Life Cycle Leadership

Life Cycle Leadership

Life Cycle Leadership! The team behaviour theories of  Tuckman and leadership theories of Hersey and Blanchard plus Adair can be brought together to into a simple model. This will show how different Leadership styles are required across the life cycle of an activity as illustrated in the diagram below.

The Cycle

Life cycle leadership
  • At the start an activity, task or project , the individual, team or group can be confused and uncoordinated! 
  • The leader needs to be more directive; focusing on the task at hand. They promote ownership by the individual or team member and encourage their confidence. 
  • As the team develops, the leader focuses on coaching. This to to get the group into agreeing how they will behave to complete the task! They sort out how they will work together
  • There may be conflict. If so the leader uses a facilitative approach to lead them to resolution. 
  • As the individual or team becomes more confident and self-managed, the leader concentrates on leading the team overall and develops a delegating style!
All this leaves most leaders with a challenge. ‘How do I develop the competence and confidence to use a wide range of leadership styles?’
Well, you could start by following our series of posts on the team development work of Dr Tuckman. Here is a link to the first post;  Forming the Team: Tuckman Part 1 

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

Be A Better Manager – Knowing How To Delegate

Being A Better Manager – Knowing How To Delegate

Do you really know how to delegate? I bet you say you do! But I wonder?

Knowing when, and what, to delegate does help. It should not just be about feeling you’ve got too much to do and you just need to pass something (anything) from your in-tray on to someone else.

When you delegate what you delegate should meet two criteria;

  1. It must lighten your load and free you up to concentrate on what is important for you to do at your level, with your particular skills.
  2. It should help the receiver to learn and grow.

You should give the receiver the authority they need to complete the task just as if you had done it yourself. Of course, you give them only the authority necessary for their work and to complete the task as you would. You need to have a care about this; particularly where budgets are concerned.

Remember, though, that when you delegate, the responsibility remains with you. You need to make sure they have the training they need to do the job and you need to think about how they will be supervised. There needs to be space for them to do the task in their own way, but you need to ensure they understand, and will meet, any necessary standards. Most importantly, you (and they) need to be clear about how you will measure the results.

Then, you need to give them time to practice and you need to accept that when they start, they won’t do the job as well as you.

They will need to know who they can go to for help, if they have a problem.

When you know how to delegate properly, you will have established an opportunity for real personal development for your team. And they will be better motivated as a result. On top of that, you will have more time to concentrate on the work that really requires your input – a win-win situation, all round.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

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HOW MANY LEADERSHIP STYLES DO YOU NEED? LIFE CYCLE LEADERSHIP

Team behavior theory ( Tuckman) and leadership theories (Hershey and Blanchard, Adair) can be brought together to into a simple model  to show how different Leadership styles are required across the life cycle of an activity.

At the start an activity, task or project , the individual, team or group can be confused and uncoordinated!  The leader needs to be more directive; focusing on the task at hand and promoting ownership by the individual or team member and promoting their confidence.  As they develop, the leader focuses on coaching to get them into the normative stage!  Here it is agreed how they will behave to complete the task!  There may be conflict and a leader may need a facilitative approach to lead them to resolution.  As the individual or team becomes more confident and self managed the leader concentrates on leading the team overall and develops a delegating style!

This leaves most leaders with a challenge – how do I develop the competence and confidence to use a wide range of leadership styles?  Working with an experienced confidence coach makes all the difference. I would like to help you.  Email me now to arrange a free, half-hour, coaching session by Skype.

Wendy Mason is a career coach working mainly with professional women who want to make that jump to senior level while having a life outside work. Before working as a coach, Wendy had a long career in both the public and private sectors in general management and consultancy as well as spells in HR. She now divides her time between face to face coaching, and coaching and blogging on-line. Wendy is a trained confidence coach. You can contact Wendy at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com and find out more at http://wisewolfcoaching.com

Coming shortly – Getting There With WiseWolf, the Career and Personal Development Programme – if you would like to know more email wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com

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Successful Delegation

Successful Delegation

Delegation is one of the most important management skills. Good delegation saves you time, develops your people, can be used to groom a successor, and it motivates your team. Poor delegation will cause you and your team frustration – it de-motivates and confuses the other person, and fails to achieve the task. So it’s a management skill you need and that is worth improving. Here are some simple steps to follow to get it right.

Define the task

Confirm in your own mind that the task is suitable to be delegated. Does it meet the criteria for delegating? Make sure the task is

  • Specific
  • Measurable
  • Agreed
  • Realistic
  • Time-bound
  • Enjoyable, at the very least ethical, and worth doing!
  • Recorded

Select the individual or team

First consider why are you delegating to this particular person or team. What are they going to get out of it? What are you going to get out of it? Be clear about why you have chose this person!

Are they competent to do the task

Is the other person or team of people already capable of doing the task?  If not, can their training need be met in time to compete the task?

Explain the reasons

You must explain why the job or responsibility is being delegated. And why to that person or people? What is its importance and relevance? Where does it fit in the overall scheme of things? You need to give as much information as you can!

Be clear about the desired result

What must be achieved?  Make sure they have understood by getting feedback from the other person. How will the task be measured? Make sure they know how you intend to decide that the job has been done.  Be clear about the standard and quality you expect and how this will be judged. What reports will you require as the task is being completed? What methods of checking will you use – be clear at the outset and agree them with the person doing the task.  This will avoid later frustrations.

Consider the resources required

Discuss and agree what is required to get the job done. Consider people, location, premises, equipment, money, materials, other related activities and services. Make sure they are available. Nothing is more de-motivating than being given a task without the resources necessary to complete it.

Agree the deadlines

When must the job be finished? Or if it is an ongoing duty, when are the review dates? When are the reports due ? And if the task is complex and has parts or stages, what are the priorities?

Support and communicate

Think about who else needs to know what’s going on (stakeholders), and inform them. Involve the other person in considering this so they can see beyond the issue at hand. Do not leave the person to inform your own manager or your peers of their new responsibility. Warn the person about any awkward matters of office politics.

Give feedback on results

It is essential to let the person know how they are doing, and whether they have achieved their aims. If not, you must review with them why things did not go to plan, and deal with the problems. You must absorb the consequences of failure, and pass on the credit for success.

Publicize success

Nothing will motivate your team more than hearing about a member’s success and knowing others in your organisation know what has been achieved.  Reward and reinforce success by publicizing it – make opportunities to talk about it.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

TEN STEPS TO SUCCESSFUL DELEGATION

Delegation is one of the most important management skills. Good delegation saves you time, develops your people, can be used to groom a successor, and it motivates your team. Poor delegation will cause you and your team frustration – it de-motivates and confuses the other person, and fails to achieve the task. So it’s a management skill you need and that is worth improving. Here are some simple steps to follow to get it right.

1 Define the task

Confirm in your own mind that the task is suitable to be delegated. Does it meet the criteria for delegating? Is the task

  • Specific
  • Measurable
  • Agreed
  • Realistic
  • Time-bound
  • Enjoyable ideally or at least ethical in that it is worth doing!
  • Recorded
2 Select the individual or team

What are your reasons for delegating to this person or team? What are they going to get out of it? What are you going to get out of it? Be clear about why you have chose this person!

3 Are they competent to do the task?

Is the other person or team of people already capable of doing the task?  If not, can their training need be met in time to compete the task?

4 Explain the reasons

You must explain why the job or responsibility is being delegated. And why to that person or people? What is its importance and relevance? Where does it fit in the overall scheme of things? You need to give as much information as you can!

5. Be clear about the desired result

What must be achieved?  Make sure they have understood by getting feedback from the other person. How will the task be measured? Make sure they know how you intend to decide that the job has been done.  Be clear about the standard and quality you expect and how this will be judged. What reports will you require as the task is being completed? What methods of checking will you use – be clear at the outset and agree them with the person doing the task.  This will avoid later frustrations.

6 Consider the resources required

Discuss and agree what is required to get the job done. Consider people, location, premises, equipment, money, materials, other related activities and services. Make sure they are available. Nothing is more de-motivating than being given a task without the resources necessary to complete it.

7 Agree deadlines

When must the job be finished? Or if it is an ongoing duty, when are the review dates? When are the reports due ? And if the task is complex and has parts or stages, what are the priorities?

8 Support and communicate

Think about who else needs to know what’s going on (stakeholders), and inform them. Involve the other person in considering this so they can see beyond the issue at hand. Do not leave the person to inform your own manager or your peers of their new responsibility. Warn the person about any awkward matters of office politics.

9 Feedback on results

It is essential to let the person know how they are doing, and whether they have achieved their aims. If not, you must review with them why things did not go to plan, and deal with the problems. You must absorb the consequences of failure, and pass on the credit for success.

10 Publicize success

Nothing will motivate your team more than hearing about a member’s success and knowing others in your organisation know what has been achieved.  Reward and reinforce success by publicizing it  – make opportunities to talk about it.