Anger at Work

Anger at Work

Ten Ways to Manage Anger at Work

Anger at Work – I found this great post on the Working Dynamics’ website – you can find the link below!

“What makes you angry at work? Is being treated disrespectfully a trigger for you? Does it make you angry when someone goes through the files on your desk to find a report rather than waiting until you return to ask you for it? Do you get angry when you sense that you and co-workers are being used for another’s purposes? Or does the micro-managing boss “push your buttons”?

We are all different, and each of us is different from one situation to another. You might have a short fuse one day and be easygoing and tolerant the next day. Knowing what triggers your anger is the place to start. Next, recognize when a trigger is presenting itself and decide how you want to respond… ”

You can read the rest of this great post at this link http://www.workdyn.com/tools-AngerMgt.html
Wendy Mason is a Career Coach and Life Coach helping you to solve difficult problems at work
wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com 
http://wisewolfcoaching.com

  • Career Development – When Panic Becomes the Norm at Work!
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Difficult people – stay neutral!

Difficult people – stay neutral!

Difficult people! We all meet difficult people at work and in our private lives. Dealing with difficult people is a subject that seems to generate more interest than anything else, here and at my other blog, WiseWolf’s Your Happiness Factor. So I’m making no apologies for writing about this again.

Difficult people can do more than make us unhappy.  As if that isn’t bad enough, difficult people can be bad for your health.  If you let them stress you out, that can lead to physical and the psychological problems.

If we meet difficult people in the workplace and they are work colleagues, the stress is on-going.  Even if you are the manager of a difficult person, it can take a toll.  And, if the “difficult person” is your boss, the stress can be almost intolerable. I’m not talking here about a bullying boss; just someone who is difficult to work with.

This video discusses how it is important to stay calm, stay in a neutral space and stay assertive. Try not to let them engage your emotions – you can use visualization to help do this. Accept that all you can control is how you react.

And, yes, it often helps to work with a coach.

This video from http://www.howdini.com/howdini-video-… Mary Bolster, editor of Natural Health Magazine, has some excellent reminders to help you deal with the difficult people in your life.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

People at work – how to deal with difficult people – stay neutral!

People at work – how to deal with difficult people – stay neutral!

We all meet difficult people at work and in our private lives.  Dealing with difficult people is a subject that seems to generate more interest than anything else, here and at my other blog, WiseWolf’s Your Happiness Factor.  So I’m making no apologies for posting about this again.

Difficult people can do more than make us unhappy.  As if that isn’t bad enough, difficult people can be bad for your health.  If you let them stress you out, that can lead to physical and the psychological problems.

If we meet difficult people in the workplace and they are work colleagues, the stress is on-going.  Even if you are the manager of a difficult person, it can take a toll.  And, if the “difficult person” is your boss, the stress can be almost intolerable. I’m not talking here about a bullying boss; just someone who is difficult to work with.

This video discusses how it is important to stay calm, stay in a neutral space and stay assertive. Try not to let them engage your emotions – you can use visualization to help do this. Accept that all you can control is how you react.

And, yes, it often helps to work with a coach.

You might find this  other post about learning from difficult people useful too.

This video from http://www.howdini.com/howdini-video-… Mary Bolster, editor of Natural Health Magazine, has some excellent reminders to help you deal with the difficult people in your life.

Wendy Mason is the Happiness Coach and author of a new novel, The Wolf Project Wendy is a life and career coach and writer. She is passionate about helping people find happiness at work and at home! She helps people reach their goals and aspirations, without sacrificing their home and personal life.  She believes coaching requires compassion, warmth and empathy. Wendy helps people reach their career goals and aspirations, without sacrificing their home and personal life. You can contact Wendy at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com and find out more at http://wisewolfcoaching.com

CV review and interview preparation a speciality

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Preventing Violence in the Workplace

Preventing Violence in the Workplace

Management – Preventing Violence and Harassment in the Workplace

Preventing Violence in the Workplace – any form of harassment and violence at work, whether it is committed by co-workers, managers or third-parties like customers or suppliers, is unacceptable.

As well as being wrong ethically, it affects the physical and psychological health of those involved. Yet according to the British Crime Survey (BCS) in 2006/07, there were an estimated 684,000 workplace incidents, (288,000 assaults and 397,000 threats of violence).

Tolerance, diversity, dignity and respect are benchmarks for business and organizational success, so it is in a manager’s interest to identify and address the threat of harassment and violence in the workplace. But there are legal duties too.

Preventing Violence in the Workplace

Employers and managers are required to protect the health and safety of all their workers,. Failure to deal with, and take reasonable steps to prevent, harassment and violence not only undermines business performance, it could be unlawful.

Employers and unions have a common, shared interest in preventing harassment and violence. And in 2007, the European Union social partners reached an agreement on the issue.

As a result in the UK, the Trades Union Congress (TUC),the Confederation of British Industry (CBI) and the Partnership of Public Employers (PPE) for employers in the private and public sectors issued guidance to implement the agreement in the UK. This had the support of the Government, including the Health and Safety Executive (HSE), the Advisory, Conciliation and Arbitration Service (ACAS) and the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS).

The aim of the agreement and the guidance is to;

• Raise awareness and increase the understanding of employers, workers and their representatives of workplace harassment

• Provide employers, workers and their representatives with a framework of response to identify, prevent and manage problems of harassment and all forms of violence at work.

You can find the guidance at this link http://www.hse.gov.uk/violence/preventing-workplace-harassment.pdf

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

Management – Preventing Violence and Harassment in the Workplace

Violence!

Management – Preventing Violence and Harassment in the Workplace

Any form of harassment and violence at work, whether it is committed by co-workers, managers or third-parties like customers or suppliers, is unacceptable.

As well as being wrong ethically, it affects the physical and psychological health of those involved. Yet according to the British Crime Survey (BCS) in 2006/07, there were an estimated 684,000 workplace incidents, (288,000 assaults and 397,000 threats of violence).

Tolerance, diversity, dignity and respect are benchmarks for business and organizational success, so it is in a manager’s interest to identify and address the threat of harassment and violence in the workplace.

But there are legal duties too.

Employers and managers are required to protect the health and safety of all their workers,. Failure to deal with, and take reasonable steps to prevent, harassment and violence not only undermines business performance, it could be unlawful.

Employers and unions have a common, shared interest in preventing harassment and violence. And in 2007, the European Union social partners reached an agreement on the issue.

As a result in the UK, the Trades Union Congress (TUC),the Confederation of British Industry (CBI) and the Partnership of Public Employers (PPE) for employers in the private and public sectors issued guidance to implement the agreement in the UK. This had the support of the Government, including the Health and Safety Executive (HSE), the Advisory, Conciliation and Arbitration Service (ACAS) and the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS).

The aim of the agreement and the guidance is to;

• Raise awareness and increase the understanding of employers, workers and their representatives of workplace harassment

• Provide employers, workers and their representatives with a framework of response to identify, prevent and manage problems of harassment and all forms of violence at work.

You can find the guidance at this link http://www.hse.gov.uk/violence/preventing-workplace-harassment.pdf

Want to be a Confident Networker? Join my free teleseminar on 26thJune 2012

Wendy Mason is a Life and Career Coach.  She helps people have the confidence they need to be successful at work and to change career while maintaining a good work/life balance. You can email her at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com


Other  articles by Wendy

 

>"It's natural to feel angry, but…!" Handling that Anger!

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Angry Penguin 

Anger usually arises from some form of perceived transgression against yourself.  It needn’t be real – you just need to believe it happened! 
When the organisation you have worked for years, suddenly seems to be showing you the door, anger is an understandable reaction!
Anger comes about in three main areas
  • Someone or some thing gets in the way and stops you achieving a goal
  • Someone or some organisation breaks your personal rules.  For example, ‘I’ve worked for them for years and now they want to get rid of me!’
  • You self esteem feels threatened

Being made redundant or being “persuaded” to go “voluntarily” can tick all three boxes!

You feel angry and you may lash out verbally or physically.  Or you may displace your aggression and take it out on someone else; the family at home, for example, or someone more junior who is staying.  
Instead of attacking you may withdraw – storming out or simply opting out of active engagemnt with the work you are expected to complete!
Or you may attack indirectly – for example, subverting or spreading rumours about what the changes really mean – a passive aggressive response.
the "angry wasp", ensign of the 21º ... 
But it is clear that prolonged anger damages you mentally and physically!
You may believe that letting it out is the best way to deal with it.  But big, explosive, ‘cathartic’ expressions of anger reinforce your anger because the underlying beliefs are strengthened. 
To get over being angry you have first to get over the idea that others make you angry!
If others annoy you, it really is you who presses the anger button so that you ‘blow your top’!  
You ‘lose your temper’, no one takes it from you!  
And you probably regret it later, which shows that other options were available.
Your self talk determines how you respond to a situation. Anger results from how you think about a situation, not the situation itself.
Examine the potential results of your anger building up on top of the other challenges you face. 
  • Do you really want to risk damaged relationships?  
  • You will probably need to reference from your employer so now is not the time for poor performance!
  • Being in a constant state of anger will take a toll on both your physical and mental health!  

Look at alternative responses!  
You will be much better placed if you can be assertive rather than angry.  You should stand up for yourself  but without  loss of control.  
Begin to develop an early warning system by recognizing the early signs of anger (muscle tension, clenched fists, the rising voice and impatience) and then learn how to diffuse it,  You can talk yourself down or leave the situation and, when you are calmer, think how to deal with the situation in a more constructive way.
Start slowly and keep practicing.  If you can, talk to those closest to you, tell them why you are doing it and ask them to support you.
Here is a really useful website


Wendy Mason is used to working with people moving out of the Public   Sector! She is a performance, programme, contract management and change specialist. She works as a consultant, business coach and blogger.  Adept at problem solving, she is a great person to bring in when that one thing you thought was straightforward turns out not to be! If you have a problem talk to Wendy – she can help you – email her at wendymason@leavingthepublicsector.net or ring ++44(0)7867681439
You can find her business blog at www.wisewolftalking.com  

DEALING WITH ANGER

Anger usually arises from some form of perceived transgression against yourself.  It needn’t be real – you just need to believe it happened!

It comes about in three main areas

  • Some one or some thing gets in the way and stops you achieving a goal
  • Someone or some organisation breaks you personal rules.  For example, ‘I’ve worked for them for years and now they want to get rid of me!’
  • You self esteemed feel threatened

You feel angry and you may lash out verbally or physically.  Or you may displace your aggression and take it out on someone else.  Instead of attacking you may withdraw – storm out! Or you may attack indirectly – for example, subverting or spreading rumours – a passive aggressive response.

But it is clear that prolonged anger damages you mentally and physically!

You may believe that letting it out is the best way to deal with it.  But ‘cathartic’ expressions of anger reinforce your anger because the underlying beliefs are strengthened. To get over being angry you have first to get over the idea that others make you angry! If others annoy you, it is you who presses the anger button so that you ‘blow your top’!  You ‘lose your temper’, no one takes it from you!  And you probably regret it later which shows that other options were available.

Your self talk determines how you respond to a situation. Anger results from how you think about a situation, not the situation itself.

Examine the potential results of your anger in terms of damaged relationships, poor performance and the effect on your physical and mental health!  Look at alternative responses  – being more assertive ( stand up for yourself without loss of control), developing an early warning system by recognizing the early signs of anger (muscle tension, clenched fists, the rising voice and impatience) and learn how to diffuse it,  You can talk yourself down or leave the situation and when you are calmer think how to deal with the situation in a more constructive way.

Here is a really useful website

http://www.mind.org.uk/help/diagnoses_and_conditions/dealing_with_anger

With grateful thanks to Life Coaching A Cognitive-Behavioural Approach Neenan and Dryden 2002