Making Changes – Defining Change

Making Changes – Defining Change

Making Changes – part 2 of the series. Be Clear About The Change You Want!Defining change

Defining Change – Making Changes is series of posts about how to make positive changes in your personal or professional life that really work . So, I hope it helps you. Perhaps, you have comments, or would like further help? If so, my email address is at the bottom of the article.

In the last post in this series  I discussed the need to face reality,  admit that a change is needed and take responsibility for action.  Now is the time to be quite clear about what you need to change.

Be as specific and detailed as you can in the way you define the change. Starting with a clear and detailed description is important. If you don’t really know what you want, you can find yourself very disappointed after you made the change.

Defining change – tips!

Here are some tips to help you and define change and be clear about the problem you are trying to solve.

  1. Start with what you know now! Write down as much as possible about the thing you want to change, why you want to make a change and how you plan to make it.
  2. Consider what other information you might need. What gaps are there in your knowledge about the change you want to make. Do you understand completely how you are going to make the change and what the full effects might be?  For example, will other people be effected?  Do you need their support in making the change and are you likely to get it? How much time and money will it cost to do it and do you have those resources available?  Does making this change mean you will need to make others – what will they be?
  3. Collect the information you need.  This could include both facts and the opinions of others about the change you plan.  Don’t be afraid to ask for help. What has been their experience in making a similar change – what has worked for them and what has not?  Try to gather as much information as you can.

Now you are ready to define the change you want to make.

If you have gone through the steps above, you are ready to set down in detail what your change is and how you want to make it.  Write it down and make it as clear, colorful and detailed as you can.

The next post in this series is going to cover handling emotions when making changes in our lives. No significant change is made without some impact on our emotions and knowing how to manage that impact can be key to success.

I would love to hear your experiences in making changes in your life

Working with a coach can help you to change successfully – email me at the address below for information on how I can help you.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

The earlier post in this series

How to handle a jealous boss

How to handle a jealous boss

Bosses, like all of us, come with a range of human emotions and one how to handle a jealous bossof them may be jealousy.  Given the number of visits to this post, I guess a lot of people think their boss might be jealous. So here is some advice on how to handle a jealous boss.

Jealousy is usually shown in quite subtle ways in the early stages.

How jealousy might be shown;

  • Have you been relegated to the dreary corner?
  • Do you always seem to be given the most boring work?
  • Are you often given just too much work?
  • May be, you are subject to sarcastic comments?
  • Your manager might just find fault with everything you do?
  • Or start to niggle away at a few small faults you do have?

If some of these apply to you, you need to know how to handle a jealous boss.

Steps to take!

how to handle a jealous boss
Wendy has a concise and practical eBook on how to get on better with your boss. You can find it at this link http://amzn.to/2mshlVJ

First, directly confronting a jealous boss rarely works. Go carefully, particularly if you need to keep the job. It is sad, but in most organisations, unless there is a clear case of bullying, reporting your boss rarely turns out well. The benefit of the doubt will usually be given to the more senior party. Calling on the support of senior contacts against your boss might well rebound. They may not thank you for the information. They may value your boss for his/her technical abilities and your boss may have an otherwise good record.

Hard as it sound, the best approach is usually to make your boss feel you are on their side. They need to believe that, even though you might have it in you to upstage them, you will never do so. They need to feel that you really will support them.

Show your boss that you respect their ability. And ask for their advice. It might be difficult for you at first because you feel that you too are an expert. But it will help to build your relationship.

Make sure you try to make your boss look good. Be ready to share your ideas. Accept that sometimes your ideas might be presented as theirs.  If you have contacts higher up the office, be ready to share them with your boss. And, if your boss has unsung talents, make sure your senior contacts know about them.

If you do find yourself relegated to the dreary corner, see what you can do to brighten things up. In most kinds of work, there is some opportunity to make a positive mark if you look for it.

Remember though if jealousy turns into out-and-out bullying there are legal steps you can take to seek redress.

Overall!

Keep your dignity but turn yourself into an asset for your boss, and not a threat.

There has been a lot of interest in this subject and I’ve received lot a of questions. So, I’ve written a concise and practical eBook on how to get on with the boss. In it you will learn how to make a great first and lasting impression at work. You will find out how to help your boss help you. Don’t be made unhappy, suffer stress and lose confidence because you cannot get on with the person in charge. Poor relationships at work can damage life at home as well as your career. There can be long-term effects on health and on your motivation.  My little eBook can really help you avoid the pitfalls and build a strong, positive, relationship with your boss. There is more on the eBook below but here is a quick link http://amzn.to/2mshlVJ

How To Get On With The Boss covers;

•What it means to get on with the boss
•Why it matters
•How to know whether you get on with your boss
•Getting it right
•What your boss really wants
•How requirements can change over time
•Making a good first impression
•Keeping respect once you are experienced in the role
•What to do when things go wrong
•Bosses with problems
•Demon bosses
•Putting things right
•Moving on when it is time to go
•Bullying

Here is a link to the book

And if you would like a coach to support you as you deal with your boss, please get in touch.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written also written a little book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

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Quotes on Career Success

Quotes on career success

Quotes on Career Success

Quotes on career success to inspire you. Something to think about when you need that extra boost.

Analyzing what you haven’t got as well as what you have is a necessary ingredient of a career. Orison Swett Marden

Communication–the human connection–is the key to personal and career success. Paul J. Meyer

What is the recipe for successful achievement? To my mind there are just four essential ingredients: Choose a career you love, give it the best there is in you, seize your opportunities, and be a member of the team. Benjamin F. Fairless

Any woman who has a career and a family automatically develops something in the way of two personalities, like two sides of a dollar bill, each different in design. Her problem is to keep one from draining the life from the other. Ivy Baker Priest

I’ve yet to be on a campus where most women weren’t worrying about some aspect of combining marriage, children, and a career. I’ve yet to find one where many men were worrying about the same thing. Gloria Steinem

Desire! That’s the one secret of every man’s career. Not education. Not being born with hidden talents. Desire. Bobby Unser

If the career you have chosen has some unexpected inconvenience, console yourself by reflecting that no career is without them. Jane Fonda

To find a career to which you are adapted by nature, and then to work hard at it, is about as near to a formula for success and happiness as the world provides. One of the fortunate aspects of this formula is that, granted the right career has been found, the hard work takes care of itself. Then hard work is not hard work at all. Mark Sullivan

The biggest mistake that you can make is to believe that you are working for somebody else. Job security is gone. The driving force of a career must come from the individual. Remember: Jobs are owned by the company, you own your career! Earl Nightingale

The true measure of a career is to be able to be content, even proud, that you succeeded through your own endeavors without leaving a trail of casualties in your wake. Alan Greenspan

People have an idea that one is in control of a career, a lot more than you really are. You can engineer things to an extent. But you are at the mercy of what comes in across the desk. Gary Oldman

When you are inspired by some great purpose, some extraordinary project, all your thoughts break their bounds. Your mind transcends limitations, your consciousness expands in every direction and you find yourself in a new, great and wonderful world. Dormant forces, faculties and talents become alive, and you discover yourself to be a greater person by far than you ever dreamed yourself to be. Patanjali

The past is not your potential. In any hour you can choose to liberate the future. Marilyn Ferguson

If you follow your bliss, you put yourself on a kind of track, which has been there all the while waiting for you, and the life that you ought to be living is the one you are living. Joseph Campbell

The strongest oak tree of the forest is not the one that is protected from the storm and hidden from the sun. It’s the one that stands in the open where it is compelled to struggle for its existence against the winds and rains and the scorching sun. Napoleon Hill

Keep away from people who try to belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you too can become great. Mark Twain

The decisions you make about your work life are especially important, since most people spend more of their waking lives working than doing anything else. Your choices will affect, not only yourself and those closest to you, but in some way the whole world. Laurence G. Boldt

Talents are common, everyone has them – but rare is the courage to follow our talents where they lead. Anon

There is no security in life, only opportunity. Mark Twain

The people who get on in this world are the people who get up and look for the circumstances they want, and if they can’t find them, make them. George Bernard Shaw

I’m a great believer in luck, and I find that the harder I work, the more I have of it. Thomas Jefferson

I hope these quotes on career success inspire you.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

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Taking A Career Break: Quotes and Resources

Taking a Career Break

Taking A Career Break: Quotes and Resources

Taking a career break! Lots of us think and may be dream about the idea of taking some time out from the daily grind. Here are some quotes on the experience. Plus I’ve included below details of two books to  help you on your way. And now the quotes…

  1.  It is energizing and liberating to turn down a road you have not traveled before. To reach toward what you cannot yet touch brings new passion and strength to your life. Ralph Marston
  2. Disconnect with your work self on a sabbatical, and you’ll reconnect with who you really are.  Corbett Barr
  3. It’s a time to immerse yourself in a different environment, try new things, reassess your priorities, and look at your life from a different perspectiveMarelisa Fabrega
  4. Give yourself the priceless gifts of new experiences, new skills, new knowledge and the confidence of knowing how quickly you can grow. Expand your horizons, again and again, and discover that every limit is there to be transcended.  Ralph Marston
  5. Getting away from it all might be the only way you can really reset or change course. If you continue around the day-to-day, making significant changes is tough. Taking a few months off will give you the space you need to figure things out. Corbett Barr
  6. Taking a sabbatical is the first step towards discovering whether or not I can take the leap of faith and do something fully on my own.  Do anything for a while, and it becomes increasingly harder to cut the cord. Sam Dogen
  7. Of Fortune’s best 100 companies to work for in America, 21 of them have paid-for, formal sabbatical programs. It’s a competitive advantage with regard to recruiting talent. Jaye Smith
  8. Almost everybody got back to some form of better eating and exercise, and they keep that up. And they say, “I didn’t realize what stress I was under. Now I can go back for my next five years with some balance” Rita Foley
  9. My sabbatical didn’t really recharge my batteries as I hoped it would.  Instead, the sabbatical helped realize my preference for freedom over a steady paycheck at this point in my life.  I’ve experienced what life could be like if I worked for myself and I must say that I’m extremely excited about the prospects. Sam Dogen
  10. Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed in the things that you didn’t do than in the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Mark Twain

Books on Taking A Career Break

Escape 101: The Four Secrets to Taking a Sabbatical or Career Break Without Losing Your Money or Your Mind by Dan Clements and Tara Gignac  

“What’s your dream escape? Relaxing on a palm-studded beach? A year off to write your novel? Missionary work with the needy? Exploring ancient ruins or saving the rainforest?

Whether you’re an adventurer, a poet, a volunteer or you just need a break, Escape 101 provides you with a step-by-step system to take as much time as you need from your job, career or business, without losing ground.”

A Gap Year for Grown Ups by Susan Griffith

“A guide for grown ups wanting to take the trip of a lifetime, containing information on specialist schemes and opportunities for professionals and mature travellers. Covers everything from what to pack to paying the mortgage when away, as well as advice from adult gappers who have been there and done it.”

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

Checklist for Career Change

Checklist for Career Change

Changing Careers – Part 1 Where To Start! A Checklist for Career Change

Is it time for you to make career change?

Checklist for Career Change – changing careers isn’t easy. But nor is it as hard as you might imagine. I’ve done it four times in my life successfully. I’ve enjoyed the different careers at the time and I really was successful in each one. For me, there came a time to move on. Changing in this way has allowed me to come to terms with a changing economic environment and each new direction has built upon the experience and knowledge gained in the last one.

Checklist for Career Change is Part 1 of a three part series; In Part 2 (Link below) we consider how you can start building up a picture of your ideal job and find out which careers match it most closely. In Part 3 (Link below) we have a check list to help you decide whether you really should make the change

If you think a career change could benefit you, answering the following questions might help you to be clearer about your decision.

Are you actually enjoying your job, day by day?

If you’ve recently stopped enjoying the day-to-day activities in your job, consider why this may be. You may just be bored and need a new challenge in your present organization. You might think about moving to a different department. Or perhaps a change of employer might be the answer.

If you actively dislike parts of your day-to-day job, ask yourself whether what you do is typical for someone in your type of work. Do you dislike the job because you don’t get the chance to use all of your talents? If you’re dissatisfied with the job itself, changing department or employer may not improve things. You may want to consider a more radical change.

Do you feel motivated by the people you work with?

How do you get on with colleagues, managers, clients and others in your workplace? Are any problems due to personality clashes with particular people or is it the culture of your workplace or the nature of the job itself? Do you like the people you work with but are frustrated by the actual work? If so, you may want to look at changing your role within the organisation or looking for a different role with a similar employer.

Are you satisfied with your work-life balance?

If you’re looking for a better fit with your family life, a change of job isn’t always necessary.

Technology is making it possible for more people to spend time working from home. You may have the right to ask your employer to make arrangements for flexible working. Your employer can refuse if there’s a good business reason to do so. But employers are becoming much more willing to consider flexible working?

Is the time right for you to take the risk?

If you have, for example, family responsibilities and others economically dependent on you, then changing now may mean putting others at risk. Also, are you prepared to risk what you have invested in your present role and possible loss of status, perhaps only temporary, in moving into a new field? You need to be very honest with yourself and with other people who may be effected by the change you want to make. In changing careers, timing is all; when you are dealing with lots of other changes in your life, this change may not be right for you at this time.

Changing Careers – Part 2 Finding the right career to suit you

Changing Careers – Part 3 Deciding Whether To Make The Change – A Checklist

Help with career planning

If you need support form a coach in making a decision about a career change, please get in touch. I wish you every success in making your decision and, if it is right for you, making your career change.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

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Office Parties: Tips to help you manage the risks

Office Parties: Tips to help you manage the risks

Office parties! The coming office party season can create worries for both employers and employees. But it can be an event where you behave professionally and still have fun. It provides a great opportunity to socialize with co-workers and with manager that you wouldn’t normally mingle with and if you follow the advice below you should be able to handle the coming office party season with confidence and grace.

Office Parties – Tips

  1.  Prepare yourself mentally and accept that this is part of what is expected and it can be a good opportunity to meet new colleagues and your senior managers in a less formal environment. It provides a chance to network with new people. But it is probably a good idea to decide not to stay until the end before you go. Have a ready-made reason for leaving before people begin to really let their hair down and you are tempted to join in.  Make sure you stick to your resolution.
  2. Take care what you wear. Find out what everyone else is wearing before the party and match the tone with your outfit.  If you are a woman, find a compromise; you want to look attractive without being overtly sexy. Keep in mind the image you have worked so hard to build and don’t destroy it in a few short hours. For men,showing your more extreme eccentricities in dress is rarely a good idea.
  3. Arrive on time. Turning up ‘fashionably late’ is not really an option at a work event and it may get noticed. Plus arriving on time gives you the opportunity to say hello to everyone and socialize while people are still likely to remember the good impression you make. It means as well, you can get out early without seeming rude.
  4. Mingle. Be sure to acknowledge all your co-workers, your managers and other business contacts who are there. Don’t give anyone the opportunity to think you ignored them; the Christmas party is an excellent opportunity to cement relationships.
  5. Don’t “dis” the boss. Talk to your co-workers and others about work issues in a positive and complimentary light, focusing on achievements for the year and fun things you remember. Whatever negative thoughts you have, keep them out of this environment. It is easy to overhear things said in a crowd but to misunderstand, so don’t get drawn into listening to other’s negativity either, you may be assumed by others to agree. Instead don’t be frightened to talk to your co-workers and management about things outside of work such as the cinema, football, holidays, hobbies and family. And practice listening; this is as important as the small talk. Though it may feel really informal, remember it is still a work event; this isn’t the time to be speaking your mind informally to management.
  6. Drink responsibly. Keep in mind that everything observed has the potential to be turned into a judgement on your professionalism and work suitability. No matter how much management has insisted that everyone let down their hair, just don’t. Eat first before drinking. Drinking on an empty stomach is asking for trouble. Space all drinks with water and more food, and lots of conversation.
  7. Be discreet with about romantic intentions. Bear in mind the potential for claims of sexual harassment. Do not touch people in ways that can be misinterpreted, or say things that are considered demeaning or sexually provocative. Use your common sense. On the other hand, if you find yourself being hit on, even by your boss, and provided it is not grossly offensive, let them down gently. Try to preserve everyone’s dignity and remember co-workers will gossip as soon as they see anything happen. Don’t do anything you wouldn’t like to hear recounted in the office the next day.
  8. Help others. If you see a co-worker overdoing the drinking or making a move when they are clearly not fully mentally in charge of themselves, step in and bail them out. Explain to them tactfully what they are doing and how it appears to other people. If this doesn’t sink in, discreetly ring a cab and make sure they get home safely. This is a time when your executive decision-making can save their reputation.

If you follow the advice above you should be able to handle your coming office parties with confidence and grace.

I wish all those planning an office party every success and if I you need help to handle the after shock, please get in touch.

Remember I offer a trial free half hour coaching session by phone or Skype.

Warm regards

Wendy
wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com
http://wisewolfcoaching.com

  • Job Search: Make sure you include your personal profile/summary in your CV

Career Success:Assess; Live Within Your Budget

Live Within Your Budget! Today we have an article from Tamara M. Williams who loves learning about Career Development. She shares her knowledge and experiences in her articles.  She also writes articles for EzineArticles and Squidoo on topics such as Technology, Marketing and Entertainment.

Assess Your Work Expenses Every Month to Ensure That You Live Within Your Budget

Your work expenses are one aspect of your budget that you should be assessing every month. This means observing work-related expenses such as work attire and lunch to determine if there is a decrease or increase in your personal budget. Budgeting lets you know if you are living within your means.

Live Within Your Budget withWork Outfits

At various stages in your work year you might need to purchase work attire to keep up with your employer’s work culture. If uniform allowance is a part of your benefits package then this will greatly reduce your clothing expenses. Even with the allowance you might still be expected to wear your own clothes on Fridays so you still need to budget for this. You should also plan for additional clothes throughout the year for attending conferences, corporate functions and so on. Make a note of the items that you purchase by saving your receipts and adding them to your budget. You could ask family, friends and co-workers to suggest clothing stores that offer regular discounts, check newsletters that deliver sales alerts, and search on-line sites that offer coupons.

Live Within Your Budget with Lunch

Your lunch choices include brown bag lunches or purchasing meals from your local grocery stores, fast food joints, restaurants or company cafeterias. Packing your lunches from home is ideal because it costs less to purchase and prepare the meals yourself. However, if you don’t have the time then you should use one night to prepare enough lunches to last for a few days or just use your leftovers. This would reduce the amount of money you spend purchasing ready-made meals. When purchasing meals always check different locations to compare the costs and choose the most affordable options. You can also search on-line for recipes, coupons and discounts to save money. Keep all your receipts and track your spending each month.

Finally, sum up your purchases in each category above to determine how much money you spent for the month. Compare this to your previous budget. Determine if other areas of your personal budget can be adjusted to accommodate any extra expenses. If you are satisfied that you can live within your means, this is a great sign. However, if your expenses are cutting into your salary too much then ask family, friends and co-workers about the money-saving methods that they use. It is great earning a salary, but you want to ensure that you properly manage your personal finances. Live within your budget to ensure that you avoid debt and develop the discipline to save more money.

About The Author: Tamara M. Williams writes career articles based on her personal and work experience. She shares tips so that readers can learn more ways to develop their careers further. She also writes articles for EzineArticles and Squidoo on topics such as Technology, Marketing and Entertainment.

 

Career Development – Are You Holding Yourself Back?

Career Development – Are You Holding Yourself Back?

When it comes to meeting your full potential, how are you doing?  Are you as successful as you would like to be? No? Well lots of us unintentionally get in our own way.

There are lots of ways you could be blocking your own ability to succeed. Here are some questions to consider.;

  1. Are you overemphasizing your personal goals and position at the expense of your work group and your organization? Protecting your own position can limit your ability to take a wider view or to gain from group success. This approach is particularly limiting if your aspiration is to lead
  2. Are you obsessed with your personal image? Apart from alienating others, this can mean you avoid taking the risks necessary to achieve success.  Yes, you do need to protect your “personal brand” but not the point where it stops you talking a risk that might lead to a good opportunity. Be aware of the impact your personal brand, and how you protect it, is having on those about you.
  3. Do you see the competition as the enemy?  Hmm, that means you are not building the kind of alliances that might support you in the future.  Remember the old adage about keeping “enemies” close.  All well and good, but how about finding the common interest!
  4. Do you go it alone instead of looking for, and accepting, support and advice? At no stage in your career are you likely to know all you need to know. At no stage are you likely to be able to do it all alone.  Learn early to ask for, and accept, help gracefully and learn how to give in return
  5. Do you fear of failure?  Most winners have many years of the experience of being losers.  The trick is not to win every race but to learn from each failure and have the confidence to start again. How good at that are you?

So we’ve talked about being prepared to accept advice and help.  Here is an offer!  I’m a career coach and if you need my help, my contact details are below.

Wendy is the The Career Coach – helping you to find fresh perspectives on your Job Search and Career. She helps you work towards your goals and aspirations, in a way that fits in with both work and home life. Email her at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com,  find her on Skype at wendymason14, or call +44 (0) 2081239146 (02081239146 for UK callers) or +1 262 317 9016 if you are in the US.

Book a free trial/consultation to try phone coaching from the comfort of your own home and without risk. Don’t forget to ask about the Summer Special Offer 

Being Good At Your Job

Being Good At Your Job

“Being good at your job requires much more than just being smart. Success in any career, job, or even task requires more than mere intelligence. Certainly book smarts can help but career advancement requires many things such as perseverance, good communication skills, flexibility, adaptability, and most of all, experience. From my perspective nothing can replace experience and good judgment. Maybe it’s because I’m a risk manager. The best risk managers don’t just rely on quantitative models but draw upon their experience and differentiate themselves through their judgment.” Andrea Pozzi, Managing Director, Citigroup

From Andrea Pozzi: Five Messages to My Younger Self About Career Advancement

If you would like some help in developing your career skills please get in touch. Successful leaders are modest enough to know that working with a coach really can make a difference.

Wendy Mason is the The Career Coach – helping you to find fresh perspectives on your Job Search and Career. She helps you work towards your goals and aspirations, in a way that fits in with both work and home life. Email her at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com,  find her on Skype at wendymason14, or call +44 (0) 2081239146 (02081239146 for UK callers) or +1 262 317 9016 if you are in the US.

A free trial/consultation allows you to try phone coaching from the comfort of your own home and without risk. Don’t forget to ask about the Summer Special Offer 

 

 

Personality Tests and a Useful Free Resource

Personality Tests and a Useful Free Resource

Personality tests – a personality test is a questionnaire or other test designed to reveal aspects of your character or psychological makeup. They are used often by recruiters and by large organizations when making decisions about who to promote. But you can use these kind of tests yourself as part of your own career development and it always helps to know what recruiters may find.

The first personality tests were developed in 1920s and used by the armed forces. Since these early efforts, a variety of tests have been developed. Most notable are the Myers Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), the MMPI, and a number of tests based on the “Five Factor” Model of personality.

Today, personality tests have become a multi-million dollar industry and they can be used in a range of contexts. These can include individual and relationship counselling as well as career planning, and employee selection and development.

Below is a link to a free test is based on MBTI approach to personality. Upon completion of the questionnaire, you can find out your 4-letter type formula according to Carl Jung’s and Isabel Briggs Myers’ theories.  As well as that, you will find an indication of the strengths of your preferences and the description of your personality type.

After that, if you put your 4 letter type into a search engine you should find lots of relevant information and resources on-line. For example, I am INFJ which suggests among other things an aptitude for writing and counselling/coaching apparently. 

Anyway try the test and if you would like to discuss your results please get in touch. Here is the link http://www.humanmetrics.com/cgi-win/jtypes2.asp  

Wendy Mason is the The Career Coach – helping you to find fresh perspectives on your Job Search and Career. She helps you work towards your goals and aspirations, in a way that fits in with both work and home life. Email her at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com,  find her on Skype at wendymason14, or call +44 (0) 2081239146 (02081239146 for UK callers) or +1 262 317 9016 if you are in the US.

A free trial/consultation allows you to try phone coaching from the comfort of your own home and without risk. Don’t forget to ask about the Summer Special Offer