Making Changes – Defining Change

Making Changes – Defining Change

Making Changes – part 2 of the series. Be Clear About The Change You Want!Defining change

Defining Change – Making Changes is series of posts about how to make positive changes in your personal or professional life that really work . So, I hope it helps you. Perhaps, you have comments, or would like further help? If so, my email address is at the bottom of the article.

In the last post in this series  I discussed the need to face reality,  admit that a change is needed and take responsibility for action.  Now is the time to be quite clear about what you need to change.

Be as specific and detailed as you can in the way you define the change. Starting with a clear and detailed description is important. If you don’t really know what you want, you can find yourself very disappointed after you made the change.

Defining change – tips!

Here are some tips to help you and define change and be clear about the problem you are trying to solve.

  1. Start with what you know now! Write down as much as possible about the thing you want to change, why you want to make a change and how you plan to make it.
  2. Consider what other information you might need. What gaps are there in your knowledge about the change you want to make. Do you understand completely how you are going to make the change and what the full effects might be?  For example, will other people be effected?  Do you need their support in making the change and are you likely to get it? How much time and money will it cost to do it and do you have those resources available?  Does making this change mean you will need to make others – what will they be?
  3. Collect the information you need.  This could include both facts and the opinions of others about the change you plan.  Don’t be afraid to ask for help. What has been their experience in making a similar change – what has worked for them and what has not?  Try to gather as much information as you can.

Now you are ready to define the change you want to make.

If you have gone through the steps above, you are ready to set down in detail what your change is and how you want to make it.  Write it down and make it as clear, colorful and detailed as you can.

The next post in this series is going to cover handling emotions when making changes in our lives. No significant change is made without some impact on our emotions and knowing how to manage that impact can be key to success.

I would love to hear your experiences in making changes in your life

Working with a coach can help you to change successfully – email me at the address below for information on how I can help you.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

The earlier post in this series

Making Changes – First, Admit A Change is Needed

Making Changes – Admit A Change is Needed

Making Changes – part 1 of the series. First, admit you need a change.Making Changes

Making Changes is series of posts about how to make positive changes in your personal or professional life that really work . So, I hope it helps you. Perhaps, you have comments, or would like further help? If so, my email address is at the bottom of the article.

Change happens

Making changes – yes, change is inevitable. And, you can’t avoid it, but sometimes we do our best to try!  At the end of the day, though, we all get caught up in it.  If you look back at your own life, and your career, you will know that this is true.

Some change is positive and some negative. But change is inevitable. So how do you make the most of it for you, your family and your career?

Facing reality

The secret is to recognize and truly acknowledge when a change is needed. Often it is hardest to admit to yourself when that change needs to be made within you.  Start to watch  and listen to the world around you and how those about you are responding. How do they respond to you? How have things changed? If they have changed, how are you going to respond? The world is changing constantly. So make scanning your horizons a regular part of your routine.

At home and at work

At home make sure you take time to really listen to those about you including close friends. It is all too easy to get into a busy routine that leaves no time to really talk to others outside of work. So, when you ask questions about how they are feeling, be ready to listen fully to an honest answer. And, give them time and space to fully express themselves while you take time to work out how best to respond.  Staying tuned-in is an important part of maintaining healthy relationships. If a relationship isn’t healthy, be ready to take the steps necessary to put things right

At work, ask your boss for feedback about your performance if it isn’t volunteered. Begin to see how others are working now. Listen to what your boss and your colleagues are saying about the future. Read the professional and trade journals for your sector and take part in your professional organization. Keep in touch on the internet with others in your market place through organisations like LinkedIn.

Making changes – admit you need a change.

Before you make a change, you need to truly acknowledge and accept you need one. Sometimes, it will be about something within yourself or the way you act.  Are you doing all you can to keep your relationships healthy?Are you fully meeting the needs of your job as it is now,  It is all too easy to assume everything has stayed the same. The reality is that probably it hasn’t. But of  course many of the changes may be for the better. How best to respond is really up to you.

Admitting you have a weakness is painful.  It is far more comfortable to blame your partner, the boss, your colleagues or your friends. It is easier to make excuses and rationalize the situation, than admit to things as they are really and begin making changes.

Making Changes – taking the first steps

Facing reality,  admitting there is a problem and taking responsibility for action set up the conditions needed for a successful change.  They are your first steps in making changes.

Look out for the next post in this series. It will be about being clear about the change required.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

 

How to handle a jealous boss

How to handle a jealous boss

Bosses, like all of us, come with a range of human emotions and one how to handle a jealous bossof them may be jealousy.  Given the number of visits to this post, I guess a lot of people think their boss might be jealous. So here is some advice on how to handle a jealous boss.

Jealousy is usually shown in quite subtle ways in the early stages.

How jealousy might be shown;

  • Have you been relegated to the dreary corner?
  • Do you always seem to be given the most boring work?
  • Are you often given just too much work?
  • May be, you are subject to sarcastic comments?
  • Your manager might just find fault with everything you do?
  • Or start to niggle away at a few small faults you do have?

If some of these apply to you, you need to know how to handle a jealous boss.

Steps to take!

how to handle a jealous boss
Wendy has a concise and practical eBook on how to get on better with your boss. You can find it at this link http://amzn.to/2mshlVJ

First, directly confronting a jealous boss rarely works. Go carefully, particularly if you need to keep the job. It is sad, but in most organisations, unless there is a clear case of bullying, reporting your boss rarely turns out well. The benefit of the doubt will usually be given to the more senior party. Calling on the support of senior contacts against your boss might well rebound. They may not thank you for the information. They may value your boss for his/her technical abilities and your boss may have an otherwise good record.

Hard as it sound, the best approach is usually to make your boss feel you are on their side. They need to believe that, even though you might have it in you to upstage them, you will never do so. They need to feel that you really will support them.

Show your boss that you respect their ability. And ask for their advice. It might be difficult for you at first because you feel that you too are an expert. But it will help to build your relationship.

Make sure you try to make your boss look good. Be ready to share your ideas. Accept that sometimes your ideas might be presented as theirs.  If you have contacts higher up the office, be ready to share them with your boss. And, if your boss has unsung talents, make sure your senior contacts know about them.

If you do find yourself relegated to the dreary corner, see what you can do to brighten things up. In most kinds of work, there is some opportunity to make a positive mark if you look for it.

Remember though if jealousy turns into out-and-out bullying there are legal steps you can take to seek redress.

Overall!

Keep your dignity but turn yourself into an asset for your boss, and not a threat.

There has been a lot of interest in this subject and I’ve received lot a of questions. So, I’ve written a concise and practical eBook on how to get on with the boss. In it you will learn how to make a great first and lasting impression at work. You will find out how to help your boss help you. Don’t be made unhappy, suffer stress and lose confidence because you cannot get on with the person in charge. Poor relationships at work can damage life at home as well as your career. There can be long-term effects on health and on your motivation.  My little eBook can really help you avoid the pitfalls and build a strong, positive, relationship with your boss. There is more on the eBook below but here is a quick link http://amzn.to/2mshlVJ

How To Get On With The Boss covers;

•What it means to get on with the boss
•Why it matters
•How to know whether you get on with your boss
•Getting it right
•What your boss really wants
•How requirements can change over time
•Making a good first impression
•Keeping respect once you are experienced in the role
•What to do when things go wrong
•Bosses with problems
•Demon bosses
•Putting things right
•Moving on when it is time to go
•Bullying

Here is a link to the book

And if you would like a coach to support you as you deal with your boss, please get in touch.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written also written a little book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

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What Makes A Good Boss – Quotes

What Makes A Good Boss

Quotes – What Makes A Good Boss

What Makes A Good Boss – some quotes to help you decide!

A good boss makes people realize they have more ability than they think they have so that they consistently do better work than they thought they could. Charles Erwin Wilson

One of the great things we do is recognize people. Those things are greatly appreciated by family and friends and colleagues. It’s so hard to define every certain instance. We have to use our own good judgement. Carl Persis

A good boss is a person who can tolerate my complaints and still manage to say hello to me every day. Byron Pusifer

My boss… always stands by me if I get in trouble. He always stands by my decisions. He is very polite and intelligent. Kristina Smulkstyte

She encourages her staff to participate in decisions that affect the workplace and come up with ideas to make things run more efficiently – and then turns those ideas into practice. She has an almost magical ability to get people to “go beyond” and do more than the job requires. Anon

He makes others feel valued and appreciated. He enjoys helping others become better people and better employees. He does not jump to conclusions; he gets all the facts and lets it simmer before taking any action. He listens to everybody’s input on the company and reminds us it’s our company too. Anon

I really want to know what they need from me …. not all employees need the same things from their manager. Susan M. Heathfield

Keep your own office door open most of the time, but respect your employees’ need for privacy when busy or with clients. Anon

Developing and sustaining self-awareness ought to be at the top of the list for every boss. Anon

In most cases being a good boss means hiring talented people and then getting out of their way. Tina Fey

 

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

How To Get On With The Boss

How To Get On With The Boss

How To Get On With The Boss – are you having difficulties getting on with the person in charge at work? Lots of people seem have problems with bosses. For one reason or another they can’t get on with them. But bosses How To Get On With The Bosshave a huge impact over as large parts of your daily life. And unhappiness and stress at work usually leaks out to affect the rest of your life.

Bosses are human! If you’re lucky they will be understanding, supportive, encouraging and inspiring. But, being human, they will probably have at least one characteristic that makes them difficult at times.  And if you are really unlucky they might be lazy, unmotivated, weak, over-emotional and sarcastic – all at the same time.

You’re not a powerless victim

Even in very difficult circumstances you can usually do something to help the situation. In most cases you really can learn how to get on with the boss. And, you’re more in control than you think. So, it’s a case of understanding what makes them tick, why they react as they do, and then approaching things in a way that gets the best out of your boss.

There has been a lot of interest in this subject and I’ve received a lot of questions. So, I wrote a concise and practical eBook on how to get on with the boss. And, in it you will learn how to make a great first and lasting impression at work. How to Help your boss help you. Don’t be made unhappy, suffer stress and lose confidence because you cannot get on with the person in charge. Poor relationships at work can damage life at home as well as your career. There can be long-term effects on health and on your motivation.  My little eBook can really help you avoid the pitfalls and build a strong, positive, relationship with your boss.


How To Get On With The Boss covers;

•What it means to get on with the boss
•Why it matters
•How to know whether you get on with your boss
•Getting it right
•What your boss really wants
•How requirements can change over time
•Making a good first impression
•Keeping respect once you are experienced in the role
•What to do when things go wrong
•Bosses with problems
•Demon bosses
•Putting things right
•Moving on when it is time to go
•Bullying

Here is a link to the book

And if you would like a coach to support you as you deal with your boss, please get in touch.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

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Open to the unexpected

Open to the unexpected

Career Development – Always Be Open To Serendipity

Serendipity – the faculty of making fortunate discoveries by accident.

Open to the unexpected – I come from a generation that was taught to make career plans looking 5, 10 and 20 years ahead. We could always tell you what our next move was going to be and when we were going to make it. Now, of course, things have changed. There isn’t an economic forecaster in the world who can predict what the economy, and the world of work, is going to be like in 10 years’ time. Even looking 5 years ahead, has lots of risks around it. But, we all make some assumptions about the future in choosing a profession or investing in a new business.

Looking back, though, life was never as my friends and I had forecast. Things happened that we didn’t expect. New opportunities arose – one former colleague was offered a year’s secondment from London to Tuvalu. Tuvalu is a Polynesian island nation located in the Pacific Ocean, midway between Hawaii and Australia. It changed her life forever. Another spent six months in Greece working for the UN in his forties. He changed so much his wife didn’t recognise him when she came to visit – he looked years younger. Others found themselves falling in love or having children they hadn’t expected. For others, a change was far less fortunate. But some were very lucky indeed and reached the top in their chosen field by virtue of a number of quite lucky breaks – I don’t mean they had not prepared well.

Always Be Open To Possibilities

It does help to have a vision of the kind of life you want to lead and to know the kind of work you want to do and what you are good at. Working at what you are good at does help. As does getting better at doing it and showing your enthusiasm. But, what matters most is to be open to possibilities and to be prepared to listen to your own heart and intuition.

I had always written poetry and articles but never anything longer than about 3,000 words, except for formal written reports at work. Then, out of the blue, a while ago, I had a dream. Yes, a real dream while I was asleep. And out of that dream came the idea and inspiration for a novel.  I could have just dismissed the idea, of course, because it didn’t fit in with my plans at that time. I didn’t! I went with the flow.

A while ago saw the publication of my first novel, The Wolf Project. I can’t tell you how much I enjoyed writing it and how proud I am to have my name on the cover. It is a gift I never expected– an example of serendipity at play – I discovered I could write a novel.

You never know what surprises, and what opportunities, life has in store for you. So keep an open mind. Be prepared to be flexible and open to the possibilities. Who knows, serendipity may fly in your direction any day now, just as she did in mine.  And you may end up being just as grateful.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

As well as the Wolf Project, Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

Are you feeling stuck at work?

Are you feeling stuck at work?

Career development: What To Do When You Feel  Stuck!

Are you feeling stuck at work? So you took this job full of enthusiasm.  You thought it was the right job, at the right time, in the right place.  It looked interesting and you liked the people who interviewed you. They told you how the company was committed to good management and developing their people.  There seemed to be really good opportunities to advance your career. And everyone told you how lucky you were to get a job.

You’ve been there a year now! And things have not turned out as you expected. Yes, the job was interesting when you first started. There was a lot to learn. Your manager is good at her job but these days she never seems to know what is going on at the top.  Everyone’s budget has been cut. A member of your team who left to go travelling has not been replaced.  You and the rest of the team are having to work harder. Provide cover is difficult. So, there is very little possibility that you will allowed to go on that part-time training course. Even if you fund the training yourself.

Right now you are feeling stuck at work

You are feeling stuck and wonder if you made the right decision. But all those people who told you were lucky to get the job are saying you would be foolish to leave.

Sadly, you are not alone! I keep hearing this tale from clients and from people I meet in social media. There are lots of good organizations, and good managers. But right now they are not offering many career development opportunities for their staff. Training budgets were cut a long time ago cut and vacancies are being held again.

Uncertainty means people are reluctant to move on. And that means opportunities for promotion, and for moving round inside the organization, may be less.  Everyone in the public and private sectors seems to be working harder and longer.

So what can you do?

Well, first of all see this for what it is; it isn’t personal.  These tough conditions are likely to continue. But there are job opportunities out there. And job search is much better done while you are already in employment. But don’t just jump to thinking that leaving this employer is necessarily the best move. Instead, start to think creatively about where you are now and the job you do.

Are there changes you can make to improve how you and your team are working? Can you show you are improving productivity and efficiency? Can you make improving things a special project that will benefit you, as well as the company?

What about forming a learning group with your own team? How about developing an action learning set as a regular lunch time activity? Perhaps you could learn in your own time how to facilitate the set.  That way everyone will benefit.

If you are in an organization that has other people at your level, could you organise a job swap? It would give you and a colleague some wider experience.

If your manager really doesn’t know what is going on at the top, can you find out more yourself? Could you use the internet to find what is happening in the sector? What is the world outside saying about your company and its major customers?

It’s up to you in the end!

Of course it is always sensible to keep your CV up to date and keep your eyes open for other opportunities. Even though the best move is not necessarily out.  All jobs have periods when they are more or less interesting. Much of the motivation to do the work is going to need to come from within you.  What is special about what you do and how can you take pride in it? At the end of the day, you, not your employer are responsible for your career development.

Working with a career coach really can help you get passed the block. Why not take advantage of my offer of a free half hour coaching session to find out how I can help

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

Unhappy at work

Unhappy at work

Unhappy at work – the sad fact is that very few of us are lucky enough to be unhappy at workhappy all the time at work. For some though, sadly, they are not happy for most of the time. When that happens to you, you may need to spend a little time thinking through exactly why you are unhappy. And then you  can decide best what to do about it.

Most of us have days when we get up not excited about the prospect of going to work. It might be because we know we have something ahead that is very challenging. I mean the kind of challenging that checks the box that says “this challenge is really exciting and it is motivating me to do well”. But, even when you feel confident and competent in the job, some challenges will feel daunting.

There will be some challenges where you feel you really do not have the competencies needed to do well. In those circumstances, it is wise to seek help from your line manager, a mentor or a friendly colleague. It is better to have the strength and humility to seek help than to race on towards possible failure and more unhappiness.

If your unhappy at work is a question of confidence, then again training and support are available. There are lots of coaches like me who would be very happy to work with you. Most of us will work with you as a one off to help you to prepare for a special event and we’ll certainly work with you to resolve deeper issues. Plus, you can find lots of books to help you work on strengthening your confidence.

Of course there are all kinds of unhappiness at work. Here are just to few things that can make you unhappy at work;

1. The Job Itself

a. May be over and sometimes under-demanding
b. May have turned out to require a different skill set to that advertised or it has changed over time.

2. The people

a. The person we work for may be unpleasant to the point being a bully or perhaps pleasant but just not very good at managing
b. The team we work with may be poorly led, unpleasant or simply dysfunctional in some other way for example without clear terms of reference

3. The Environment

a. The location, accommodation or commute may be unpleasant.
b. The company may be failing or in difficulties for some reason
c. The culture of the organization may be one in which we can’t feel happy, fulfilled and appreciated

What really matters when you are unhappy is to try to be very clear about the reason. Until you are clear, it is quite difficult to define your options for putting things right. Too often the first response is simply to think I just need to get out. And in the present climate, that isn’t realistic!

Never be afraid to ask for help. There are lots of us out there who be pleased to talk to you!

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

Re-applying for your own job

Re-applying for your own job

Re-applying for your own job – far too many organisations now are asking their Re-applying for your own jobstaff to do this  Sometimes, this is because there has been re-organisation after, say, a merger.   And quite often it seems to happen during downsizing on the pretext of re-organisation. Whatever the reason, it usually causes anger, frustration and just plain fear among employees. It is certainly not the best way to keep up morale.

If it is your job on the line, how do you go about surviving the storm?

Well, first, telling the company exactly what you think of what they are doing isn’t going to help your application. Instead, it is better to vent in private with someone who you really trust.  While at work try to stay positive to make the best of a difficult situation.

Don’t make assumptions about your value to the organization. Now is the time to prove your worth.  Don’t assume that all the good things you have contributed have been registered; you need to make sure you get them on the record.

Recognise the reality of the situation

Your job is on the line and you are in competition. Do not start to play dirty tricks. But do recognise that in this kind of climate others might feel free to do so. Keep your wits about you while still trying to be a good team player. (Nobody said this was easy).

Work on polishing up your CV/resume to show the value you have added and the contribution you have delivered. Quantify your results and include hard facts about delivery.  Make sure you show your competence and contribution fully.

Target you CV to the job as it will be, just as you would when applying from outside the organization.  If you need to offer a cover letter make sure you enthuse about future possibilities – don’t be tempted to whine.  If it is a completely new role show how your skills are transferable and say why you want that role in particular even if it is the only one available. Show how you can meet their needs.

It may be hard to do but work on your relationship with managers who are going to be part of the future organization.

At the end of the day, if you can’t come to terms with this all this,  it might be better to move on. It might be time to seek new opportunities in a new organization. But even If you decide to leave, it is still in your long-term interest to stay on good terms with your managers.

Sorry, this isn’t the pleasantest topic to think about! Some of the advice above may be uncomfortable.  You have to make your own judgement about just how important having this job is to you and how far you are prepared to go to stay around.

If you need support in this or a similar situation please get in touch.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

Quotes on Career Success

Quotes on career success

Quotes on Career Success

Quotes on career success to inspire you. Something to think about when you need that extra boost.

Analyzing what you haven’t got as well as what you have is a necessary ingredient of a career. Orison Swett Marden

Communication–the human connection–is the key to personal and career success. Paul J. Meyer

What is the recipe for successful achievement? To my mind there are just four essential ingredients: Choose a career you love, give it the best there is in you, seize your opportunities, and be a member of the team. Benjamin F. Fairless

Any woman who has a career and a family automatically develops something in the way of two personalities, like two sides of a dollar bill, each different in design. Her problem is to keep one from draining the life from the other. Ivy Baker Priest

I’ve yet to be on a campus where most women weren’t worrying about some aspect of combining marriage, children, and a career. I’ve yet to find one where many men were worrying about the same thing. Gloria Steinem

Desire! That’s the one secret of every man’s career. Not education. Not being born with hidden talents. Desire. Bobby Unser

If the career you have chosen has some unexpected inconvenience, console yourself by reflecting that no career is without them. Jane Fonda

To find a career to which you are adapted by nature, and then to work hard at it, is about as near to a formula for success and happiness as the world provides. One of the fortunate aspects of this formula is that, granted the right career has been found, the hard work takes care of itself. Then hard work is not hard work at all. Mark Sullivan

The biggest mistake that you can make is to believe that you are working for somebody else. Job security is gone. The driving force of a career must come from the individual. Remember: Jobs are owned by the company, you own your career! Earl Nightingale

The true measure of a career is to be able to be content, even proud, that you succeeded through your own endeavors without leaving a trail of casualties in your wake. Alan Greenspan

People have an idea that one is in control of a career, a lot more than you really are. You can engineer things to an extent. But you are at the mercy of what comes in across the desk. Gary Oldman

When you are inspired by some great purpose, some extraordinary project, all your thoughts break their bounds. Your mind transcends limitations, your consciousness expands in every direction and you find yourself in a new, great and wonderful world. Dormant forces, faculties and talents become alive, and you discover yourself to be a greater person by far than you ever dreamed yourself to be. Patanjali

The past is not your potential. In any hour you can choose to liberate the future. Marilyn Ferguson

If you follow your bliss, you put yourself on a kind of track, which has been there all the while waiting for you, and the life that you ought to be living is the one you are living. Joseph Campbell

The strongest oak tree of the forest is not the one that is protected from the storm and hidden from the sun. It’s the one that stands in the open where it is compelled to struggle for its existence against the winds and rains and the scorching sun. Napoleon Hill

Keep away from people who try to belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you too can become great. Mark Twain

The decisions you make about your work life are especially important, since most people spend more of their waking lives working than doing anything else. Your choices will affect, not only yourself and those closest to you, but in some way the whole world. Laurence G. Boldt

Talents are common, everyone has them – but rare is the courage to follow our talents where they lead. Anon

There is no security in life, only opportunity. Mark Twain

The people who get on in this world are the people who get up and look for the circumstances they want, and if they can’t find them, make them. George Bernard Shaw

I’m a great believer in luck, and I find that the harder I work, the more I have of it. Thomas Jefferson

I hope these quotes on career success inspire you.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

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