Job Interview – Say Thank You After

Job Interview – Say Thank You After

job interviewJob Interview – say thank you after by email, letter or even by text but you can’t avoid it.  It has become so much of a custom that some employers think less of you, if you don’t do it.

Send your thanks within 24 hours of being interviewed, if you can, and you need to tailor your letter it to suit the organization!  The style should reflect the kind of organization and the type of interview you’ve had; a formal process requires a formal response.

If you are not sure what to write, then you can use a thank you letter template as a guide.

Your letter is a chance to emphasize what a good fit you are for the job.  Even, if you have decided the organization is not one you want to join, still send polite thanks. Who knows what the future holds?

You can use the letter to reinforce what a good fit you are for the job, now that you know more about it.  And your letter is a good opportunity to flag up things they need to know but didn’t ask at the interview. You can add what you didn’t mention or make something clearer.

If you have some information that might be useful to them or thoughts on helping to solve an issue they raised, that can make you to stand out from the crowd.

Some people recommend writing to everyone you spoke to in the organization. But, personally, I prefer to write to the person who is leading job search within the organization.

Remember to proof-read your letter carefully – nothing is more off-putting than reading a letter from a candidate that includes typos. If you are not sure of the spelling of names and the correct titles, then ring the organization to check.

Timing comes before creative brilliance – get your letter in as soon as you can – most organizations make their minds up about interviewees pretty quickly.

Working with a coach really can make your job search zing! Get in touch at the email address below.
Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

Rejection is part of job search

Rejection is part of job search

Rejection is part of job search. Buttress yourself up against it and keep it in perspective. It hurts, though, when you don’t get thejob that you prepared for so carefully. But a job interview really isn’t a measure of your personal or professional worth. What it is about is an organization matching people against the criteria they have chosen to apply.  And they didn’t think you were the perfect match on the day.  That doesn’t mean you are not an outstanding professional with great ability. It just means they think they were not looking for you.

Interviews are not about personal or professional validation. But sadly that is how many of us end up thinking. It is dangerous. If you need personal validation you may need to work on your confidence. Job interviews are too risky to be part of the process.

Unfortunately not getting the job can lead to ruminating on what just happened and on past failure. That makes you feel miserable. So try to stay in the present and look forward.  Focus on what you are good at and what you really care about. But recognize that no one is perfect.

You can use the experience for learning though. Make sure you get as much feedback as you can.  Ask the recruiter and press (politely) if you have to get good information. And then evaluate. Don’t take criticism personally and don’t assume automatically that it is valid. It is just an opinion on that day and in that context.  But do listen and read carefully any feedback you are given.

Accept reality – rejection is part of job search. Buttress yourself up against it and keep it in perspective.  Don’t start blaming them or yourself for what has happened. But do accept responsibility for your own performance. Accept valid and reasonable criticism, given in good faith.

Know that you are not alone. Every day countless others will be sharing your experience. Sometimes it helps to seek out others and share support.  You can also share contacts and job leads.  You could find a local job club.

Stay healthy, eat, exercise and spend part of everyday doing something you really enjoy.  Upwards and on-wards the right job for you might be just round the next corner.

If you need support from a coach in your job search, I’ll be happy to help.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Career, Life and Business Coach

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

Job Interview – Helpful Quotes

Job Interview – Helpful Quotes

Job Interview – helpful quotes if you have one coming up shortly

  1. Remember why you are going! “You go to a job interview to discover whether your talents, abilities, interests and direction are a good fit for the job, the company, and the company’s mission.” Susan M Heathfield
  2. Research the company ahead of time. The more you know about the company, the easier it will be to respond to questions. Alison Doyle
  3. Use Your Contacts! “Who you know at the company really does matter. ….use your contacts and connections to get an insider advantage so you can ace the interview and impress the interviewer.” Alison Doyle
  4. Check the Job Requirements. Before you go to an interview, check the job requirements listed in the job posting you responded to. Make a list of the skills you have that match those requirements. Review the list prior to the interview and if you need a “cheat sheet” jot down the list on the notepad that you bring to the interview with you. Alison Doyle
  5. Dress for success! “Before job interviews, I think: What colour tie best represents me as a person this company would be interested in?
” Jarod Kintz,
  6. Walk in confidently. It’s important you look as professional as possible from the outset. As soon as you walk into the building you’ll begin to be judged on your behaviour. There are even instances where recruiters watch from their office as candidates arrive, to see how their body language changes. Reed.co.uk
  7. Watch your Body Language “Remember: recruiters will only see how you behave; they won’t see how you’re feeling. By getting an interview, the prospective employer already thinks you can do the job on paper. Now it’s up to you to show your confidence and use body language to your advantage.” Reed.co.uk 
  8. Keep your pitch simple and direct: This is what I can do for you. Scott Reeves
  9. The interviewer’s stock question “Tell me about yourself” isn’t a request for childhood memories or a run-down of academic prizes won, but a call for a brief overview of what you bring to the table. Scott Reeves
  10. If they ask “Why were you fired?” try this! “Being cut loose was a blessing in disguise. Now I have an opportunity to explore jobs that better suit my qualifications and interests. My research suggests that such an opportunity may be the one on your table. Would you like to hear more about my skills in working with new technology?” Joyce Lain Kennedy.
  11. Think before you speak! “Sometimes I start a sentence and I don’t even know where it is going. I just hope I find it a long the way” Unnamed unsuccessful candidate.
  12.  Good Luck. You dreamed, you believed and you worked. Now, go and achieve!
    Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
    Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

    Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

    Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

             

Job Search: Tried and Tested Interview Tips

Job Search: Tried and Tested Interview Tips

 

Wendy Mason is a Career Coach and Life Coach helping you to solve difficult problems at work and at home

So, here we are at the beginning of another week and outside my window the sun is shining despite the cold. For some of us it is the beginning of another week of job search, so I thought today I’d repeat some general tips on handling interviews.

  • Don’t expect the interviewers to remember what you said in your CV/application form, when they ask a question, give them a complete answer. (Do remind yourself of exactly what you did write though before the interview)
  • Take time to breathe before you answer each question. Think about the question and prepare the answer. Don’t just gush out an incomplete answer.
  • If you don’t understand the question ask for more information. Not every interviewer is good at asking questions and, in any case, interviewers would prefer you understood what they were asking and gave them an appropriate answer.
  • Don’t answer any question with a simple “yes” or “no” – always add some detail but don’t waffle.
  • Remember an interview is the time to show them that you are the right person for the job, so don’t be embarrassed about showing how good you are.
  • Be up-beat and don’t moan or complain about anything, if you want the job. Even if you have good reason not to like a past employer this isn’t the time to complain about them – it will make the interviewer wonder whether you can be a loyal employee.
  • Don’t put yourself down with false modesty and don’t make excuses. If they didn’t think you were good they would not have asked you to the interview. Be true to yourself and honest but be sensible – now is not the time to express you secret doubts about any lack of experience.
  • Watch your body language, give the interviewers good eye contact, show interest and look attentive.  Sit and stand confidently and have a good hand shake ready – practice if necessary. Speak clearly and simply at a level that they can hear. Keep to the point and give concise answers.
  • Show real interest in the organization and enthusiasm for the work; nothing is more attractive to a potential employer. But don’t fake it – work on what you like about the opportunity! 

If you are going for an interview shortly, I wish you luck and if I can help, please get in touch.

Wendy Mason  is a Career Coach and Life Coach helping you to solve difficult problems at work and at home
wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com 
http://wisewolfcoaching.com

  • Values and Why They Are Important Part 2 Determine your own values.
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  • Job Search: References for those in the public sector

Job Search and Personal Values

Job Search and Personal Values

Sometimes these days job search seems to take such a long time that when you do find something that looks a good in terms of role, other considerations go out of the window. This can be dangerous.

So you’ve seen this advert for a wonderful job. It is just what you have been looking for the last three months.

It’s a global organization that is doing well in the current market and the part of the organization you are considering is expanding. You have the skills, knowledge and experience they are asking for.

So where is that doubt at the back of your mind coming from – why have you got reservations? Surely at this point you can’t afford not to go for it?

Please pause for a moment and take a few deep breaths. Now sit quietly and think about what is really troubling you. Might it by any chance be about fitting in?

You have been around long enough to know that getting a job is usually about more than simply demonstrating the right competencies. You know there will be some unwritten rules they will apply that have to do with what they regard as your “organizational fit!” Note; I’m not talking here about discrimination on grounds of race or sex, although I do think age discrimination is often an element.

This is about your compatibility and how their conception of the organization’s values and their mode of operation will influence the panel. You know that scrutiny at job interviews and possibly an assessment centre is going to give them lots of opportunity to find out about you and your values, and whether they think you are right for them. And of course if that doesn’t provide all they need what about the reference checks?

How can you prepare to make to make the most of the opportunity and get that job? Well, in my view you, unless you are an actor at Oscar standard, it really isn’t wise to try to fake it! Nor do I think faking it is ethical – but that is something for you to think about.

But, as you are a wise job seeker, you will be researching the company before you get to interview stage. You will look at what they stand for and how they interact with the environment outside the organization. You can also find out something about their operating model and how they treat their staff – this is where having a wide network of contacts is a real advantage.

Then spend some time thinking about what you need to help you succeed in a job. Most of us need to have some belief in an organization’s purpose and vision to feel comfortable. Moral compass sounds a very old fashioned expression but it really does matter that you understand your own values and what you stand for. Is your moral compass compatible with theirs? If not, what is working with them going to do your self esteem?

Do you now think this is truly a good fit! Has that uncomfortable feeling gone away or got stronger? Think very seriously about how much you want this particular job and what it really means to you! Clashing values can lead to lots of frustration on both sides.

When you have made your assessment and committed to the interview, think about how to articulate who you are and what you stand for – how to make your values clear in what you say.

Wendy Mason is the The Career Coach – helping you to find fresh perspectives on your Job Search and Career. She helps you work towards your goals and aspirations, in a way that fits in with both work and home life. Email her at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com,  find her on Skype at wendymason14, or call +44 (0) 2081239146 (02081239146 for UK callers) or +1 262 317 9016 if you are in the US.

A free trial/consultation allows you to try phone coaching from the comfort of your own home and without risk. Don’t forget to ask about the Summer Special Offer 

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7 Phone Interview Tips That’ll Make You Shine

A landline telephone
(Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Phone Interview Tips That’ll Make You Shine

In some cases, telephone interviews are a way for employers to “pre-screen” possible job candidatesbefore they are granted an in-person interview. In other cases, employers will conduct the full interview over the phone. Whether you are required to go through a pre-screening or have already been given the interview, you must be more prepared than you would be for an in-person interview, even if you are allowed to interview in your PJ’s. Below are some telephone interview tips to keep in mind so your next phoneinterview is a success.

Telephone Interview Tips

1. Use a landline. You don’t want to risk having problems with cell phone service. It is irritating for employers to conduct interviews if the call breaks up frequently or is dropped completely. If you don’t have a land line at home, just make sure you are in an area with as much cell phone service as possible. Do what you can so the process runs as smooth as possible….

You can read the rest of this post at this link

http://newgradlife.blogspot.co.uk/2009/12/7-phone-interview-tips-to-get-job-2.html

 

Tips for Successful Interviews

Tips for Successful Interviews

Job Search: 12 Top Really Practical Tips for Successful Interviews

Tips for successful interviews! This short video from PFJ media has 12 really practical tips that you can’t afford to ignore

If you would like some help getting ready for your interview – please get in touch – I offer a free taster coaching session by phone or Skype

Wendy Mason is the The Career Coach – helping you to find fresh perspectives on your Job Search and Career. She helps you work towards your goals and aspirations, in a way that fits in with both work and home life. Email her at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com,  find her on Skype at wendymason14, or call +44 (0) 2081239146 (02081239146 for UK callers) or +1 262 317 9016 if you are in the US.

A free trial/consultation allows you to try phone coaching from the comfort of your own home and without risk. Don’t forget to ask about the Summer Special Offer 

  • Job Search – The Interview – Competency Based Interview Questions and Answers
  • Job Search – Mistakes to Avoid in Your Telephone Interview
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  • Friday Quotes – Inspiration – Change

 

Job Search: 12 Top Really Practical Tips for Successful Interviews

Job Search: 12 Top Really Practical Tips for Successful Interviews

This short video from PFJ media has 12 really practical tips that you can’t afford to ignore

If you would like some help getting ready for your interview – please get in touch – I offer a free taster coaching session by phone or Skype

Wendy Mason is the The Career Coach – helping you to find fresh perspectives on your Job Search and Career. She helps you work towards your goals and aspirations, in a way that fits in with both work and home life. Email her at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com,  find her on Skype at wendymason14, or call +44 (0) 2081239146 (02081239146 for UK callers) or +1 262 317 9016 if you are in the US.

A free trial/consultation allows you to try phone coaching from the comfort of your own home and without risk. Don’t forget to ask about the Summer Special Offer 

  • Job Search – The Interview – Competency Based Interview Questions and Answers
  • Job Search – Mistakes to Avoid in Your Telephone Interview
  • Management and Career Development:The Joys of Office Politics
  • Friday Quotes – Inspiration – Change

 

What is the formula for confidence in interviews, meetings or those big occasions?

Confidence in interviews

Confidence in interviews etc- recently we had a great guest post from Mary Hope on The Benefits Of Good Career Management. Mary has over 30 years of experience in business, teaching, HR, headhunting and coaching.  She believes passionately that people need to understand their own drivers and needs to find fulfilling careers. Today she shares with us her thoughts on how confidence destroys performance at interview and provides a solution.

What is the formula for confidence in interviews, meetings or those big occasions?

You can find lots of help and information about how to build your confidence for an interview. Usually these talk about preparation, rehearsing and looking the part. I give all that advice. But what if that is not enough. What if you know you have done all those things but you still feel a complete bag of nerves? What if you know that you will turn up at the interview shaking? If you know that you will get tongue-tied and worry that you might just dry up? What if you are really anxious that you won’t be able to think of anything to say? OR are you one of those people who just feels ‘I’m no good at interviews’? Who feels that, interviewers will ‘catch you out’ ‘spot that you are not really that good’, put you on the spot. MAYBE you are someone who hates talking about themselves and just feels shy and exposed.

Even if you have confidence in your own abilities to do a job it may not be enough to get you to feel confident in an interview.

And lack of confidence is a major issue in interviews because it clouds the way the interviewers see you.  Interviewers find it really hard to believe that you can do a job confidently if they see you shaking in an interview.

And feeling nervous about the interview will impact on you ability to answer the questions. Nervousness is like static on the line, your brain starts to pay attention to the static and the crackling and stops paying attention to formulating the answers. You tense up and your mouth dries up and you become so self-conscious you dry up. Literally your nerves stop you being able to perform.

If you have had bad experiences in the past they flood back to you and you re-experience failure. Sometimes the bad experiences and fear of failure means that you can’t even do the preparation required.

So how can you overcome this? Well you need to do all the really practical things suggested above and then you need to visualise yourself doing well in the interview. If you are nervous, that can be hard so with my clients I use a relaxation a creative visualisation technique. We literally run through all the things that you need to do perform well and then as I relax them and talk them through an imaginary interview where everything goes really well and they feel really confident. And it works. Clients report a sense of feeling more relaxed and going into their interviews feeling more confident. So imagine your way to success! These techniques work just as well at any nerve-wracking encounter.. big meeting, presentation  whatever.

In order to help more people use this very effective technique I have recorded on a CD, a session which you can purchase from my website . You can listen your way to confidence I have called it The Turbo Charge Interview Confidence Booster and you can find it by clicking here.

Mary Hope supports people to manage their careers more effectively and get paid more, promoted faster and feel more satisfied. She has over 30 years of experience in business, teaching, HR, headhunting and coaching. She believes passionately that people need to understand their own drivers and needs to find fulfilling careers.

Thursday Quotes – Acing the Job Interview

Thursday Quotes – Acing the Job Interview

Job Interview

  1. Remember why you are going! “You go to a job interview to discover whether your talents, abilities, interests and direction are a good fit for the job, the company, and the company’s mission.” Susan M Heathfield
  2. Research the company ahead of time. The more you know about the company, the easier it will be to respond to questions. Alison Doyle
  3. Use Your Contacts! “Who you know at the company really does matter. ….use your contacts and connections to get an insider advantage so you can ace the interview and impress the interviewer.” Alison Doyle
  4. Check the Job Requirements. Before you go to an interview, check the job requirements listed in the job posting you responded to. Make a list of the skills you have that match those requirements. Review the list prior to the interview and if you need a “cheat sheet” jot down the list on the notepad that you bring to the interview with you. Alison Doyle
  5. Dress for success! “Before job interviews, I think: What colour tie best represents me as a person this company would be interested in?
” Jarod Kintz,
  6. Walk in confidently. It’s important you look as professional as possible from the outset. As soon as you walk into the building you’ll begin to be judged on your behaviour. There are even instances where recruiters watch from their office as candidates arrive, to see how their body language changes. Reed.co.uk
  7. Watch your Body Language “Remember: recruiters will only see how you behave; they won’t see how you’re feeling. By getting an interview, the prospective employer already thinks you can do the job on paper. Now it’s up to you to show your confidence and use body language to your advantage.” Reed.co.uk 
  8. Keep your pitch simple and direct: This is what I can do for you. Scott Reeves
  9. The interviewer’s stock question “Tell me about yourself” isn’t a request for childhood memories or a run-down of academic prizes won, but a call for a brief overview of what you bring to the table. Scott Reeves
  10. If they ask “Why were you fired?” try this! “Being cut loose was a blessing in disguise. Now I have an opportunity to explore jobs that better suit my qualifications and interests. My research suggests that such an opportunity may be the one on your table. Would you like to hear more about my skills in working with new technology?” Joyce Lain Kennedy.
  11. Think before you speak! “Sometimes I start a sentence and I don’t even know where it is going. I just hope I find it a long the way” Unnamed unsuccessful candidate.
  12.  Good Luck. You dreamed, you believed and you worked. Now, go and achieve!

Wendy Mason is a Career Coach with Life Coaching skills and expertise in helping people have the confidence they need to be successful at work while maintaining a good work/life balance. You can email her at wendymason