Applying for your own job

Applying for your own job

When you have to reapply for own job

Advice from Wendy Smith; Career Coach and author of The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book – Wendy’s books on Amazon

Applying for your own job – I know from working with my coaching clients, that is now a common experience. But I don’t think that reduces the personal pain. There you are doing what you think is a good job and then someone announces a re-structuring. Perhaps there is a merger or your company is acquired by another. Sometimes your organization needs to downsize. For whatever reason, you find yourself at risk and you have to compete for what you believed was yours. It may well be considered the fairest way to handle a change. And it does give all current employees an opportunity to apply. But it still hurts and shakes your confidence if your job up for grabs.

Applying for your own job – tips

  • First share your anger, frustration or disbelief with a partner, a close friend or a with coach like me> Do this and not with your colleagues or your employer. Although organizations are required to be fair, employers are more likely to favour employees with a positive attitude.
  • Set your mind on making the best application you can for the job, emphasizing the value your bring to the organization. Don’t assume your employer knows this already. And they may well bring in HR consultants from outside the organization to run the selection process. Collect together evidence of the value you deliver, for example, performance statistics or new business delivered or letter from satisfied customers.
  • Now is the time for you to show evidence of your competence in your application letter, CV and at interview. You will find lots of advice in other posts on this blog about how to do that. Show how you will fit the role and take particular care to tailor what you say to suit any new requirements.
  • Don’t presume you’ll get the job; there may be a limited number of opportunities. But do remind yourself regularly just how good you are. Be practical and realistic about the situation – now is the time to start doing those little extras like working late or volunteering for that new project. It is the time for your to reinforce the relationship you have with managers and not to show them your resentment.
  • It can be hard to deal with. And anger and resentment may not be something you get over quickly. If it is badly handled, I know from experience that it can taint your whole view of the organization. That may mean that it is impossible to see staying as a positive option. If you do decide to look for new work, it is better to leave on good terms. Try to understand what led the organization to this point and that there may have been no other options open.

Above all work on not seeing the situation as being about you personally. Do this even though the impact is very personal indeed. You may well benefit from talking things through with a counsellor or a career coach. Remember, I offer a free half hour’s coaching by phone or Skype. My contact details are below.

Other resources to help your job search

In the job market, there are always lots of useful techniques to learn or to refresh. From writing a modern CV to wooing at the interview, you’ll find lots of tips in my handy little pocket-book.

Stress-free Job Search
A concise and practical little workbook. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

A concise and practical little work book, it is for all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

Find this and my other books on my Amazon page at this link; http://ow.ly/BRSAL

Remember working with a career coach can really help both  job search and career resilience. Get in touch at the Facing a mid-career dilemmaemail address below – I offer a free half hour trial session by phone or Skype.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book your free 30 minute, no obligation, trial coaching session with Wendy Smith now at this Link 

Your boss doesn’t talk to you

Your boss doesn’t talk to you

Advice from Wendy Smith; Career Coach and author of How To Get On With The Boss – order on Amazon

Your boss doesn’t talk to you! So you’ve done the new job for a while now. And you think you are doing OK. In fact you think you are doing better than OK.

But your boss gives you no sign of what she thinks about your performance. She comes in everyday, wishes you good morning and then disappears into her office. She’s quite pleasant and there is no suggestion that there is a problem, you just need to know what she really thinks about what you are doing.

This situation can feel totally demoralising and you begin to have all kinds of doubts. What can you do?

Well, you have to grasp the nettle and ask for the feedback that isn’t being volunteered.

First, gather your own evidence about your performance, such as, feedback from customers. Then, think about the questions you want to ask and how you are going to ask them; you don’t want to alienate your boss.

Now ask your boss for some time to talk. Choose your moment carefully – don’t ask when the boss is under pressure or about to go to an important meeting. Make sure you get the appointment in the boss’s diary and that you get enough time for a proper discussion. Ideally, you need at least 30 minutes – again not before or immediately after an event on which your boss is going to want to concentrate.

At the meeting make sure you emphasize that you want to take care of your boss’s interests as well as your own. You want to make sure that you are doing the job the boss wants you to do. Avoid getting into arguments or being confrontational. Use the evidence you have collected if you face any criticism you consider unjustified.

I expect you will be pleasantly surprised and that your boss is happy with what you’re doing. You just need to remind them that that is something you need to be told. I am sure all is well but you won’t know that for sure until you ask. Good luck.

Other resources for people with problem bosses

As a coach I work with lots of people who have problems with their boss. So I wrote a little book to help them. You can help your boss help you – don’t be made unhappy, suffer stress and lose confidence because you cannot get on with the person in charge. Poor relationships at work can damage life at home as well as your career. My book can help.

Remember working with a career coach can really help you feel happier at work. Get in touch at the Facing a mid-career dilemmaemail address below – I offer a free half hour trial session by phone or Skype.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book your free 30 minute, no obligation, trial coaching session with Wendy Smith now at this Link 

 

How to Get on With The Boss

How to Get on With The Boss

A helpful little eBook from Wendy Smith

You can buy the book at this link

Boss is not a very popular word. Some people have problems thinking of themselves as that kind of person. Others have lots of trouble getting with the person in that role – the boss. I have written little eBook that is available on Amazon. It has lots of advice to help you if you are having trouble getting with your manager. How to Get on With The Boss is brief but wise. And I wrote it because so many of my clients seem to have problems with their boss at work.

Read it. You really will learn how to make a great first and lasting impression at work as well as how to get on with your manager.

Don’t be made unhappy, suffer stress and lose confidence because you cannot get on with the person in charge. Poor relationships at work can damage life at home as well as your career. Unhappiness at work often has long-term effects on health. This little eBook by an experienced manager and coach can really help.

It covers;
• What it means to get on with the boss
• Why it matters
• How to know whether you really are getting on with your boss
• How to get it right
• What your boss really wants
• How requirements can change over time
• Making a good first impression
• Keeping respect once you’re in the role
• What to do when things go wrong
• Bosses with problems
• Demon bosses
• Putting things right
• Moving on when it is time to go
• Bullying

How to Get on With The Boss – you can buy the book at this link

If you don’t find the answer to your problem in the book then please get in touch with me. Coaching really can help, so email me at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com 

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

Toxic Manager – how to respond

Toxic Manager – how to respond

Danger – Red Light flashing. Toxic Manager About!

How well do you get on with your manager? Easy question really, isn’t it? You would be surprised how many people are not clear about the answer. They don’t know what the manager/team leader/supervisor really thinks about them, or the work they do. Sometimes, this is because they, themselves, lack the communication skills necessary to understand the message the manager is sending. Sometimes, it is because the manager doesn’t communicate well with the rest of the team.

Getting on well with the boss matters hugely in terms of your career success. Plus, the stress caused when things go wrong can have a negative effect on your health and well-being. Stress can lead to anxiety and depression which in turn affect life at home as well as at work.

You can find out how you’re doing by listening and watching how the person in charge behaves. You need to observe not only how they behave with you, but also how they behave with other people. It is easier, of course, if you have frequent contact with your manager. But, even if you do not, you can try to learn as much as possible about them and how they behave from others. Ask your questions with care, though, you don’t want it to get back that you think you may have a problem.

Here is a mini-health-check based on one in my little eBook; “How to Get on With Boss.”  It will help you get clearer about the relationship climate in your workplace.

Signs that all is well;

  • You belong to a happy team who work well together
  • You feel accepted by all
  • Each day your manager greets you and the others by name
  • Everyone feels at ease with him/her
  • You get regular and constructive feedback from your manager
  • You are not worried about asking for help when you need it
  • If something does go wrong you feel you can tell your manager about it and get a reasonable response.

If most of these things are happening for you, all is well and you are getting on well with our manager. Celebrate because, unfortunately, I suspect you are one of the happy few.

Signs that all is not well;

  • The team is generally unhappy
  • Everyone moans about your manager
  • The manager doesn’t seem to know who you are
  • The manager doesn’t seem to want to know anything about you
  • They don’t offer support
  • Feedback, if you get it, is definitely not positive
  • People are afraid to ask for help
  • Everyone is frightened of telling the boss when something goes wrong
  • People feel threatened
  • There is lots of gossip but no one really knows what is going on “up the line” or elsewhere in the organization

Signs like this mean that all is not well. Neither you, nor the other members of the team, are getting on with the person in charge. You need to take action to ensure your toxic manager doesn’t damage you, your career, your health or your happiness. You can find out more about my little eBook at this link.

Working with a coach really can help you be a better manager. Get in touch at the email address below – I offer a free half hour trial session by phone or Skype.
Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

Working With a New Boss

Working With a New Boss

Working With a New Boss

Working with a new boss can be a challenge, But here are some tips to help you prepare,

Rumours fill a vacuum

Before a new boss arrives you may here all kinds of rumours about them, some good and some perhaps worrying. Stay calm but keep your wits about you till you have some real news. Once you have a name for your new boss, do your own research. Find out as much as possible about them but stay in a neutral space. Don’t add to the rumor mill and don’t assume that reputations are always justified. Give your new boss a chance.

Give the new boss some space 

When the new boss arrives, give them time and space to settle in. Don’t rush to be the first to make a good impression – there will be lots of people doing  just that.  But be courteous and welcoming – be optimistic.  Do your job as well as you can. 

Help when it is needed

 Show you are willing to help and support when your new boss needs help.  Make it clear you are happy to share your knowledge of the organization and to make introductions. Accept that your new boss will have their own way of doing things. And too much “this is how we do things here” from you, will really irritate.

Be authentic 

Be yourself with the new boss and don’t pretend to know more than you do.  If they ask a question you can’t answer, then offer to go and find out. Don’t bluff. If they are any good they will see straight through it. Above all, don’t pretend to be someone in the organization that you are not. Pretending to be on first name terms with the CEO can rebound on you. 

An opportunity to make a fresh start

Most new bosses will have made some inquiries about key people in their new team.  But there is probably still a chance to make a fresh start.  As you get to know your new boss, take the opportunity to make a positive impression.  Show how good you are. And, when the new boss has settled in, make sure they know how interested you are in your own career.

What about new bosses who want to bring in new teams?

Some new bosses do prefer to bring in new teams. In your research before the new boss arrives, you may be able to find out if this so. Have done in the past?  If so, do all the things, I’ve suggested above. Give your new boss an opportunity to see how valuable and how flexible you can be.  Show them that you can adapt to the new situation. But be realistic – brush up your CV and keep an eye open for other possibilities. Make sure you line-up your old boss up to give you a glowing reference.

Working with a new boss – accept the new situation

Accept that change happens.  Things cannot stay the same, so accept that with grace.  You may be sorry to see your old boss go. But the future is full of new possibilities.  Do your best to make the most of the opportunity..

You will benefit from the support of a coach in dealing with your change.  My email address is below.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

Career Success Quotes

Career Success Quotes

Career success quotes – some words to inspire you!

    1. Don’t limit yourself. Many people limit themselves to what they think they can do. You can go as far as you mind lets you. What you believe, you can achieve. Mary Kay Ash
    2. Decide what you want, decide what you are willing to exchange for it. Establish your priorities and go to work. H.L. Hunt
    3. To love what you do and feel that it matters – how could anything be more fun? Katherine Graham
    4. The best job goes to the person who can get it done without passing the buck or coming back with excuses. Napoleon Hill
    5. Remember that you are needed. There is at least one important work to be done that will not be done unless you do it.  Catherine Pulsifer
    6. The will to win is important, but the will to prepare is vital. Joe Paterno
    7. The ultimate inspiration is the deadline. Nolan Bushnell
    8. Work while others are wishing. Thomas A. Edison
    9. Winners take time to relish their work, knowing that scaling the mountain is what makes the view from the top so exhilarating. Denis Waitley
    10. People become really quite remarkable when they start thinking that they can do things. When they believe in themselves they have the first secret of success. Norman Vincent Peale
    11. Real success is finding your lifework in the work that you love. David McCullough
    12. Your work is to discover your work and then with all your heart to give yourself to it. Buddha
Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

giving a presentation

Giving a Presentation – Tips

Giving a presentation – there comes a time in every leader/manager’s life when it is necessary to give a presentation. This might be to a board, a small élite team or a very large group. You will want to keep them interested, alert and engaged right through from the start to finish! Here are some tips.

  1. Giving a presentation – start with a bang. Make sure you open with impact. Start off with something that really grabs your audience’s attention. No don’t shout fire – but do say something memorable. Make a strong impression and get their interest straight away. You could start with a remarkable fact about the organization or something surprising about you. But don’t be too shocking in a work environment.
  2. Say why you are there – tell them your purpose. Why are you speaking to them? Tell your audience clearly what this is about. Be clear yourself why you are there and then make it clear to them. Then stick to your purpose. Make sure your presentation is well focused.
  3. Be the leader – stay in control. This is your presentation and you are responsible for it. Show you are in control Make sure you do the talking, not your slides. They only exist to support you Make sure you let your personality show through.
  4. Make it the right length.  Short and interesting is much better than long and boring.  After the Battle of Gettysburg in 1863, famous orator Edward Everett stood up and talked about the battle for two hours. Then Abraham Lincoln delivered the Gettysburg Address in two minutes. Who do you think made more impact?
  5. Stay on the subject. If you are talking about something your audience is interested in, they will not fall asleep. Do you have some special news to share with them? Are you about to solve a problem for them?  Stay with that and they will stay with you.
  6. Have a call to action. Do you know what you want the audience to do as a result of your presentation? Put it at the end of the presentation for impact. Make it clear and end with it.
  7. You gotta practice! Anything and everything is improved with editing, polishing, smoothing and practicing. Practice your presentation and it will be far more effective when you deliver it.
  8. Be confident.This is easier said than done. But practice will help. Have a short relaxation technique to use in the rest room before hand if you know that you suffer from stage fright. The practice and taking time to prepare properly on the day, will also help with that. Try to enjoy yourself, if you can, then your audience will do so too.
  9. Be ready for the unexpected. Things can go wrong. You can lose your notes on the day, for example. So have a back up plan and, if you can, try out the equipment before you start.
  10. Give a presentation you would enjoy – make it interesting. If you are passionate about your subject and enjoy it, others will too. If you are warm and interesting – they will love it.
Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

How To Get Promoted Part 2

How To Get Promoted Part 2

Career Development – Get that Promotion; Part 2

How To Get Promoted – are you doing well in your present role but feel ready Get Promotedfor the next step up? Even in this tough economic climate some people are still managing to get promotion. But how do you make yourself part of that élite group? This is the second in a two post series.  Here is a link to Part 1 – link

How To Get Promoted – Last week I suggested that you should;

  • Create a portfolio of work you have done, showing your value to the organization,
  • Volunteer for more responsibility,
  • Create your own opportunity,
  • Let your ambition show but with discretion,
  • Ask for a private meeting to discuss properly how you are doing.
  • Now here are a further six tips to help you on your way.

Take a deep breath and blow your own trumpet

It is OK to do so if you know the notes to play. You can afford to brag a little, but with care. It doesn’t hurt to remind your boss of your accomplishments. Bosses are human and they do forget things; it helps if you can prompt and do it with facts and figures. Saying you are the Greatest may raise some laughs but that kind of bragging won’t make the kind of impression you want. If you have reduced costs or made some other improvement – quote the numbers. Make sure you concentrate on what is good about your performance, putting down someone else’s performance to make you look good isn’t impressive.

Blackmail doesn’t usually work

Avoid threats and demands. Making your boss squirm is not going to make them want to go out of their way to help you. Threatening to leave will not make your boss think better of you. Using it as blackmail can rebound and lead to doubts about your loyalty. Stay calm and if you feel frustrated, try not to show it.

Have friends in high places

Mentors further up the line are always valuable. If you can get someone on your side before you ask for promotion, it offers great benefits. You will be better informed about what life is like higher up. And it will show your boss you are serious about getting on. It gives you informal influence (outside the organization chart) and it will give you a friendly ear if things get a little tough.

Shine in your present post

Your present role gives you the opportunity to show what you can do. Push it as far as you can – go the extra mile. Work out what excellence really means in the job you do and make that the standard! Beat the deadlines and make a reputation for solving problems. That way you become someone who everyone wants on their team and they can see what an asset you will be at a more senior level. But don’t be personally indispensable. Build a structure that means the your team can function well without you, but make sure people know that it is your team. That way your boss won’t be so scared of losing you that they block your promotion.

Model more senior behaviour

Note how senior people in your organization behave. How do they talk, behave and think? Pick someone you admire and respect. Now use them as a role model. Start to behave in the way that you would like to be perceived.

Keep learning

Take every opportunity to learn more about your field, your profession and the organization in which you work. It will better equip you for a more senior role and it will also impress your boss. It will show that you are serious. About promotion. You will find lots of self-study material on-line which makes it a little easier to combine study with full-time work. No, it isn’t easy to study when you are working but if it is a real investment in you.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

Retirement – what do I do with the rest of my life?

Retirement – what do I do with the rest of my life?

Retirement – whether you chose to go or were pushed out, for example, as part of an organizational change, the time after retirement can feel like a yawning open space. Yes, you know these days retirement is supposed to feel like the start of something, and not an ending. But, for many of us, knowing we are expected to make a fresh start is quite daunting.

For some people it seems simple. They have spent years wanting to have more time for a well-loved hobby. Perhaps they have ideas about turning that hobby into a money-making activity. For others, the most important thing about the time ahead is an opportunity to be with family and grandchildren in particular.

Lots of us, don’t know exactly what to do next. Many need to continue to earn just to pay the household bills. Even, if we don’t need the money, we need a challenge and, perhaps, a new mountain to climb.

So, where to start? Well, ideally, you begin thinking about life after retirement, long before you actually retire. But, if you haven’t had that opportunity, you can still do the work to think through what is going to happen next, shortly after you retire.

Ask yourself these questions;

  • What has given me the most satisfaction in my life so far?
  • At work and at home, what did I really enjoy doing and why?
  • What was I really good at?
  • What did I dislike and would want to avoid in the future?
  • What was I not so good at?
  • In what kind of environment would I want to spend precious time?
  • What have I always dreamed of doing but never had the chance?

The results of this exercise are for your eyes only, so you can afford to be entirely honest.

Now, think about the constraints and how the choices you make may affect the rest of your life and those closest to you.

How free are you to retrain for something new? Do you have resources to pay for that training? Lots of people do retrain for new careers in later life but taking on a programme of training that is going to last several years in unlikely to make sense after 60.

You may want to consider working part-time. That would give you more time for family and other interests. It may also make long-term working more sustainable as it gives you recovery time.

Don’t be afraid to have big dreams and ambitions. Lots of us over 60 have achieved things we never imagined possible ten years earlier. And some of us feel more fulfilled in our work life now than we did earlier, even though we may not be earning quite so much.

Life after retirement is all about quality. Think about what that means for you in your particular circumstances. Now go out there and enjoy yourself.

Working with a coach really can help you have a better life. Get in touch at the email address below – I offer a free half hour trial session by phone or Skype.
Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

Going for Promotion

Going for Promotion

Going for Promotion – if you have the the right qualities, prepare well and have just a little bit of luck, this could be your moment!

Now is the time to;

  • Be the one that volunteers for the difficult task.
  • Make clear that you are prepared to take on more responsibility.
  • Where you see a problem looming, be the one who comes up with a solution –
  • Be there with new and ingenious ways to cut costs
  • Have ideas for new niches
  • Have new skills if they are required
  • Prove what you can do!

Make sure the boss knows you are thinking about the organization, not just yourself!  But when you do something new or extra make sure your boss does know about it.  If it’s not possible to give you a raise now, then can you negotiate something for when things improve – get it on the record!  Can you tie how much you receive to that improvement with your present pay as a fall-back?

Go for it!  You’ve got nothing to lose and at the very worst you will be someone they want to keep around – right now that is a bonus.  Good Luck!

And if you need a little help, just get in touch with me.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link