Career Development – Just Starting A New Job?

Career Development – Just Starting A New Job?

So you are one of the lucky ones. You did your homework, prepared well and wowed the interviewing panel. Now, you have what you wanted and you are about to start in a new position. So what will you do now to make this a success?

Making the perfect start in your new organization

What are those special things that you can do to make sure things turn out well?

Here are some tips;

  1. Get to know who counts in your new workplace. Who are the key decision makers? Make sure you know who needs to be kept on board
  2. Learn the culture of your new organization. Make sure you find out quickly how things get done. Every organization has its own particular style. Find out what it is here and how your personality and approach might fit in best.
  3. Work out for yourself some short term objectives and then work towards them – in due course make sure you agree the overall of objectives for your role with your new boss.
  4. Build up your connections and a new network of contacts, for example, colleagues, suppliers and customers; both within the organization and outside it.

Getting ahead in your new job

Even if you have only been in your job a little while, you will need to make you do not get stuck in a rut.

  1. You should explore the training and experience opportunities and make sure that you understand how appraisals are carried out. Does your organization have a career development program that you can join?
  2. Continue to nurture your network of contacts. Remember networks depend on reciprocity – what do you have to offer others.
  3. Think about how you can consolidate your position, make a contribution and then don’t wait till it is time to prepare for a move to think about what might come next.

Wendy Mason is a career coach.  She helps people reach their goals and aspirations, without sacrificing their home and personal life.  Before working as a coach, Wendy had a long career in both the public and private sectors in general management and consultancy as well as spells in HR.  She now divides her time between coaching and writing. You can contact Wendy at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com and find out more athttp://wisewolfcoaching.com

 

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Why "be the best" when you could be the one making the rules?

Here is an interesting and thought-provoking guest post on career development from Lindsey Harper Mac.  Lindsey is a professional writer living in the Indianapolis area. She specializes in writing guest posts on social media and education. Currently, Lindsey is completing work on her master’s degree.

Why “be the best” when you could be the one making the rules?

In the rat race that often develops among industry professionals vying to be regarded as reputable experts in their field, it’s easy to get fixated on goals. These lofty dreams of “being the best” are shared by many, to be sure, but they can also distort one’s perspective and lead a successful professional off their ideal path. That’s because, in many cases, professionals aren’t chasing a championship in their field so much as the trappings that come with it: higher wages, increased job security and greater career satisfaction.

But while not everyone can be the best at what they do, many can reap these benefits by keeping an open mind and considering alternative directions as their career progresses. When most people talk about making a career change, that decision is the product of discontent, job loss, or both. Few people make it through the course of their careers without changing direction at least once. Exploring these different options is healthy for anyone, prompting contemplative thought about what, exactly, they want to do with their lives.

By exploring a purposeful career transition from a specialty field to the business side of operations, professionals can build upon their existing education and expertise earned over the course of their career. Instead of throwing away one’s professional background to pursue new lines of work, a transition into business could apply a unique skill set to a new market.

Hitting the ceiling on specialized career paths

Applying a specialized skill set in an equally specialized work setting can be fulfilling, but it comes with challenges. In more specialized fields, professionals face the continued challenge of evolving as the industry changes in order to maintain their current standing. This requires professionals to continue learning and growing in order to remain relevant in the job market.

And even the job market itself can be uncertain, tethered to the whims of consumers, businesses or even industry changes that threaten to render current practices useless. In these relatively narrow professional tracts, it can be hard to continue to advance through the ranks. Those who often find themselves stagnating in a position that fails to challenge them often have additional burden of few incentives for advancement.

A potentially rewarding alternative is to leave the specialty behind and instead use those experiences to market and manage operations from the business end. In this century, focused, life-long learning comes into play when selecting the type of education courses that best serve your next career goals.

Proactively transitioning to boost your influence — and your job stability

Behind every specialized industry, there is a business element helping it thrive. These functions can vary widely, from marketing to management to human resources and beyond. A familiarity with the various specializations of a given industry can be very valuable in this environment. It also provides more control – and ultimately – power to the individual professional.

Instead of working at the whims of the marketplace and hoping to keep up and excel, professionals working on the business end can have a hand in those big decisions. By directing these operations, business personnel can directly affect how the job market progresses and how the dynamics of the industry shape the demands placed on professionals working in specialty fields.

Finally, the functions of the business end are so varied and expansive that opportunity is far more abundant. By exiting a narrow, refined line of work to one allowing professionals to easily transition within itself and advance to new levels, any professional can continue to work knowing that a sizable carrot is dangling out in front of them. The motivation and satisfaction is priceless when it comes to being happy in one’s line of work. And that happiness far outweighs any pride pursuit of reaching the top of the career pyramid.

About the author: Lindsey Harper Mac is a professional writer living in the Indianapolis area. She specializes in writing guest posts on social media and education. Currently, Lindsey is completing work on her master’s degree.

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Starting a New Job – What You Can Do Before Your First Day?

Starting a New Job – What You Can Do Before Your First Day?

By Dawn Rosenberg McKay, a career planning professional with two decades of experience.

Shortly before my daughter started kindergarten a few years ago we visited the school she was going to attend. She and the other children who were to be starting school with her visited the kindergarten classrooms, met each teacher, and participated in activities. This was my daughter’s first “first,” or at least her first significant one. Many more will follow, like someday in the distant future, her first day on a new job.

It’s really not much different actually, except there probably won’t be a formal orientation like the one my daughter had. And when you start a new job you’re generally not in the company of others who are also new. Oh no. You’re the new kid on the block coming into a situation where relationships have already been formed. You’re the only one who can’t find the restroom, doesn’t know where the supply room and mail room are located, doesn’t yet realize that the custodian wields all the real power, and doesn’t know not to talk to the boss until she’s had her first cup of coffee. There’s so much to learn in addition to the duties related to the job you were hired for. It’s quite overwhelming for most of us.

You can read the rest of this post with some great advice at this link

Starting A New Job

Starting A New Job

Career Development – Starting A New Job

Starting a new job – congratulations – you did your homework, prepared well and starting a new jobwowed the interviewing panel. You have what you wanted and you are about to start in a new position. So what will you do now to make this a success?

Making the perfect start in your new organization

What are those special things that you can do to make sure things turn out well?

Here are some tips;

  1. Make sure you get to know who really counts in your new workplace. Who are the key decision makers? Make sure you know who needs to be kept on board. Remember, there will be people of influence at all levels in your organisation and courtesy to all is going to make a good impression.
  2. Learn the culture of your new organization. Make sure you find out quickly how things get done. Every organization has its own particular style and language. Take time to find out what goes where you are now. How will your personality and approach best fit in best. Be prepared to adapt.
  3. Work out for yourself some short-term objectives and then work towards them – in due course make sure you agree at least the overall of objectives for your role with your new boss. Make sure you understand how your performance will be judges.
  4. Build up your connections and a new network of contacts, for example, colleagues, suppliers and customers; both within the organization and outside it. Build good relationships with all from your first day.
  5. On that first day, arrive in good time. Dress for success in the style of your new organisation. Polish those shoes. Make sure clothes are clean and well pressed.
  6. Now take a deep breath, put a smile on your face and do well!

Getting ahead in your new job

Once you have made a start, it is time to plan for the future!

  1. Find out how appraisals are carried out and explore the training and experience opportunities and make sure that you t. Does your organization have a career development program that you can join?
  2. Continue to nurture your network of contacts. Remember networks depend on reciprocity – what do you have to offer others.
  3. Think about how you can consolidate your position and make a real contribution to your organisation.
  4. Then don’t wait till it is time to prepare for a move to think about what might come next.
Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link