Looking For a Job While Still Employed

Looking For a Job While Still Employed

Advice from Wendy Smith; Career Coach and author of The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book – Wendy’s books on Amazon

Looking for a Job while still Employed – is it a good idea? Well, most recruitment experts will tell you that employed candidates have a distinct advantage over unemployed candidates. Though that might be uncomfortable to read, it seems to be true. But looking for work while still employed has its own risks and it needs to be managed carefully.

The first and most obvious danger is that your existing employer will find out and regard your search as an act of disloyalty. That isn’t true for all though. There are some sectors where it is common to develop your career by moving around. Some employers know that if they cannot give you development opportunities, you will look elsewhere. They can reasonably expect, though, you will stay long enough to give them a return on any investment they have made in you in terms of training. On top of that, you will support their search for a replacement.

Looking For a Job While Still Employed – Use Discretion

If you work for an employer who is likely to oppose your move, your job search needs to be conducted with care. You need to know that those to whom you disclose it will behave with discretion. If you can, keep everything quiet until you have a firm offer of employment.

Don’t let your job search distract you from doing well in your present role. If you do lose focus, you risk losing credibility not only with your present employer but more generally; you’d be surprised how quickly word gets round. Plus, a couple of failures at work soon impacts on your confidence in the job search.

When you do find your new role, treat your present employer and your colleagues with respect before your departure. You do not know when you may meet them again and being able to rely on a good reference will be invaluable in the future.

If you need help with your job search, please get in touch. Remember I offer a trial free half hour coaching session by phone or Skype.

Other resources to help your job search

In the job market, there are always lots of useful techniques to learn or to refresh. From writing a modern CV to wooing at the interview, you’ll find lots of tips in my handy little pocket-book.

Looking For a Job While Still Employed
A concise and practical little workbook. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

A concise and practical little work book, it is for all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

Find this and my other books on my Amazon page at this link; http://ow.ly/BRSAL

Remember working with a career coach can really help both  job search and career resilience. Get in touch at the Facing a mid-career dilemmaemail address below – I offer a free half hour trial session by phone or Skype.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book your free 30 minute, no obligation, trial coaching session with Wendy Smith now at this Link 

Positive Job Search

Positive Job Search

Advice from Wendy Smith; Career Coach and author of The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book – Wendy’s books on Amazon

Positive Job Search – a positive attitude is key to successful job seeking. Finding a job can be an uncomfortable ride. And I sometimes hear pretty outrageous stories about how people are treated in the recruitment process. Finding yourself without a job, in uncertain times, remains hard.

But if you are going to be successful, you need to get past the negativity. And you need to be ready to learn. Job search has changed radically in the last 10 years. Just think for a moment about the impact of social media. And you may need to do some studying to update your professional skills. You can’t afford to be complacent about your value in today’s job market. Nor can you afford to waste energy on a negativity.

Tips for Positive Job Search

  • Acknowledge any grief and anger for what they are and seek help if necessary from a coach or counsellor to overcome them.
  • Learn to live in the present – practicing Mindfulness can help here.
  • Work on staying physically fit with a good diet, exercise and rest.
  • Approach the job market with an open mind and be ready to learn how it works now. In particular learn to use LinkedIn – it is an invaluable job search tool.
  • Work on understanding the real value you bring and improve that if you can with study.
  • Treat the recruiting employer as a customer. Accept that success comes from understanding their needs and showing how you can meet them better than anyone else. Remember it is about what they think they want, not what you think they should want.
  • Be flexible in terms of the work you are prepared to consider.
  • Network as much as you can – remember lots of very good jobs never get to into the hands of recruitment companies.

I’ve worked with a number of clients who thought they had no chance of securing another good job. Now, they are now in work and happy. If I can do anything to help you, please get in touch.

Other resources to help your job search

In the job market, there are always lots of useful techniques to learn or to refresh. From writing a modern CV to wooing at the interview, you’ll find lots of tips in my handy little pocket-book.

Stress-free Job Search
A concise and practical little workbook. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

A concise and practical little work book, it is for all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

Find this and my other books on my Amazon page at this link; http://ow.ly/BRSAL

Remember working with a career coach can really help both  job search and career resilience. Get in touch at the Facing a mid-career dilemmaemail address below – I offer a free half hour trial session by phone or Skype.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book your free 30 minute, no obligation, trial coaching session with Wendy Smith now at this Link 

Stress-free Job Search

Stress-free Job Search

Advice from Wendy Smith; Career Coach and author of The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book – order on Amazon

Stress-free Job Search – looking for work is often a very stressful experience. This is particularly so if you haven’t chose to chosen to leave your job and/or you have searched for a job for a long time. But there are ways that you can cut that stress and here is some advice.

We feel stressed when we perceive a threat. If you are unemployed and worried about the future for you, and those you love, that certainly feels threatening.

The effects of stress

When we feel threatened, the nervous system responds by releasing a flood of stress hormones. These include adrenaline and cortisol. These hormones rouse the body for emergency action. Your heart pounds faster, muscles tighten, blood pressure rises, breath quickens, and your senses become sharper. These physical changes increase your strength and stamina, speed your reaction time, and enhance your focus. And they prepare you to either fight or flee from the danger at hand. This is helpful in an emergency and it can be helpful in raising performance temporarily. But if you stay in this state for too long damage can be caused to both your body and your mind.

Long-term exposure to stress can lead to serious health problems. And chronic stress disrupts nearly every system in your body. Among other things, it can raise blood pressure or suppress you immune system making you more vulnerable to infection, as well as increasing the risk of heart attack and stroke. Long term stress can even rewire the brain, leaving you more vulnerable to anxiety and depression.

Stress-free Job Search – here’s how you can limit the stress

Accepting that you are likely to suffer a degree of stress in job search, there are the ways you can limit the amount of stress you have to suffer. Here is how you get closer to stress-free job search

First, it can be helpful to have a regular routine to your day. This should be very much modelled on the working life pattern you are used to. But make sure you leave enough time in the day for regular meals and exercise. Then you can sharpen your time management skills so that you don’t feel overwhelmed by the challenges ahead. For example, set realistic goals, set regular progress reviews and adjust your goals as needed. Make and manage a priority to do list and block out time in your diary to work on particular parts of your job search project without interruption.

Keep perspective! When your job search is stressful, it can feel as if it’s taking over your life. To maintain perspective, talk to people you trust about the challenges you’re facing. They might be able to give insights or offer suggestions for coping. Sometimes simply talking about difficulties can relieve stress.

Take care of yourself

Take a break. Even a few minutes of personal time during your day can be refreshing. Don’t be afraid to take some breaks from your job search, just as you would at work. This could be the occasional long weekend or a short holiday, if you can afford it.

Have an outlet and set aside time for activities you enjoy. These could be walking, reading, socializing or pursuing a hobby.

Make sure you take care of yourself. So, include physical activity in your daily routine, get plenty of sleep and eat a healthy diet.

Don’t be afraid to seek help if none of the above is really helping and you continue to feel overwhelmed. Please consult your doctor, counsellor or coach for advice on how to cut the levels of stress in your life before it causes you real harm.

Stress-free Job Search – over the last year, I’ve worked with a number of clients who thought they had no chance of securing a good job again. That was a very stressful experience for them. They are now in work and happy.  So, if I can do anything to help you, please get in touch.

Other resources to help your job search

In the job market, there are always lots of useful techniques to learn or to refresh. From writing a modern CV to wooing at the interview, you’ll find lots of tips in my handy little pocket-book.

Stress-free Job Search
A concise and practical little workbook. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

A concise and practical little work book, it is for all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

Find this and my other books on my Amazon page at this link; http://ow.ly/BRSAL

Remember working with a career coach can really help both  job search and career resilience. Get in touch at the Facing a mid-career dilemmaemail address below – I offer a free half hour trial session by phone or Skype.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book your free 30 minute, no obligation, trial coaching session with Wendy Smith now at this Link 

Stand Out At Interview

Stand Out At Interview

Job Search: How to Stand Out From The Crowd

Advice from Wendy Smith; Career Coach and author of The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book – order on Amazon

Stand out at interview if you want to be successful. If you want to be offered that longed-for job, these days you need to do more than simply prove you can do the work. It is likely that you will be one among several candidates who can provide evidence of that.

So what can mark you out as that special candidate – the one they want?

I’ve spent a lot of time thinking about my experience as both interviewer and interviewee. I’ve come to the conclusion it all comes down to the three Es; enthusiasm, energy and engagement.

Stand out at interview – enthusiasm

It is great if a candidate shows they really care about my vacancy. I don’t want to feel that mine is just another on the long list they have applied for. If they are interested in my job, they will have done their home work and know about my organization, who our customers are and the sector we work in. They will be able to show me why they think this is a great opportunity for them.

Energy

I want to find a sense of resilience and energy. The successful candidate is going to be someone not likely to be daunted by the challenges ahead.

Engagement

Candidates who actively engage with the interviewer and the interview process put themselves at the head of the field. By that I mean someone who walks into the room with confidence and then takes part in a real discussion. Not someone who simply pours out information in response to the questions asked. Their body language will show real interest and they will keep up good eye contact. They will have high self-esteem without arrogance.

If you can show the three Es at your next interview, you are pretty much bound to make a good impression.

Other resources to help your job search

In the job market, there are always lots of useful techniques to learn or to refresh. From writing a modern CV to wooing at the interview, you’ll find lots of tips in my handy little pocket book.

Stand Out At Interview
A concise and practical little workbook. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

A concise and practical little work book. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

Find this and my other books on my Amazon page at this link; http://ow.ly/BRSAL

Remember working with a career coach can really help career resilience. Get in touch at the Facing a mid-career dilemmaemail address below – I offer a free half hour trial session by phone or Skype.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book your free 30 minute, no obligation, trial coaching session with Wendy Smith now at this Link 

Give the recruiter what they say they want

Give the recruiter what they say they want

Advice from Wendy Smith; Career Coach and author of The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book – order on Amazon

Here is a tip from my book; The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book; How to Win Jobs and Influence Recruiters.

Give the recruiter what they say they want – successful companies focus on meeting the wants of their customers. Note what I said there; I wrote the word “wants,” not the word “needs”. A customer may not know what they need. But they do know what they want. And that may well not be the same thing. It is all too easy to lose sight of this. Then, you focus on what you think they need or, even worse, what you feel comfortable delivering.

If you stop to think about it, exactly the same thing applies when you are applying for jobs.

Getting the job doesn’t so much depend on you providing what you think they need. It depends on you providing what they think they want and believe they need. Give the recruiter what they say they want – it is important.

This may come as a shock to some unsuccessful candidates who believed they had what it took to do the job. They had decided what the employer should be looking for in a particular role. So that is what they set out to show. But what the employer believed they wanted was something rather different.

This is why it is so important to read the job specification carefully! Then make sure you show how you can deliver exactly what the employer has said they need. If there is no job specification, ask lots of questions and research the employing organization carefully.

If the recruiting employer really is way off the mark in terms of what they think they want, they are much more likely to listen to you when they are convinced by your credentials.

Win their confidence first in, say, your technical ability, then try to do a little re-education. But do it with care – it is just possible there is very good reason for what they wanted. Confidence is all in job search but don’t give the recruiter an opportunity to confuse that with arrogance.

Other resources for the job seeker

As a job seeker, there are lots of useful techniques to learn or to refresh. From writing a modern CV to wooing at the interview, you’ll find lots of tips in my handy little pocket book.

job search networking
A concise and practical little workbook. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

A concise and practical little work book. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

Find this and my other books on my Amazon page at this link; http://ow.ly/BRSAL

Remember working with a career coach can really help job search. Get in touch at the Facing a mid-career dilemmaemail address below – I offer a free half hour trial session by phone or Skype.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book your free 30 minute, no obligation, trial coaching session with Wendy Smith now at this Link 

Your first day in a new job!

Your first day in a new job!

Career Development: Your first day in a new job!

Advice from Wendy Smith; Career Coach and author of The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book – order on Amazon

Here is a tip from my book; The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book; How to Win Jobs and Influence Recruiters.

Your first day in a new job! – so you are starting a new job on Monday. Many congratulations. Here are a few tips to help you make a good impression on your first day.

  1. If you’ve been out of work for some time, you may need to re-train your body to keep regular “working” hours. To do this successfully you need a couple of weeks, if possible, of going to bed and getting up at the same time as you will when you start work. That should give your internal clock some chance of adapting.
  2. Make sure you test drive the journey to your new workplace at the time of day when you will be travelling. If you take public transport, check the timetable and on your first day allow at least ten minutes extra for your journey. This isn’t the day to be late
  3. Every office has its own informal (and sometimes formal) dress code. Pay attention to what other people are wearing when you go for the interview. If you are not sure then speak to the HR department and ask them. You want to fit in as quickly as you can and how you dress can help you. In any case go for clean and well-pressed clothes and clean your shoes. Don’t break in new shoes on your first day.
  4. The first day will be a whirlwind of introductions and meetings. You’ll collect lots of information but there will be lots you are likely to forget. Carry a small notebook and make notes – you’ll be grateful later. For technical stuff, learn the names of those to go to for advice; don’t try to learn complicated routines on your first day. Names and roles are usually the most important notes to take; people like you to remember their name.
  5. Don’t be scared to ask questions. If your boss gives you a task, try to get all the details straight during that first meeting. Asking questions won’t look stupid – just intelligent and thorough. Ask who, apart from the boss, you could go to with later questions if you have them.
  6. Remember, the best way to get people on-side is to listen to them. Show respect for their opinions even if you don’t agree with them. Make sure you understand their ideas and value them before considering introducing your own.

Other resources for the job seeker

As a job seeker, there are lots of useful techniques to learn or to refresh. From writing a modern CV to wooing at the interview, you’ll find lots of tips in my handy little pocket book.

Your first day in a new job!
A concise and practical little workbook. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

A concise and practical little work book. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

Find this and my other books on my Amazon page at this link; http://ow.ly/BRSAL

Remember working with a career coach can really help job search. Get in touch at the Facing a mid-career dilemmaemail address below – I offer a free half hour trial session by phone or Skype.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book your free 30 minute, no obligation, trial coaching session with Wendy Smith now at this Link 

Be passionate in your job search

Be passionate in your job search

Job Search:Time To Be Passionate

Advice from Wendy Smith; Career Coach and author of The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book – order on Amazon

Be passionate –  when people talk to me about career development and job search, I tell them they need to be clear about what really matters to them. Lots of people look for roles that show what they think they should want. They don’t consider what they actually enjoy doing. Usually, this has to do with money! It is difficult to be passionate about a job you do just for the money. And being passionate is key to impressing a prospective employer.

Now, let us not be naive, money is important to most of us. But to take a job that meets no other criteria, can be the first step on the road to disaster.

You need to understand what you really care about. And when it comes to interviews, you may well be asked what you are passionate about.

But, you have to be practical. Saying that your passion is for something that is going to mean traveling to the other side of the world for weeks at a time may not get you that job with a local employer.

Be honest. But think about what is going to present you in a reasonable light at your interview. And make sure that you can back up your statement with information about your experience and future intentions.

Do not declare a passion for something you know very little about it. You should be able to talk about your choice with interest and enthusiasm.

Having and showing passion, and the energy associated with it, is attractive. It makes you more interesting to employers and to the world at large. You become a little more charismatic.

So, what is your passion?

Other resources for the job seeker

As a job seeker, there are lots of useful techniques to learn or to refresh. From writing a modern CV to wooing at the interview, you’ll find lots of tips in my handy little pocket book.

be passionate
A concise and practical little workbook. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

A concise and practical little work book. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

Find this and my other books on my Amazon page at this link; http://ow.ly/BRSAL

Remember working with a career coach can really help job search. Get in touch at the Facing a mid-career dilemmaemail address below – I offer a free half hour trial session by phone or Skype.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book your free 30 minute, no obligation, trial coaching session with Wendy Smith now at this Link 

Contact Employers Direct

Contact Employers Direct

Contact Employers Direct In Your Job Search

Advice from Wendy Smith; Career Coach and author of The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book – order on Amazon

Here is a tip from my book; The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book; How to Win Jobs and Influence Recruiters.

Contact employers direct in your job search because most vacancies, particularly in the private sector, are never advertised. They are filled by people already known to the employer or known to a contact of the employer. So it is makes sense to make yourself known.

There is no reason you should not contact an employer to find out more about the organization and to ask about opportunities. If an employer can fill a job without advertising, it saves them time and cost.

Even if they don’t have vacancies right now and you make a good impression, they are likely to think of you in the future.

Making Contact

First, find out as much as you can about the organization before you write. Identify a suitable senior manager or professional and address your letter to them. Look for someone in a position of influence but outside HR. A direct approach to a senior executive in the department you want to work in is usually more successful.

Tailor your letter carefully to show your interest in the organization; tell them why you would like to work with them. Show how what you have to offer might meet their needs. Ask for an opportunity to talk to them to learn more about the organization and future opportunities. Offer to send your CV.

Keep your letter simple, straight forward, polite and on one sheet. Check it very carefully for accuracy and typos.

If you have done your research and show a real interest in the organization and how you can add value, a direct contact can be very successful.

Other resources for the job seeker

As a job seeker, there are lots of useful techniques to learn or to refresh. From writing a modern CV to wooing at the interview, you’ll find lots of tips in my handy little pocket book.

Contact employers direct
A concise and practical little workbook. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

A concise and practical little work book. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

Find this and my other books on my Amazon page at this link; http://ow.ly/BRSAL

Remember working with a career coach can really help job search. Get in touch at the Facing a mid-career dilemmaemail address below – I offer a free half hour trial session by phone or Skype.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book your free 30 minute, no obligation, trial coaching session with Wendy Smith now at this Link 

Providing References in Job Search

Providing References in Job Search

Advice from Wendy Smith; Career Coach and author of The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book – order on Amazon

Providing References in Job search – here is more advice from The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book.

Recruiters usually ask for references when you apply for a job. And many job seekers feel uncomfortable about approaching potential referees. You shouldn’t feel embarrassed though. Most people feel flattered when asked, but you should give them the opportunity to say no. Tell them you will understand if they feel they simply don’t know you well enough to help.

Here are my top tips for providing references in job search successfully.

  • Don’t add referees to your CV. When providing references, list them on a separate piece of paper if they are asked for by the recruiter.
  • Provide at least three. If the recruiter doesn’t specify how many are required, give three with clear contact information. Contact details should include name, role, organization, postal address, email and telephone number.
  • Include professional connections who will say things that support how well you are qualified for the job. You could include employers, colleagues and customers from earlier jobs. Also people you have worked with as a volunteer, or studied with like teachers and lecturers.
  • Short on professional references? Include a personal reference who can attest to your character and abilities.
  • Your present employer. If your present employer doesn’t know you are applying, don’t give their name at an early stage. If you are successful you will probably be asked to give their details later. Have care when you tell your present employer you are applying elsewhere and show them how you aim to support your current work before any move.
  • Ask permission. Always ask permission before you give someone’s name and tell them about any vacancy where you have mentioned them.
  • Remind your referees how good you are. I usually suggest people explain the vacancy to their referees and remind them why they think it is a good fit.
  • Are you in the public sector? Many public sector organizations will only offer bland references as your employer. When it arrives their reference may only be a statement that you worked for them in a particular grade or role over a particular time. Most large private sector employers know this but for others you may have to explain. You will usually need to give something more. Try asking your line manager or someone in your management line, if they would be ready to give you a personal reference as well as the one sent officially by HR. Many managers are more ready than you expect to help. Also consider approaching retired senior colleagues and others who have left the organization. You might also consider asking for a personal reference from someone who holds a senior position in the private sector. This is where people you have met during work in a voluntary capacity may be useful. Otherwise, consider people you have met through clubs and associations.
  • Say thank you. It is courteous thank your referees and let them know the outcome of your application. Who knows, if you are unsuccessful, they may be only too happy to let you know about a vacancy they just heard about.”

This is advice from my book; The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book, How to Win Jobs and Influence Recruiters.

Other resources for the job seeker

As a job seeker, there are lots of useful techniques to learn or to refresh. From writing a modern CV to wooing at the interview, you’ll find lots of tips in my handy little pocket book.

Providing References in Job Search
A concise and practical little workbook. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

A concise and practical little workbook. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

Find this and my other books on my Amazon page at this link; http://ow.ly/BRSAL

Remember working with a career coach can really help job search. Get in touch at the Facing a mid-career dilemmaemail address below – I offer a free half hour trial session by phone or Skype.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book your free 30 minute, no obligation, trial coaching session with Wendy Smith now at this Link 

Job Search Networking

Job Search Networking; another reason to network on-line and use social media

Advice from Wendy Smith; Career Coach and author of The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book – order on Amazon

Here is a tip from my book; The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book; How to Win Jobs and Influence Recruiters.

Job search networking today – back in the day, you painstakingly typed out one CV and posted that to all potential employers. The next generation attached that same one CV to an email and sent it out to all. Then we learned to turn one electronic CV into several to meet the needs of a particular job and a particular employer.

Now, things have moved on again. Your CV has become an active, living, part of your job search. It is very much tied into how you present yourself on-line and your personal “brand.”

These days most employers research on-line for candidates when they make significant appointments. Employers also go on-line to find out more about candidates. They may put your name into a search engine like Google and see what comes up. And they will expect to find you! This may come as a shock to older employees where having a low public profile has usually been regarded as an asset.

In fact, the chance that they will find nothing about you on-line is becoming more and more remote. And having nothing about you on-line is a clear disadvantage in job search. It sends a message that you wouldn’t feel comfortable with modern office tools.

So rather than leave it to chance, you need to know what is on-line about you. Then, if necessary, take steps to influence it for the good.

Job search networking is a great idea anyway.

There are huge advantages in using social media in your job search anyway. Using sites like Twitter, Facebook and, particularly, LinkedIn is a great way to network, to find new opportunities and to raise your on-line profile.

Make sure you have a well filled out LinkedIn profile. There is lots of advice on the LinkedIn site for how to do this. Fill it out completely using keywords – the words people will use to find someone who does your type of work. Putting in those keywords won’t just help people find you on LinkedIn, they could also help you rank higher up in Google when someone does a general search for your name.

You need to check what else is on-line about you already. Put your own name into Google and see what comes up. If there is something unhelpful, where you can, do your best to put things right! For example, if there is an unflattering picture of you on Facebook, ask the person who put it there to remove it. There is a lesson here for the future in terms of what you put on-line yourself or allow others to post. These days, I try to avoid anyone taking pictures of me with their phone at parties and events.

Enjoy social media but use it with care. Remember even with the right privacy settings applied you are still pretty much out in the open. You’d be surprised how casually friends may be about sharing your views and comments. Be yourself but show the wise you to potential employers

Other resources for the job seeker

As a job seeker, there are lots of useful techniques to learn or to refresh. From writing a modern CV to wooing at the interview, you’ll find lots of tips in my handy little pocket book.

job search networking
A concise and practical little workbook. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

A concise and practical little work book. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

Find this and my other books on my Amazon page at this link; http://ow.ly/BRSAL

Remember working with a career coach can really help job search. Get in touch at the Facing a mid-career dilemmaemail address below – I offer a free half hour trial session by phone or Skype.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book your free 30 minute, no obligation, trial coaching session with Wendy Smith now at this Link