the middle ground.

If the problem is with a colleague or an employee again work hard to find out why and then find the middle ground, while being scrupulously fair. At the end of the day, with a professional approach you should be able to find a way to work together even though you may not be best buddies.

Getting on with people at work is important. You don’t owe those you work with undying affection, nor do they owe that to you.  But you do owe them a fair chance to do their work well and a fair hearing if they have a problem.  You should be able to expect the same in return.

Wendy Mason is the The Career Coach – helping you to find fresh perspectives on your Job Search and Career. She helps you work towards your goals and aspirations, in a way that fits in with both work and home life. Email her at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com,  find her on Skype at wendymason14, or call +44 (0) 2081239146 (02081239146 for UK callers) or +1 262 317 9016 if you are in the US.

A free trial/consultation allows you to try phone coaching from the comfort of your own home and without risk. Don’t forget to ask about the Summer Special Offer 

 

Managing Your Career – Getting On With People At Work!

Managing Your Career – Getting On With People At Work!

One the hardest lessons we have to learn in life, is that we will meet people who don’t like us.

Sometimes this will be for reasons that we understand.  But sometimes it won’t! And, of course, sometimes we may find ourselves not liking someone and it may be very hard to know why.

How we respond depends very much on the circumstances.

If you find yourself, for example, sitting next to someone on a plane for a journey that lasts an hour, it make very little difference whether you like each other or not. But when the person you are having difficulties with is your new boss, a colleague or an employee, that does matters. It matters a lot!

First, if you are dealing with your own feelings of dislike, try to work out why you feel like that.  What is it about this person that you find difficult?  Take some time to think about the issue.  Is it how they look? Is it something they have said or done? Sometimes, we dislike those who remind us of people or experiences in our own past. Take time to reflect and then be completely honest with yourself.

If you have a sense of mistrust, then try to work out why? Is there any evidence to support how you feel?

Be very honest about your own prejudices. If the way you feel is about their race, their age or their sexual persuasion, then you have some really hard work to do. This problem is yours to resolve, not theirs.

When you have feelings of dislike, work on valuing the individual and the contribution they make.

If the issue is to do with bad memories, seek the help of a coach or counsellor.

If it is about prejudice then again seek out support from a trainer or coach if you are serious about your career. Be honest and brave enough to seek help.

If someone dislikes you, then again, see if you can work out why and try to put things right.  If the person is, for example, a new boss, then you may have to take your confidence in both hands and ask for an explanation.  Try to make sure the boss really does understand how you are contributing to the work and be prepared to share your knowledge and, on occasion, your contacts.  In other words turn yourself into an asset.

Above all keep the lines of communication open.  Never fight with the boss! At the end of the day, it really is better to move on, if you can’t find the middle ground.

If the problem is with a colleague or an employee again work hard to find out why and then find the middle ground, while being scrupulously fair. At the end of the day, with a professional approach you should be able to find a way to work together even though you may not be best buddies.

You don’t owe those you work with undying affection, nor do they owe that to you.  But you do owe them a fair chance to do their work well and a fair hearing if they have a problem.  You should be able to expect the same in return.

Wendy Mason is the The Career Coach – helping you to find fresh perspectives on your Job Search and Career. She helps you work towards your goals and aspirations, in a way that fits in with both work and home life. Email her at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com,  find her on Skype at wendymason14, or call +44 (0) 2081239146 (02081239146 for UK callers) or +1 262 317 9016 if you are in the US.

A free trial/consultation allows you to try phone coaching from the comfort of your own home and without risk. Don’t forget to ask about the Summer Special Offer