How To Get Promoted Part 2

How To Get Promoted Part 2

Career Development – Get that Promotion; Part 2

How To Get Promoted – are you doing well in your present role but feel ready Get Promotedfor the next step up? Even in this tough economic climate some people are still managing to get promotion. But how do you make yourself part of that élite group? This is the second in a two post series.  Here is a link to Part 1 – link

How To Get Promoted – Last week I suggested that you should;

  • Create a portfolio of work you have done, showing your value to the organization,
  • Volunteer for more responsibility,
  • Create your own opportunity,
  • Let your ambition show but with discretion,
  • Ask for a private meeting to discuss properly how you are doing.
  • Now here are a further six tips to help you on your way.

Take a deep breath and blow your own trumpet

It is OK to do so if you know the notes to play. You can afford to brag a little, but with care. It doesn’t hurt to remind your boss of your accomplishments. Bosses are human and they do forget things; it helps if you can prompt and do it with facts and figures. Saying you are the Greatest may raise some laughs but that kind of bragging won’t make the kind of impression you want. If you have reduced costs or made some other improvement – quote the numbers. Make sure you concentrate on what is good about your performance, putting down someone else’s performance to make you look good isn’t impressive.

Blackmail doesn’t usually work

Avoid threats and demands. Making your boss squirm is not going to make them want to go out of their way to help you. Threatening to leave will not make your boss think better of you. Using it as blackmail can rebound and lead to doubts about your loyalty. Stay calm and if you feel frustrated, try not to show it.

Have friends in high places

Mentors further up the line are always valuable. If you can get someone on your side before you ask for promotion, it offers great benefits. You will be better informed about what life is like higher up. And it will show your boss you are serious about getting on. It gives you informal influence (outside the organization chart) and it will give you a friendly ear if things get a little tough.

Shine in your present post

Your present role gives you the opportunity to show what you can do. Push it as far as you can – go the extra mile. Work out what excellence really means in the job you do and make that the standard! Beat the deadlines and make a reputation for solving problems. That way you become someone who everyone wants on their team and they can see what an asset you will be at a more senior level. But don’t be personally indispensable. Build a structure that means the your team can function well without you, but make sure people know that it is your team. That way your boss won’t be so scared of losing you that they block your promotion.

Model more senior behaviour

Note how senior people in your organization behave. How do they talk, behave and think? Pick someone you admire and respect. Now use them as a role model. Start to behave in the way that you would like to be perceived.

Keep learning

Take every opportunity to learn more about your field, your profession and the organization in which you work. It will better equip you for a more senior role and it will also impress your boss. It will show that you are serious. About promotion. You will find lots of self-study material on-line which makes it a little easier to combine study with full-time work. No, it isn’t easy to study when you are working but if it is a real investment in you.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

How To Get Promoted

How To Get Promoted

Career Development – Get that Promotion; Part 1

How To Get Promoted – are you doing well in your present role but feel ready How To Get Promotedfor the next step up? Even in this tough economic climate some people are still managing to get promotion. But how do you make yourself part of that élite group? This is the first in a two post series – here is the link to the second post – link.

Create Your Portfolio

Lots of people simply work away at the job – just getting on with it. They deliver lots of good things but they keep a very low profile and no one notices. Make sure you can prove the results you have achieved and make sure the right people know about them. Put together a portfolio of the work you have done, showing your value to the organization.

Put in the numbers. Show how, and by how much, you have helped the organization. Prepare a presentation based on your portfolio and ask your boss for the opportunity to show it to them. This is particularly useful when you want your boss to sponsor you for a promotion – you need to give your boss the facts they need to support your case. If you want them to fight for you, you need to give them the ammunition.

Volunteer for more responsibility

Tell your boss you are ready, willing and able to take on more responsibility. Show how you would set about dealing with a more diverse workload. Make clear that it isn’t the status you will relish, but the work itself. Give your boss the opportunity to give you new and different tasks. Then, when you have built your tasks up to well exceed your job specification, prove it and show your boss what you are achieving. Now, ask for recognition in terms of your boss supporting your bid for promotion.

Create your own opportunity

Can you see an opportunity in your organization;  a potential role that no one else has thought about.  Can you show how it could help the organization and pay for itself. Is it a role that you can fill? Put the case together and have the confidence to ask to present it. Even if they don’t follow-up your ideas, you will win points for ingenuity and creativity, plus you will have demonstrated loyalty to the organization.

Let your ambition show, but with discretion

Don’t be afraid to let them know you are ambitious but do it with care. Here is an example. Do your team meet up with the boss outside the workplace? This can give you an opportunity to let your boss know about your ambitions. But you need to do it with sensitivity. People are more receptive over a drink or a meal, particularly if they are very task focussed in the office. Use this time with discretion. If you press too hard, you could make your boss and yourself feel uncomfortable. And don’t make your boss themselves feel threatened. Make it light and back off if you sense what you are saying isn’t going down well.

Ask for a private meeting

If you and your boss are really busy then trying to talk about promotion while you are working isn’t going to have the effect you want. And you need time to set out your case. Ask to set a block of time to one side to talk but don’t say specifically that you want to talk about promotion. Don’t make it too mysterious though – it is reasonable to ask for some time to talk properly about how you are doing. If you can, do your best to make sure all goes well at work in the hours before your meeting.

You can find Part 2 of Get That Promotion at this link

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

Performance Reviews: Painful or Helpful?

Performance Reviews: Painful or Helpful?

Performance Reviews: Painful or Helpful? Today our guest blogger, Lindsey Harper Mac, presents the third and last in her new series of posts on career development.   Lindsey is a professional writer living in the Indianapolis area. She specializes in writing guest posts on social media and education. Currently, Lindsey is completing work on her master’s degree. You can find the first post in this series at this link – Career Development Part 1 – Why Get An Advanced Degree? The Answer is Obvious and the second at this link –  Career Development Part 2: Want a Promotion? Focus on Factors Within your Control

Career Development Part 3: Performance Reviews: Painful or Helpful?

For many employees, receiving a performance review isn’t a welcome occurrence. It can seem that bosses are being tedious and trying to catch their workers messing up on the job when these reviews are compiled and delivered. In truth, however, an employee review is intended to be a useful tool in promoting employee growth. When done properly, performance reviews should highlight areas of strength and weakness and provide a roadmap for future growth. To better understand the employee review process, consider all the factors that go into a comprehensive employee review.

Work Monitoring

The most notable-–and commonly most nerve tweaking-–part of any employee review is the work-monitoring segment. During this part of the review process, the employer evaluates the worker while he’s on the job and makes note of strengths and weaknesses. In some cases, the worker knows he’s being monitored; in others, the worker is unaware, ensuring that the employer has an accurate picture of the worker’s performance on a day-to-day basis.

Performance History Review

Employers also often review the employee’s history of performance, checking accuracy percentages, sales figures or other numbers indicative of the employee’s level of on-the-job success. By consulting this information, the employer can ensure that, if the work monitoring didn’t yield stellar results, his negative opinion isn’t simply the result of one not-so-hot day on the job.

Collaboration

Employers often collaborate with different individuals within the managerial or HR departments when completing these employee reviews. In doing so, they share their findings and ask the individuals with whom they’re collaborating to reflect upon the data as well. This can go a long way toward ensuring that the overall opinion of the worker’s effectiveness isn’t solely determined by one individual.

Goal Setting

After gathering all the information required to make informed decisions, managers commonly set some goals for what they’d like to see the employee achieve in the next several months or over the course of the next year. They may decide they want to see improved accuracy from an employee whose percentages were found wanting. For an employee they’d like to see advance within the company, they may encourage her to make efforts toward reaching educational goals or obtaining further professional credentials.

Employee Input

After these steps, the employer presents the painstakingly gathered information to the employee. Often, the employee is asked to provide input at this point as well. This could be an explanation of an area that appeared to be weak but is actually stronger than the numbers would suggest. During this portion of the review, the employee is commonly presented with the goals set for her and asked to edit them or agree to them if she feels they’re reasonable.

When employers review their employees’ work, they hope to find these workers are doing everything perfectly. When this isn’t the case, managers can use the information they glean from this careful monitoring of performance to help their employees grow and become better workers within their selected industries. This facilitation of growth is mutually beneficial, as it allows employers to craft stronger workforces and it allows employees to become the best workers they can be.

About the author: Lindsey Harper Mac is a professional writer living in the Indianapolis area. She specializes in writing guest posts on social media and education. Currently, Lindsey is completing work on her master’s degree.

Also by Lindsey Harper Mac

Career Development Part 1 – Why Get An Advanced Degree? The Answer is Obvious

Career Development Part 2: Want a Promotion? Focus on Factors Within your Control

Entrepreneurs Growing Forward

Why “be the best” when you could be the one making the rules? | WiseWolf Talking – the WiseWolf Coaching Blog.

The Makings of a Great Leader | WiseWolf Talking – the WiseWolf Coaching Blog.

 

Want a Promotion?

Want a Promotion?

Want a Promotion?  Today our guest blogger Lindsey Harper Mac presents the second in her new series of posts on career development.  The third, and last, post will appear here next week .  Lindsey is a professional writer living in the Indianapolis area. She specializes in writing guest posts on social media and education. Currently, Lindsey is completing work on her master’s degree. You can find the first post in this series at this link – Career Development Part 1 – Why Get An Advanced Degree? The Answer is Obvious

Career Development Part 2: Want a Promotion? Focus on Factors Within your Control

Want a Promotion? Whether or not you get that long-dreamed-about promotion isn’t dependent on one or two easily manipulated factors. Instead, it relies upon a mishmash of influences, both business and employee-related. The business-related elements are ones that are specific to your business environment and ones over which you have less control. The employee-related factors are ones that you can manipulate and, in doing so, potentially increase your chances of obtaining the promotion you seek.

Want a Promotion? Business Factors

  • Your Boss – The degree to which you get along with your boss can play a major part in determining whether or not you find yourself in line for a promotion. If you and your boss get along famously, he’ll be more likely to recommend you for advancement should the opportunity present itself. If, on the other hand, you clash constantly, your name will likely not be at the top of the list when it’s time for him to recommend someone for a promotion.
  • Business Success – Management will be more likely to promote more workers if your specific company is going through a period of profitability. As businesses succeed, they also commonly expand, meaning more underlings are needed to do the work–and, of course, more leaders are needed to guide the company’s inner workings.
  • Industry Growth – Getting a promotion is often easier in a rapidly growing industry. If you happen to work in a field that’s going through a period of growth, you may find that more upper-level positions are being created to meet the increased demands. This growth is something you can capitalize on.
  • Retirements – If you happen to step into the world of work when others are preparing to step out, you may be able to obtain a promotion more quickly. As others retire and vacate their positions, you may find yourself serendipitously able to climb the ladder without having to shove off others already occupying the higher rungs.

Want a Promotion? Employee Factors

  • Education – The more you know and the more credentials you hold, the more obvious a choice you seem for a promotion. If you don’t have education in your specific industry, you may be able to better position yourself for advancement by completing an online education program or attending seminars in a topic that relates to your field.
  • Experience – The experience you bring to the table will make a major difference in determining whether or not you get a promotion. If you come to the position already holding years of experience, you’ll be a logical candidate for promotion. If you aren’t lucky enough to bring this experience with you, enhance your credibility by volunteering to take part in advanced projects or complete duties that may technically be above your current level.
  • Enthusiasm – If you attend work every day, do the minimum and go home, your boss probably won’t reward you with a promotion. The degree of enthusiasm you show is something management will note. If you can be more enthusiastic and eager, you can make yourself seem more dedicated to your business and deserving of a promotion.

Moving up in the corporate world isn’t always within your control. You can, however, take the helm and control the elements of promotability that you can change to ensure these controllable factors don’t stand in the way of that job you wish to hold.

About the author: Lindsey Harper Mac is a professional writer living in the Indianapolis area. She specializes in writing guest posts on social media and education. Currently, Lindsey is completing work on her master’s degree.

Also by Lindsey Harper Mac

Career Development Part 1 – Why Get An Advanced Degree? The Answer is Obvious

Entrepreneurs Growing Forward

Why “be the best” when you could be the one making the rules? | WiseWolf Talking – the WiseWolf Coaching Blog.

The Makings of a Great Leader | WiseWolf Talking – the WiseWolf Coaching Blog.

 

Why “be the best” when you could be the one making the rules?

Here is an interesting and thought-provoking guest post on career development from Lindsey Harper Mac.  Lindsey is a professional writer living in the Indianapolis area. She specializes in writing guest posts on social media and education. Currently, Lindsey is completing work on her master’s degree.

Why “be the best” when you could be the one making the rules?

In the rat race that often develops among industry professionals vying to be regarded as reputable experts in their field, it’s easy to get fixated on goals. These lofty dreams of “being the best” are shared by many, to be sure, but they can also distort one’s perspective and lead a successful professional off their ideal path. That’s because, in many cases, professionals aren’t chasing a championship in their field so much as the trappings that come with it: higher wages, increased job security and greater career satisfaction.

But while not everyone can be the best at what they do, many can reap these benefits by keeping an open mind and considering alternative directions as their career progresses. When most people talk about making a career change, that decision is the product of discontent, job loss, or both. Few people make it through the course of their careers without changing direction at least once. Exploring these different options is healthy for anyone, prompting contemplative thought about what, exactly, they want to do with their lives.

By exploring a purposeful career transition from a specialty field to the business side of operations, professionals can build upon their existing education and expertise earned over the course of their career. Instead of throwing away one’s professional background to pursue new lines of work, a transition into business could apply a unique skill set to a new market.

Hitting the ceiling on specialized career paths

Applying a specialized skill set in an equally specialized work setting can be fulfilling, but it comes with challenges. In more specialized fields, professionals face the continued challenge of evolving as the industry changes in order to maintain their current standing. This requires professionals to continue learning and growing in order to remain relevant in the job market.

And even the job market itself can be uncertain, tethered to the whims of consumers, businesses or even industry changes that threaten to render current practices useless. In these relatively narrow professional tracts, it can be hard to continue to advance through the ranks. Those who often find themselves stagnating in a position that fails to challenge them often have additional burden of few incentives for advancement.

A potentially rewarding alternative is to leave the specialty behind and instead use those experiences to market and manage operations from the business end. In this century, focused, life-long learning comes into play when selecting the type of education courses that best serve your next career goals.

Proactively transitioning to boost your influence — and your job stability

Behind every specialized industry, there is a business element helping it thrive. These functions can vary widely, from marketing to management to human resources and beyond. A familiarity with the various specializations of a given industry can be very valuable in this environment. It also provides more control – and ultimately – power to the individual professional.

Instead of working at the whims of the marketplace and hoping to keep up and excel, professionals working on the business end can have a hand in those big decisions. By directing these operations, business personnel can directly affect how the job market progresses and how the dynamics of the industry shape the demands placed on professionals working in specialty fields.

Finally, the functions of the business end are so varied and expansive that opportunity is far more abundant. By exiting a narrow, refined line of work to one allowing professionals to easily transition within itself and advance to new levels, any professional can continue to work knowing that a sizable carrot is dangling out in front of them. The motivation and satisfaction is priceless when it comes to being happy in one’s line of work. And that happiness far outweighs any pride pursuit of reaching the top of the career pyramid.

About the author: Lindsey Harper Mac is a professional writer living in the Indianapolis area. She specializes in writing guest posts on social media and education. Currently, Lindsey is completing work on her master’s degree.

  • Career Development – Continuing Education – The Key to Professional Growth

  • Job Search When You Are In Work – Career Development in a Cold Climate

Career Development – do you have the right qualities to get promoted even in a recession?

Right now most people are focused just on keeping their jobs.  They are not thinking about going for promotion.  But this is the time when more leadership and creativity is needed than ever before, just to keep businesses afloat.

If you have the the right qualities, prepare well and have just a little bit of luck, this could be your moment! Now is the time to;

  • Be the one that volunteers for the difficult task.
  • Make clear that you are prepared to take on more responsibility.
  • Where you see a problem looming, be the one who comes up with a solution –
  • Be  there with new and ingenious ways to cut costs
  • Have ideas for new niches
  • Have new skills if they are required
  • Prove what you can do!

Make sure the boss knows you are thinking about the organization, not just yourself!  But when you do something new or extra make sure your boss does know about it.  If it’s not possible to give you a raise now, then can you negotiate something for when things improve – get it on the record!  Can you tie how much you receive to that improvement with your present pay as a fall-back?

Go for it!  You’ve got nothing to lose and at the very worst you will be someone they want to keep around – right now that is a bonus.  Good Luck!

This is a new version of a post that appeared a while ago on this blog – I thought it was a subject worth of a re-post

Starting a New Job – What You Can Do Before Your First Day?

Starting a New Job – What You Can

Do Before Your First Day?

By Dawn Rosenberg McKay, a career planning professional with two decades of experience.

Shortly before my daughter started kindergarten a few years ago we visited the school she was going to attend. She and the other children who were to be starting school with her visited the kindergarten classrooms, met each teacher, and participated in activities. This was my daughter’s first “first,” or at least her first significant one. Many more will follow, like someday in the distant future, her first day on a new job.

It’s really not much different actually, except there probably won’t be a formal orientation like the one my daughter had. And when you start a new job you’re generally not in the company of others who are also new. Oh no. You’re the new kid on the block coming into a situation where relationships have already been formed. You’re the only one who can’t find the restroom, doesn’t know where the supply room and mail room are located, doesn’t yet realize that the custodian wields all the real power, and doesn’t know not to talk to the boss until she’s had her first cup of coffee. There’s so much to learn in addition to the duties related to the job you were hired for. It’s quite overwhelming for most of us.

You can read the rest of this post with some great advice at this link

Finding a Career that Fits

Electrician

Today we have a guest post written by Lincoln Group of Schools. They offer a variety of career training to those focused on finding a career path. Explore their range of offerings from electrician courses to HVAC training.

Finding a career that really fits who you are and what you love to do can be very challenging. It’s much easier to simply get a job that pays the bills and resign yourself to not enjoying your work every day. However, you can make a different choice. With a little thought and research, you can find a career that matches your personality and passion. When you enjoy your job each day, it may not even feel like work! Below are some steps you can take to find a career path that best matches you.

Believe that change can happen. The first step to getting out of a career rut is to truly believe that change is possible. While it may not be as easy or direct as ‘do what you love and the money will follow,’ there are career paths that are a good match for your talents, skills, and passions. It is worth the effort to find out what you love and to try to do that in your daily work. Life is too precious to waste simply working for the weekends and the paycheck. Believe that more is possible, and move toward it.

Know yourself. As the philosophers say, the first step to wisdom is understanding yourself. Take some time and think about the things that you truly enjoy. Think about when you were a child, and remember what you dreamed about being when you grew up. Many of our dreams get discarded as we get lost in the routine of daily life, but they can be retrieved. Take a piece of paper and brainstorm everything you think you would love to do. Don’t edit at this stage, just write it all down. This is the first step to finding out what’s inside your heart and what you truly enjoy.

After you’ve written down your dreams, take another piece of paper and write down all of your skills and qualifications. This may include formal education, or it may include skills you’ve gained in your home or work, such as organization, multi-tasking, or computer skills.

Match your passions to careers. There are many online surveys that will help you understand your interests and show you what careers work well with those tendencies. In addition, you can simply research the careers that occur to you as you review your dreams and desires from your brainstorming session. In the United States, a comprehensive list of careers and industries is available on the Bureau of Labor and Statistics website, in their Occupational Handbook.

Get further training if needed. While you may find that you have a lot of the skills needed for your new career, you are more likely to discover that you need additional education or training. Did that long-lost love of animals resurface, and now you’re considering being a veterinarian? Look for the best training program that meets your budget and lifestyle needs. Online training is increasingly available, but be sure that the training meets the standards of the companies that hire in that field.

Finding the career you truly love is not an easy task, but it is well worth the effort. It is possible to enjoy your work on a daily basis, and having a rewarding career is so much more important than simply bringing home a paycheck. Working in the field that fits you best will bring increased joy, satisfaction, and peace to your life – you’ll know that you really are doing what you were meant to do.

This post written by Lincoln Group of Schools. They offer a variety of career training to those focused on finding a career path. Explore their range of offerings from electrician courses to HVAC training.

>Help for people leaving the Public Sector

>

  
This blog has been established to provide advice and support for people thinking about leaving the UK Public Sector!

Following the 2010 Spending Review it was revealed that between them UK Government departments were expected to shed over 100,000 civil service posts as part of their efforts to reduce administration costs.
  
The Government’s cull of quangos, in which 192 public bodies are to be abolished and a further 112 will be merged, will also contribute to an overall headcount loss in the civil service
In addition vast numbers of posts are likely to be lost from the wider public sector – Local Authorities, the NHS etc
.
Many public servants have already been invited to consider taking voluntary redundancy, and many more will be invited to do so as reorganisation plans begin to take shape. 
Compulsory redundancies cannot be ruled out.
For many public servants this is a time to consider the future and the challenge it presents.
Four years ago I was facing the same challenge.
I left the Civil Service in May 2007 and despite the changing economic climate I have not had one moment of regret!  
Since then, as a coach, I have worked with a number of other people leaving public service.  This blog has been started to share the learning and to help you make the most the time ahead.
Posts will usually appear on Tuesday and Thursday.
The aim will be
  • to give you honest advice about the realities of life outside
  • to support you in making your plans 
  • to help you carry them through!
It will also be a place for you to express your views, if you wish, in the form of comments and to ask questions!






Wendy Mason is a performance, programme, contract management and change specialist. She works as a consultant, business coach and blogger. Adept at problem solving, she is a great person to bring in when that one thing you thought was straightforward turns out not to be! If you have a problem talk to Wendy – she can help you – email her at wendymason@wisewolfconsulting.com or ring ++44(0)7867681439