WELL ESTABLISHED WAYS TO MANAGE CHANGE – THE KOTTER MODEL – STEP SEVEN:BUILD ON THE CHANGE

In an earlier post we said there were a number of recognized approaches to structuring a change management programme and we introduced the Kotter model

The model is based on research which showed that there are eight critical steps an organization or service needs to go through to ensure that change happens and sticks. This series of posts will consider these steps in greater detail. we have already dealt with Step One: Create Urgency, Step Two: Form a Powerful Coalition, Step Three: Create a Vision for Change, Step Four: Communicate the Vision , Step Five: Remove Obstacles and Step Six: Create Short-term Wins

Step Seven: Build on the Change

Kotter argues that many change projects fail because victory is declared too early. Real change runs deep and takes time. Quick wins are only the beginning of what needs to be done to achieve long-term change – make sure you take enough time!

Launching one new product using a new system is great. But you may need  launch 10 products to ensure that the new system is well embedded and really working. To reach that 10th success, you need to keep looking for improvements.

Each success provides an opportunity to build on what went right and identify what you can improve.

What you can do:

  • After every win, analyze what went right and what needs improving.
  • Set goals to continue building on the momentum you’ve achieved.
  • Learn about the idea of continuous improvement
  • Keep ideas fresh by bringing in new change agents and leaders for your change coalition.

WELL ESTABLISHED WAYS TO MANAGE CHANGE – THE KOTTER MODEL – STEP SIX:CREATE SHORT-TERM WINS

In an earlier post we said there were a number of recognized approaches to structuring a change management programme and we introduced the Kotter model

The model is based on research which showed that there are eight critical steps an organization or service needs to go through to ensure that change happens and sticks. This series of posts will consider these steps in greater detail. we have already dealt with Step One: Create Urgency, Step Two: Form a Powerful Coalition, Step Three: Create a Vision for Change, Step Four: Communicate the Vision and Step Five: Remove Obstacles

Step Six: Create Short-term Wins

Nothing motivates and gives people confidence more than success. Give your company and your team a taste of victory early in the change process. Within a short time frame (this could be a month or a year, depending on the type of change), you’ll want to have results that your top team and staff can see. Without this, critics, negative thinkers and cynics might hurt your progress.

Create short-term targets which build up to your long- term goal rather than just one long-term goal. You want each smaller target to be achievable, with little room for failure. Your change team may have to work very hard to come up with these targets, but each “win” that you produce can further motivate and inspire  the entire organization.

What you can do:

  • Look for sure-fire projects that you can implement relatively quickly and without help from any strong critics of the change.
  • Don’t choose early targets that are expensive. You want to be able to justify the investment in each project.
  • Thoroughly analyze the potential pros and cons of your targets and make sure you really understand what is required. If you don’t succeed with an early goal, it can hurt your entire change initiative.
  • Reward the people who help you meet the targets.
  • Publicize what you have done

THOUGHTS ON VISIONING AND 10 WAYS TO BE BETTER AT VISIONING

Creating a vision is critical to the success of any programme and particularly Change Progammes – here are some thoughts from Coaching-Businesses-to-Success.Com
Top Ten Things About Visioning

To visualise where you are going, is deeper and more sensory than anything you have ever done before…
And these are the skills of those who are able to create a vision you can really live and breathe…:-

  1. Are Focused
    They are able to visualise in a focused and very clear way what ‘perfect’ will truly look like in the future.
  2. Involve Others
    Bring others into the contribution, such that they might try things they might never have before.
  3. Realise Core Strengths
    Whilst being ultra-keen to grow and evolve, these people are true to the core strengths of the organisation and see the future through that.
  4. Take Time Out
    Make the time for themselves and help others to free up thinking room. And use it fully.
  5. Play the Game
    They encourage a creative environment and take full part personally. They themselves set out to find ways of generating novel and fun ways to make this live.
  6. Think Big
    Top class visions may even be unattainable within lifetimes and are often part of a bigger legacy. many major corporations have 50-year (and more!) visions.
  7. Use Their Senses
    A vital part of Visioning is to be able to use all five senses as fully as possible and alos that wonderful sixth sense, the one of intuition.
  8. Are Knowledgeable
    They keep their eyes and ears open and are fully aware of the possibilities. they suck in information and ideas to help form their thinking. Media, other people, non-business analogies and metaphors too.
  9. Put Aside Beliefs
    Great visionaries can shift themselves into a different dimension when looking at the future and leave their existing beliefs outside the room.
  10. Are Evangelists
    They shout the outcome vision from the rooftops, relating so well to all of their people. They explains it in words which mean something to all involved in future success.
Ten Ways to be Better at Visioning
  1. Get Everyone Onboard
    Create a place and time when as many of your people as possible can get involved. If you can manage 10 or 1000, then do it.
  2. Create an Environment
    Get basics right. Make things feel comfortable when undertaking this activity. Make it a safe place to share. Ensure everyone involved is as relaxed and in a place to contribute.
  3. Experience Fully
    Encourage a ‘virtual walkthrough’ of the future, using good facilitation skills. Get into the moment.
  4. Keep Outputs Individual
    Make sure that everyone is able to contribute in their own way to clear the way for extraordinary insights.
  5. Celebrate Differences
    Value the differences; others are not like you are – so you will gain additional value from them. And they from being involved.
  6. Be Very Open-Minded
    How you handle outcomes will set the scene for future progress, so be very careful to listen, absorb and accept.
  7. Explore Opportunities
    The outputs from these exercises will be extraordinary. Every one is valuable and none should be dismissed. So find out more, it may create more than you think.
  8. Value Everyone
    It’s not just the ideas that are so valuable, your incredible people are too. Don’t miss this wonderful opportunity to celebrate how great they are, personally.
  9. Be Very Descriptive
    Take the chance to think big and encourage people to share their thoughts in glorious detail. Encourage fun through constructive anecdotes and metaphors.
  10. Live, Eat and Breathe It
    Use it as your guiding light. Use this organisational ‘highest goal’ to measure direction. Captivate people with your enthusiasm and decide every action by it.

The Coaching Business to Success Website  Visioning.

WELL ESTABLISHED WAYS TO MANAGE CHANGE – THE KOTTER MODEL – STEP FIVE:REMOVE OBSTACLES

In an earlier post we said there were a number of recognized approaches to structuring a change management programme and we introduced the Kotter model

The model is based on research which showed that there are eight critical steps an organization or service needs to go through to ensure that change happens and sticks. This series of posts will consider these steps in greater detail. we have already dealt with Step One: Create Urgency, Step Two: Form a Powerful Coalition, Step Three: Create a Vision for Change and Step Four: Communicate the Vision

Step Five: Remove Obstacles

If you follow the earlier steps and reach this point in the change process, you’ will have been talking about your vision and building up buy-in from all levels of the organization. Hopefully, your staff will want to get busy and be out there achieving the benefits that you’ve been promoting.

But is anyone resisting the change? And are there people (individuals or groups), processes or structures or even organisations that are getting in its way?

You need to put in place the structure for change, and continually check for barriers/blockers to it. Removing obstacles can empower the people you need to execute your vision, and it certainly helps them move the change move forward.

What you can do:

  • Identify, or hire, change leaders whose main roles are to deliver the change.
  • Look at your organizational structure, job descriptions, and performance and compensation systems to ensure they’re in line with your vision.
  • Recognize and reward people for making change happen.
  • Identify people who are resisting the change, and help them see what’s needed.
  • Take action to quickly remove barriers (human or otherwise).

WELL ESTABLISHED WAYS TO MANAGE CHANGE – THE KOTTER MODEL – STEP FOUR COMMUNICATE THE VISION

In an earlier post we said there were a number of recognized approaches to structuring a change management programme and we introduced the Kotter model

The model is based on research which showed that there are eight critical steps an organization or service needs to go through to ensure that change happens and sticks. This series of posts will consider these steps in greater detail. we have already dealt with Step One: Create Urgency, Step Two: Form a Powerful Coalition and Step Three: Create a Vision for Change

Step Four: Communicate the Vision

What you do with your vision after you create it will determine your success. Your message will probably have strong competition from other day-to-day communications within the company, so you need to communicate it frequently and powerfully, and embed it within everything that you do.

Don’t just call special meetings to communicate your vision. Instead, talk about it every chance you get. “Walk the talk”; be visible and let people see you as the embodiment of the change you intend to make.  Use the vision daily to make decisions and solve problems. When you keep it fresh on everyone’s minds, they’ll remember it and respond to it.

What you do is far more important – and believable – than what you say. Demonstrate the kind of behavior that you want from others.

What you can do:

  • Talk often about your change vision to make it real.
  • Be authentic – openly and honestly address peoples’ concerns and anxieties.
  • Apply your vision to all aspects of operations – from training to performance reviews. Tie everything back to the vision.
  • Lead by example.

WELL ESTABLISHED WAYS TO MANAGE CHANGE – THE KOTTER MODEL – STEP THREE CREATE A VISION FOR CHANGE

In an earlier post we said there were a number of recognized approaches to structuring a change management programme and we introduced the Kotter model

The model is based on research which showed that there are eight critical steps an organization or service needs to go through to ensure that change happens and sticks. This series of posts will consider these steps in greater detail. we have already dealt with Step One: Create Urgency and Step Two: Form a Powerful Coalition

Step Three: Create a Vision for Change

When you first start thinking about change, there will probably be many great ideas and solutions floating around.  You need to link these concepts together into an overall vision so that people can grasp them easily and remember.

A clear vision can help everyone understand why you’re asking them to do something – even when it is uncomfortable. When people see for themselves what you’re trying to achieve, then the directives they’re given tend to make more better sense and they can commit to them.

What you can do:

  • Determine the values that are central to the change.
  • Develop a short summary (one or two sentences) that captures what you “see” as the future of your organization.
  • Try your vision out on a colleague – can they see the big picture?
  • Create your strategy so that it executes your vision.
  • Ensure that your change coalition can describe the vision in five minutes or less.
  • Practice your “vision speech” often.

WELL ESTABLISHED WAYS TO MANAGE CHANGE – THE KOTTER MODEL – STEP TWO CREATE A POWERFUL COALITION

In an earlier post we said there were a number of recognized approaches to structuring a change management programme and we introduced the Kotter model

The model is based on research which showed that there are eight critical steps an organization or service needs to go through to ensure that change happens and sticks. This series of posts will consider these steps in greater detail. we have already dealt with Step One: Create Urgency

Step Two: Form a Powerful Coalition

You will need to convince people that change is necessary. This often takes strong leadership and visible support from key people within your organization. Managing change isn’t enough – you have to lead it and get those who lead the organization to lead the change.

There will be effective change leaders throughout your organization – you just have to find them.  They don’t necessarily follow the traditional company hierarchy. To lead change, you need to bring together a coalition, or team or group, of influential people whose power comes from a variety of sources, including job title, status, expertise, and political importance and just sometimes charisma and personality.

Once formed, your “change coalition” needs to really work as a team, continuing to build urgency and momentum around the need for change through-out the organisation..

What you can do:

  • Go out and find the true leaders in your organization.
  • Ask for an emotional commitment from these key people – explain to them why you need the change..
  • Work on team building within your change coalition.
  • Check your team for weak areas, and ensure that you have a good mix of people from different departments and different levels within your company.

Now you have a powerful coalition

WELL ESTABLISHED WAYS TO MANAGE CHANGE – THE KOTTER MODEL – STEP ONE CREATE A SENSE OF URGENCY

In an earlier post we said there were a number of recognized approaches to structuring a change management programme and we introduced the Kotter model

The model is based on research which showed that there are eight critical steps an organization or service needs to go through to ensure that change happens and sticks. This series of posts will consider these steps in greater detail.

Step One: Create Urgency

For change to happen, it helps if the whole company really wants it. To move a change forward you need to develop a sense of urgency across the organisation around the need for change. This helps you to kick start the initial motivation to get things moving.

This isn’t simply a matter of showing people poor sales statistics or talking about increased competition. It requires an open, honest and convincing dialogue about what’s happening in the marketplace and with your competition and the risk these present. If many people start talking about the possible threat and the solution your change represents, the urgency can build and feed on itself.

What you can do:

  • Identify the potential threats your change is responding to o
  • Present an opportunity to respond to, Examine that opportunities that must be, should be or could be, exploited.
  • Start honest discussions, and give dynamic and convincing reasons for change to get people talking and thinking drive the buzz.
  • Request support and information from customers, outside stakeholders and industry people to strengthen your argument.

Kotter suggests that for change to be successful, 75% of a company’s management needs to “buy into” the change. In other words, you have to really work hard on Step One, and spend significant time and energy building urgency, before moving onto the next steps. Don’t panic and jump in too fast because you don’t want to risk further short-term losses – if you act without proper preparation, you could be in for a very bumpy ride.

MORE ON THE CHANGE CYCLE FROM CHANGING MINDS

The positive change cycle

Disciplines > Change Management > The psychology of change

The positive change cycle

Uninformed optimism | Informed pessimism | Informed optimism | Completion | See also

Just as there is a negative cycle of emotions experienced when the change is not to the liking of the person in question, so also is there a positive cycle. Not all people experience change as a bad thing: some will benefit from the change, whilst others just find change in itself intriguing and exciting.

Uninformed optimism

In the first stage of positive change, the person is excited and intrigued by the change. They look forward to it with eager anticipation, building a very positive and often over-optimistic view, for example that it will be much easier for them and resolve all of their current issues.

And for a time after the change (sometimes sadly short), there is a ‘honeymoon period’, during which they are positively happy with the change.

Informed pessimism

The honeymoon period does not last forever and the rose-tinted glasses start to fade as the untidiness of reality starts to bite. The person finds that things have not all fallen into place, that other people have not magically become as cooperative as they expected, and that things are just not as easy as they had expected.

This pushes them over into a period of gloom when they realize that perfection, after all, is not that easy to attain. This may evidence itself in mutterings and grumblings, but still does not reach the depths of the depression stage of negative change perception (unless the person flips into a delayed negative cycle).

Informed optimism

Before long, however, their original optimism starts to reassert itself, now tinted by a resignation to the reality of the situation. After all, things are not that bad, and a positive sense of potential begins to creep back.

As they look around them and talk to other people, they make realistic plans and move forward with an informed sense of optimism.

Completion

Eventually, things reach a relatively steady platform of realistic and workable action. The person is probably happier than they were before the change started and, with their realistic vision, have the potential to reach giddier heights of happiness as they achieve more of their potential.

Link to Changing Minds http://changingminds.org/disciplines/change_management/psychology_change/positive_change.htm

Change And The Grief Cycle (Kubler-Ross)

Change And The Grief Cycle (Kubler-Ross)

Here is an article from Changing Minds – link below

Background

For many years, people with terminal illnesses were an embarrassment for doctors. Someone who could not be cured was evidence of the doctors’ fallibility. And as a result the doctors regularly shunned the dying with the excuse that there was nothing more that could be done. There was, after all,  plenty of other demand on the doctors’ time.

Elizabeth Kübler-Ross

Elizabeth Kübler-Ross was a doctor in Switzerland who railed against this unkindness. She spent a lot of time with dying people, both comforting and studying them. She wrote a book, called ‘On Death and Dying.’ This included a cycle of emotional states that is often referred to (but not exclusively called) the Grief Cycle.

In the ensuing years, it was noticed that this emotional cycle was not exclusive just to the terminally ill.  But it was also found in other people who were affected by bad news. They may have lost their job or otherwise been negatively affected by change. The important factor was not that the change was good or bad. It was that they perceived it as a significantly negative event.

The Grief Cycle

The Grief Cycle is shown the chart below, It indicates a the roller-coaster ride of activity and passivity as someone wriggles and turns in their desperate efforts to avoid the change.

grief cycle

The initial state before the cycle is received is stable, at least in terms of the subsequent reaction on hearing the bad news. Life before, compared with the ups and downs to come, feels stable.

And then, into the calm of this relative paradise, a bombshell bursts…

Sticking and cycling

Getting stuck

A common problem with the above cycle is that people get stuck in one phase. Thus a person may become stuck in denial, never moving on from the position of not accepting the inevitable future. When it happens, they still keep on denying it.  Such as the person who has lost their job still going into the city only to sit on a park bench all day.

Getting stuck in denial is common in ‘cool’ cultures (such as in Britain, particularly Southern England) where expressing anger is not acceptable. The person may feel that anger, but may then repress it, bottling it up inside.

Likewise, a person may be stuck in permanent anger (which is itself a form of flight from reality) or repeated bargaining. It is more difficult to get stuck in active states than in passivity, and getting stuck in depression is perhaps a more common ailment.

Going in cycles

Another trap is that when a person moves on to the next phase, they have not completed an earlier phase and so move backwards in cyclic loops that repeat previous emotion and actions. Thus, for example, a person that finds bargaining not to be working, may go back into anger or denial.

Cycling is itself a form of avoidance of the inevitable, and going backwards in time may seem to be a way of extending the time before the perceived bad thing happens.

See also

The positive change cycle, Coping Mechanisms, The need for control, Psychoanalysis and mourning

Elisabeth Kübler-Ross, On Death and Dying, Macmillan, NY, 1969

Changing Minds Website – link below

http://changingminds.org/index.htm

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link