A boss who panics

A boss who panics

Problems at work: tip on how to work with a boss who panics

Advice from Wendy Smith; Career Coach and author of “How to Get On With the Boss” – order on Amazon

A boss who panics – most people I know have worked for a boss who was subject to panic. Or at least in their view, the boss was someone subject to panic. Managers are human and being human they don’t always behave well. Good managers recognize this in themselves. They check how they are behaving and acknowledge when they need to make a change. Some managers do not. And for a number, panicking can become a habit, particularly if they feel insecure or lack confidence.

So, how should you respond?

Here are some tips on how to deal with a boss who panics.

1. Don’t join in the panic, but do show you want to help.
2. Get as much information as you can about the issue.
3. Make your own assessment – is this really is as urgent or as important as your boss is suggesting?
4. Be clear about priorities for the organization, your team and your role, as well as for key clients.
5. Are you the person best placed to handle the issue? If so, can you persuade your boss to delegate the task to you with occasional reports on progress?
6. Show you are willing to help.  Even if the issue isn’t for you, show you are willing to help and move things forward.
7. Agree clear arrangements for reporting back with your boss. Those reports may have to be more frequent than you would choose. But an agreed reporting procedure should reassure your boss and give you the space you need to complete the task.
8. Shield your team – if you are a manager yourself, then try to shield your team from the effects of your boss’s panic.
9. Reassure your boss – above all seek to reassure your boss and take responsibility for dealing with the issue if you can
10. Post action analysis – after dealing with the immediate problem, try to work out why your boss is responding in this way. Then, if you can, offer support, show loyalty and give reassurance.
11. Is the behavior really disrupting the team?  Do you have a good relationship with boss? Then afterwards try to feed back to you boss how this is affecting others and the efficiency of the group. But choose your moment with care. Don’t do it when they are feeling panicked. Offer to work with them to introduce any changes that will make them feel more comfortable.
12. If you don’t get on well with the boss, consider your options.  Consider seriously whether this job is really worth suffering the long-term effects of stress which are usually the result.

I offer a free half hour coaching session by phone or Skype that help you deal with your boss. Here is the booking link –  Book a half hour trial 

Other resources for people with problem bosses

As a coach I work with lots of people who have problems with their boss. So I wrote a little book to help them. You can help your boss help you – don’t be made unhappy, suffer stress and lose confidence because you cannot get on with the person in charge. Poor relationships at work can damage life at home as well as your career. My book can help.

Remember working with a career coach can really help you feel happier at work.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book your free 30 minute, no obligation, trial coaching session with Wendy Smith now at this Link 

 

Stand Out At Interview

Stand Out At Interview

Job Search: How to Stand Out From The Crowd

Advice from Wendy Smith; Career Coach and author of The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book – order on Amazon

Stand out at interview if you want to be successful. If you want to be offered that longed-for job, these days you need to do more than simply prove you can do the work. It is likely that you will be one among several candidates who can provide evidence of that.

So what can mark you out as that special candidate – the one they want?

I’ve spent a lot of time thinking about my experience as both interviewer and interviewee. I’ve come to the conclusion it all comes down to the three Es; enthusiasm, energy and engagement.

Stand out at interview – enthusiasm

It is great if a candidate shows they really care about my vacancy. I don’t want to feel that mine is just another on the long list they have applied for. If they are interested in my job, they will have done their home work and know about my organization, who our customers are and the sector we work in. They will be able to show me why they think this is a great opportunity for them.

Energy

I want to find a sense of resilience and energy. The successful candidate is going to be someone not likely to be daunted by the challenges ahead.

Engagement

Candidates who actively engage with the interviewer and the interview process put themselves at the head of the field. By that I mean someone who walks into the room with confidence and then takes part in a real discussion. Not someone who simply pours out information in response to the questions asked. Their body language will show real interest and they will keep up good eye contact. They will have high self-esteem without arrogance.

If you can show the three Es at your next interview, you are pretty much bound to make a good impression.

Other resources to help your job search

In the job market, there are always lots of useful techniques to learn or to refresh. From writing a modern CV to wooing at the interview, you’ll find lots of tips in my handy little pocket book.

Stand Out At Interview
A concise and practical little workbook. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

A concise and practical little work book. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

Find this and my other books on my Amazon page at this link; http://ow.ly/BRSAL

Remember working with a career coach can really help career resilience. Get in touch at the Facing a mid-career dilemmaemail address below – I offer a free half hour trial session by phone or Skype.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book your free 30 minute, no obligation, trial coaching session with Wendy Smith now at this Link 

Career resilience – how to build yours

Career resilience – how to build yours

Managing your career in uncertain times!

Advice from Wendy Smith; Career Coach and author of The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book – order on Amazon

Career resilience – the job market is much more volatile than it used to be and job security seems to be an outdated concept.  I hope that you are one of the lucky ones, very happy in your present role and committed to doing well in a good job. If you are very lucky, you work in an organization that has real opportunities to advance your career. But, if not, here are some steps you can take to shore yourself up against uncertainty.

How to build career resilience

  1. Keep your career portfolio up-to-date! Even when you are happy in a good long-term and, apparently, secure job, always keep your resume, application materials, and potential references and their contact information up-to-date.
  2. Invest in your own training! Make sure you access any training and development opportunities available though your work. But don’t be afraid to invest yourself in training to keep your skills up to date. Take advantage of free online courses on sites like eDX and Coursera
  3. Extend and maintain your professional network. Join and become actively involved in online social media sites such as LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter. But do it in a professional and career related way. You never know when you might be approached about an opportunity you can’t afford to miss.
  4. Keep your professional association memberships up-to-date and take part in association events. They will help to keep you up to date with developments in your field, as well as getting you noticed and helping you to make new contacts.
  5. Get actively involved in community and civic events, consider volunteering and join leisure groups, particularly those that take you out into the open air. Not only will it help to you to stay healthy and bring balance to your life, it may also open up possibilities.
  6. Eat lunch with a friend! Try to eat lunch with a friend or meet up at least once a week. Make sure you offer support when they need it. Should the worst happen, their support to you may prove invaluable.

The actions above will help to make your life richer but they will also give you a personal safety net for your career.

Other resources to help you maintain career resilience

In the job market, there are always lots of useful techniques to learn or to refresh. From writing a modern CV to wooing at the interview, you’ll find lots of tips in my handy little pocket book.

career resilience
A concise and practical little workbook. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

A concise and practical little work book. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

Find this and my other books on my Amazon page at this link; http://ow.ly/BRSAL

Remember working with a career coach can really help career resilience. Get in touch at the Facing a mid-career dilemmaemail address below – I offer a free half hour trial session by phone or Skype.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book your free 30 minute, no obligation, trial coaching session with Wendy Smith now at this Link 

Give the recruiter what they say they want

Give the recruiter what they say they want

Advice from Wendy Smith; Career Coach and author of The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book – order on Amazon

Here is a tip from my book; The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book; How to Win Jobs and Influence Recruiters.

Give the recruiter what they say they want – successful companies focus on meeting the wants of their customers. Note what I said there; I wrote the word “wants,” not the word “needs”. A customer may not know what they need. But they do know what they want. And that may well not be the same thing. It is all too easy to lose sight of this. Then, you focus on what you think they need or, even worse, what you feel comfortable delivering.

If you stop to think about it, exactly the same thing applies when you are applying for jobs.

Getting the job doesn’t so much depend on you providing what you think they need. It depends on you providing what they think they want and believe they need. Give the recruiter what they say they want – it is important.

This may come as a shock to some unsuccessful candidates who believed they had what it took to do the job. They had decided what the employer should be looking for in a particular role. So that is what they set out to show. But what the employer believed they wanted was something rather different.

This is why it is so important to read the job specification carefully! Then make sure you show how you can deliver exactly what the employer has said they need. If there is no job specification, ask lots of questions and research the employing organization carefully.

If the recruiting employer really is way off the mark in terms of what they think they want, they are much more likely to listen to you when they are convinced by your credentials.

Win their confidence first in, say, your technical ability, then try to do a little re-education. But do it with care – it is just possible there is very good reason for what they wanted. Confidence is all in job search but don’t give the recruiter an opportunity to confuse that with arrogance.

Other resources for the job seeker

As a job seeker, there are lots of useful techniques to learn or to refresh. From writing a modern CV to wooing at the interview, you’ll find lots of tips in my handy little pocket book.

job search networking
A concise and practical little workbook. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

A concise and practical little work book. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

Find this and my other books on my Amazon page at this link; http://ow.ly/BRSAL

Remember working with a career coach can really help job search. Get in touch at the Facing a mid-career dilemmaemail address below – I offer a free half hour trial session by phone or Skype.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book your free 30 minute, no obligation, trial coaching session with Wendy Smith now at this Link 

Your first day in a new job!

Your first day in a new job!

Career Development: Your first day in a new job!

Advice from Wendy Smith; Career Coach and author of The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book – order on Amazon

Here is a tip from my book; The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book; How to Win Jobs and Influence Recruiters.

Your first day in a new job! – so you are starting a new job on Monday. Many congratulations. Here are a few tips to help you make a good impression on your first day.

  1. If you’ve been out of work for some time, you may need to re-train your body to keep regular “working” hours. To do this successfully you need a couple of weeks, if possible, of going to bed and getting up at the same time as you will when you start work. That should give your internal clock some chance of adapting.
  2. Make sure you test drive the journey to your new workplace at the time of day when you will be travelling. If you take public transport, check the timetable and on your first day allow at least ten minutes extra for your journey. This isn’t the day to be late
  3. Every office has its own informal (and sometimes formal) dress code. Pay attention to what other people are wearing when you go for the interview. If you are not sure then speak to the HR department and ask them. You want to fit in as quickly as you can and how you dress can help you. In any case go for clean and well-pressed clothes and clean your shoes. Don’t break in new shoes on your first day.
  4. The first day will be a whirlwind of introductions and meetings. You’ll collect lots of information but there will be lots you are likely to forget. Carry a small notebook and make notes – you’ll be grateful later. For technical stuff, learn the names of those to go to for advice; don’t try to learn complicated routines on your first day. Names and roles are usually the most important notes to take; people like you to remember their name.
  5. Don’t be scared to ask questions. If your boss gives you a task, try to get all the details straight during that first meeting. Asking questions won’t look stupid – just intelligent and thorough. Ask who, apart from the boss, you could go to with later questions if you have them.
  6. Remember, the best way to get people on-side is to listen to them. Show respect for their opinions even if you don’t agree with them. Make sure you understand their ideas and value them before considering introducing your own.

Other resources for the job seeker

As a job seeker, there are lots of useful techniques to learn or to refresh. From writing a modern CV to wooing at the interview, you’ll find lots of tips in my handy little pocket book.

Your first day in a new job!
A concise and practical little workbook. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

A concise and practical little work book. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

Find this and my other books on my Amazon page at this link; http://ow.ly/BRSAL

Remember working with a career coach can really help job search. Get in touch at the Facing a mid-career dilemmaemail address below – I offer a free half hour trial session by phone or Skype.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book your free 30 minute, no obligation, trial coaching session with Wendy Smith now at this Link 

Be passionate in your job search

Be passionate in your job search

Job Search:Time To Be Passionate

Advice from Wendy Smith; Career Coach and author of The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book – order on Amazon

Be passionate –  when people talk to me about career development and job search, I tell them they need to be clear about what really matters to them. Lots of people look for roles that show what they think they should want. They don’t consider what they actually enjoy doing. Usually, this has to do with money! It is difficult to be passionate about a job you do just for the money. And being passionate is key to impressing a prospective employer.

Now, let us not be naive, money is important to most of us. But to take a job that meets no other criteria, can be the first step on the road to disaster.

You need to understand what you really care about. And when it comes to interviews, you may well be asked what you are passionate about.

But, you have to be practical. Saying that your passion is for something that is going to mean traveling to the other side of the world for weeks at a time may not get you that job with a local employer.

Be honest. But think about what is going to present you in a reasonable light at your interview. And make sure that you can back up your statement with information about your experience and future intentions.

Do not declare a passion for something you know very little about it. You should be able to talk about your choice with interest and enthusiasm.

Having and showing passion, and the energy associated with it, is attractive. It makes you more interesting to employers and to the world at large. You become a little more charismatic.

So, what is your passion?

Other resources for the job seeker

As a job seeker, there are lots of useful techniques to learn or to refresh. From writing a modern CV to wooing at the interview, you’ll find lots of tips in my handy little pocket book.

be passionate
A concise and practical little workbook. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

A concise and practical little work book. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

Find this and my other books on my Amazon page at this link; http://ow.ly/BRSAL

Remember working with a career coach can really help job search. Get in touch at the Facing a mid-career dilemmaemail address below – I offer a free half hour trial session by phone or Skype.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book your free 30 minute, no obligation, trial coaching session with Wendy Smith now at this Link 

Values – Prioritizing and Affirming

Values – Prioritizing and Affirming

Values and Why They Are Important – Prioritizing and Affirming Your Own Values

Advice from Wendy Smith; Career Coach and Life Coach; author of The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book – order on Amazon

Values – Prioritizing and Affirming – understanding your own values is key to leading a happy and fulfilled life. Knowing them can guide you in deciding the work you want to do and even how you choose a life partner. Understanding them can help you deal with many of the challenges you will meet through life and how to make the best choice in different situations.

Prioritizing and Affirming Your Own Values

Prioritizing your most important values is difficult. You need to look deep inside yourself and be very honest.

When you make a decision you may realise you are having to deal with values that don’t ring true for you. And they may conflict. So, you will have to make a choice.  This is when you need to know which value is more important to you. Without clarity such a conflict can cause great unhappiness.

Write down your most significant values; such as, integrity, freedom, status, financial recognition. But don’t put them in any particular order. Then look at the first two values and ask yourself, “If I could satisfy only one of these, which would I choose?”

It might help to visualize a situation in which you would have to make a choice. For example, compare the values of service and stability. Imagine that you must decide whether to sell your house and risk moving to another country to do work that could fulfill a long-held ambition. Or you can stay in your present job with more limited opportunities but keep your house!  What would you decide?

Keep working through the list, by comparing each value with each one of the rest, until your list is in the correct order.

Reaffirm your values

Check your top-priority values, and make sure they fit with your life and your vision for yourself.

  • Do these values make you feel good about yourself?
  • Are you proud of your top three values?
  • Would you be comfortable and proud to tell your values to people you respect and admire?
  • Do these values represent things you would support, even if your choice isn’t popular.

Now, you need to consider how these values will be reflected in your life at work, at home or in relationships.

When you consider your values in decision-making, you will keep your sense of integrity. Reflecting your values increases your feeling of self-worth and self-confidence.

Making a value-based choice isn’t always be easy. But it is the way to happiness and peace of mind.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. If you would like help finding a job, with problems at work or at home, or with relationships, contact Wendy. Book your free 30 minute, no obligation, trial coaching session with Wendy Smith now at this Link 

You can find Wendy’s books on Amazon at this link

Values - Prioritizing and Affirming

Contact Employers Direct

Contact Employers Direct

Contact Employers Direct In Your Job Search

Advice from Wendy Smith; Career Coach and author of The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book – order on Amazon

Here is a tip from my book; The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book; How to Win Jobs and Influence Recruiters.

Contact employers direct in your job search because most vacancies, particularly in the private sector, are never advertised. They are filled by people already known to the employer or known to a contact of the employer. So it is makes sense to make yourself known.

There is no reason you should not contact an employer to find out more about the organization and to ask about opportunities. If an employer can fill a job without advertising, it saves them time and cost.

Even if they don’t have vacancies right now and you make a good impression, they are likely to think of you in the future.

Making Contact

First, find out as much as you can about the organization before you write. Identify a suitable senior manager or professional and address your letter to them. Look for someone in a position of influence but outside HR. A direct approach to a senior executive in the department you want to work in is usually more successful.

Tailor your letter carefully to show your interest in the organization; tell them why you would like to work with them. Show how what you have to offer might meet their needs. Ask for an opportunity to talk to them to learn more about the organization and future opportunities. Offer to send your CV.

Keep your letter simple, straight forward, polite and on one sheet. Check it very carefully for accuracy and typos.

If you have done your research and show a real interest in the organization and how you can add value, a direct contact can be very successful.

Other resources for the job seeker

As a job seeker, there are lots of useful techniques to learn or to refresh. From writing a modern CV to wooing at the interview, you’ll find lots of tips in my handy little pocket book.

Contact employers direct
A concise and practical little workbook. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

A concise and practical little work book. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

Find this and my other books on my Amazon page at this link; http://ow.ly/BRSAL

Remember working with a career coach can really help job search. Get in touch at the Facing a mid-career dilemmaemail address below – I offer a free half hour trial session by phone or Skype.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book your free 30 minute, no obligation, trial coaching session with Wendy Smith now at this Link 

Your boss doesn’t talk to you

Your boss doesn’t talk to you

Advice from Wendy Smith; Career Coach and author of How To Get On With The Boss – order on Amazon

Your boss doesn’t talk to you! So you’ve done the new job for a while now. And you think you are doing OK. In fact you think you are doing better than OK.

But your boss gives you no sign of what she thinks about your performance. She comes in everyday, wishes you good morning and then disappears into her office. She’s quite pleasant and there is no suggestion that there is a problem, you just need to know what she really thinks about what you are doing.

This situation can feel totally demoralising and you begin to have all kinds of doubts. What can you do?

Well, you have to grasp the nettle and ask for the feedback that isn’t being volunteered.

First, gather your own evidence about your performance, such as, feedback from customers. Then, think about the questions you want to ask and how you are going to ask them; you don’t want to alienate your boss.

Now ask your boss for some time to talk. Choose your moment carefully – don’t ask when the boss is under pressure or about to go to an important meeting. Make sure you get the appointment in the boss’s diary and that you get enough time for a proper discussion. Ideally, you need at least 30 minutes – again not before or immediately after an event on which your boss is going to want to concentrate.

At the meeting make sure you emphasize that you want to take care of your boss’s interests as well as your own. You want to make sure that you are doing the job the boss wants you to do. Avoid getting into arguments or being confrontational. Use the evidence you have collected if you face any criticism you consider unjustified.

I expect you will be pleasantly surprised and that your boss is happy with what you’re doing. You just need to remind them that that is something you need to be told. I am sure all is well but you won’t know that for sure until you ask. Good luck.

Other resources for people with problem bosses

As a coach I work with lots of people who have problems with their boss. So I wrote a little book to help them. You can help your boss help you – don’t be made unhappy, suffer stress and lose confidence because you cannot get on with the person in charge. Poor relationships at work can damage life at home as well as your career. My book can help.

Remember working with a career coach can really help you feel happier at work. Get in touch at the Facing a mid-career dilemmaemail address below – I offer a free half hour trial session by phone or Skype.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book your free 30 minute, no obligation, trial coaching session with Wendy Smith now at this Link 

 

Providing References in Job Search

Providing References in Job Search

Advice from Wendy Smith; Career Coach and author of The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book – order on Amazon

Providing References in Job search – here is more advice from The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book.

Recruiters usually ask for references when you apply for a job. And many job seekers feel uncomfortable about approaching potential referees. You shouldn’t feel embarrassed though. Most people feel flattered when asked, but you should give them the opportunity to say no. Tell them you will understand if they feel they simply don’t know you well enough to help.

Here are my top tips for providing references in job search successfully.

  • Don’t add referees to your CV. When providing references, list them on a separate piece of paper if they are asked for by the recruiter.
  • Provide at least three. If the recruiter doesn’t specify how many are required, give three with clear contact information. Contact details should include name, role, organization, postal address, email and telephone number.
  • Include professional connections who will say things that support how well you are qualified for the job. You could include employers, colleagues and customers from earlier jobs. Also people you have worked with as a volunteer, or studied with like teachers and lecturers.
  • Short on professional references? Include a personal reference who can attest to your character and abilities.
  • Your present employer. If your present employer doesn’t know you are applying, don’t give their name at an early stage. If you are successful you will probably be asked to give their details later. Have care when you tell your present employer you are applying elsewhere and show them how you aim to support your current work before any move.
  • Ask permission. Always ask permission before you give someone’s name and tell them about any vacancy where you have mentioned them.
  • Remind your referees how good you are. I usually suggest people explain the vacancy to their referees and remind them why they think it is a good fit.
  • Are you in the public sector? Many public sector organizations will only offer bland references as your employer. When it arrives their reference may only be a statement that you worked for them in a particular grade or role over a particular time. Most large private sector employers know this but for others you may have to explain. You will usually need to give something more. Try asking your line manager or someone in your management line, if they would be ready to give you a personal reference as well as the one sent officially by HR. Many managers are more ready than you expect to help. Also consider approaching retired senior colleagues and others who have left the organization. You might also consider asking for a personal reference from someone who holds a senior position in the private sector. This is where people you have met during work in a voluntary capacity may be useful. Otherwise, consider people you have met through clubs and associations.
  • Say thank you. It is courteous thank your referees and let them know the outcome of your application. Who knows, if you are unsuccessful, they may be only too happy to let you know about a vacancy they just heard about.”

This is advice from my book; The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book, How to Win Jobs and Influence Recruiters.

Other resources for the job seeker

As a job seeker, there are lots of useful techniques to learn or to refresh. From writing a modern CV to wooing at the interview, you’ll find lots of tips in my handy little pocket book.

Providing References in Job Search
A concise and practical little workbook. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

A concise and practical little workbook. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

Find this and my other books on my Amazon page at this link; http://ow.ly/BRSAL

Remember working with a career coach can really help job search. Get in touch at the Facing a mid-career dilemmaemail address below – I offer a free half hour trial session by phone or Skype.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book your free 30 minute, no obligation, trial coaching session with Wendy Smith now at this Link