Looking For a Job While Still Employed

Looking For a Job While Still Employed

Advice from Wendy Smith; Career Coach and author of The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book – Wendy’s books on Amazon

Looking for a Job while still Employed – is it a good idea? Well, most recruitment experts will tell you that employed candidates have a distinct advantage over unemployed candidates. Though that might be uncomfortable to read, it seems to be true. But looking for work while still employed has its own risks and it needs to be managed carefully.

The first and most obvious danger is that your existing employer will find out and regard your search as an act of disloyalty. That isn’t true for all though. There are some sectors where it is common to develop your career by moving around. Some employers know that if they cannot give you development opportunities, you will look elsewhere. They can reasonably expect, though, you will stay long enough to give them a return on any investment they have made in you in terms of training. On top of that, you will support their search for a replacement.

Looking For a Job While Still Employed – Use Discretion

If you work for an employer who is likely to oppose your move, your job search needs to be conducted with care. You need to know that those to whom you disclose it will behave with discretion. If you can, keep everything quiet until you have a firm offer of employment.

Don’t let your job search distract you from doing well in your present role. If you do lose focus, you risk losing credibility not only with your present employer but more generally; you’d be surprised how quickly word gets round. Plus, a couple of failures at work soon impacts on your confidence in the job search.

When you do find your new role, treat your present employer and your colleagues with respect before your departure. You do not know when you may meet them again and being able to rely on a good reference will be invaluable in the future.

If you need help with your job search, please get in touch. Remember I offer a trial free half hour coaching session by phone or Skype.

Other resources to help your job search

In the job market, there are always lots of useful techniques to learn or to refresh. From writing a modern CV to wooing at the interview, you’ll find lots of tips in my handy little pocket-book.

Looking For a Job While Still Employed
A concise and practical little workbook. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

A concise and practical little work book, it is for all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

Find this and my other books on my Amazon page at this link; http://ow.ly/BRSAL

Remember working with a career coach can really help both  job search and career resilience. Get in touch at the Facing a mid-career dilemmaemail address below – I offer a free half hour trial session by phone or Skype.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book your free 30 minute, no obligation, trial coaching session with Wendy Smith now at this Link 

Applying for your own job

Applying for your own job

When you have to reapply for own job

Advice from Wendy Smith; Career Coach and author of The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book – Wendy’s books on Amazon

Applying for your own job – I know from working with my coaching clients, that is now a common experience. But I don’t think that reduces the personal pain. There you are doing what you think is a good job and then someone announces a re-structuring. Perhaps there is a merger or your company is acquired by another. Sometimes your organization needs to downsize. For whatever reason, you find yourself at risk and you have to compete for what you believed was yours. It may well be considered the fairest way to handle a change. And it does give all current employees an opportunity to apply. But it still hurts and shakes your confidence if your job up for grabs.

Applying for your own job – tips

  • First share your anger, frustration or disbelief with a partner, a close friend or a with coach like me> Do this and not with your colleagues or your employer. Although organizations are required to be fair, employers are more likely to favour employees with a positive attitude.
  • Set your mind on making the best application you can for the job, emphasizing the value your bring to the organization. Don’t assume your employer knows this already. And they may well bring in HR consultants from outside the organization to run the selection process. Collect together evidence of the value you deliver, for example, performance statistics or new business delivered or letter from satisfied customers.
  • Now is the time for you to show evidence of your competence in your application letter, CV and at interview. You will find lots of advice in other posts on this blog about how to do that. Show how you will fit the role and take particular care to tailor what you say to suit any new requirements.
  • Don’t presume you’ll get the job; there may be a limited number of opportunities. But do remind yourself regularly just how good you are. Be practical and realistic about the situation – now is the time to start doing those little extras like working late or volunteering for that new project. It is the time for your to reinforce the relationship you have with managers and not to show them your resentment.
  • It can be hard to deal with. And anger and resentment may not be something you get over quickly. If it is badly handled, I know from experience that it can taint your whole view of the organization. That may mean that it is impossible to see staying as a positive option. If you do decide to look for new work, it is better to leave on good terms. Try to understand what led the organization to this point and that there may have been no other options open.

Above all work on not seeing the situation as being about you personally. Do this even though the impact is very personal indeed. You may well benefit from talking things through with a counsellor or a career coach. Remember, I offer a free half hour’s coaching by phone or Skype. My contact details are below.

Other resources to help your job search

In the job market, there are always lots of useful techniques to learn or to refresh. From writing a modern CV to wooing at the interview, you’ll find lots of tips in my handy little pocket-book.

Stress-free Job Search
A concise and practical little workbook. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

A concise and practical little work book, it is for all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

Find this and my other books on my Amazon page at this link; http://ow.ly/BRSAL

Remember working with a career coach can really help both  job search and career resilience. Get in touch at the Facing a mid-career dilemmaemail address below – I offer a free half hour trial session by phone or Skype.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book your free 30 minute, no obligation, trial coaching session with Wendy Smith now at this Link 

Looking for Work is Tough

Looking for Work is Tough

Looking for work is tough. Job Search means you are in a process of change. And all change comes with some degree of pain. Even changes for the better come with some degree of loss – something gets left behind. 

Looking for work is tough. Even if you are looking while you are employed you will have doubts and uncertainties. You will need confidence. It is tough at any level and at any stage in your career. But in some ways I think it gets tougher as you move further up the professional or management hierarchy. The reputational risk is higher. You have more to lose even though you usually gain confidence as you rise. I provide life coaching as well as career coaching to my clients and I know that helps them be more successful in job search.

For most of us changing roles has implications for those close to us.

You may have the opportunity to earn more but perhaps the family will have to cope with you travelling a lot more and/or working longer hours. Some families may feel the extra money doesn’t make up for losing you. But how do you reconcile their wishes with your own professional ambitions and the kind of work you always dreamed of doing?

And then, of course, circumstances can change. Suppose someone close to you suddenly becomes much more dependent on you.? Say they develop a long-term illness. Yes, you can now pay for their physical needs to be met. But how do you now make time to meet their need for emotional support?

I’ve been thinking about what all this that means for me as a coach and kind of work I do. And I believe life coaching combined with career coaching can help you, as a client, deal with the kind of situations I describe above. If you want to get the best outcome for changes in your life, get in touch.

Wendy Smith is a Career Coach and Life Coach helping you find fresh perspectives on life and your career. Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book your free, no obligation, trial coaching session with Wendy Smith now at this Link

Positive Job Search

Positive Job Search

Advice from Wendy Smith; Career Coach and author of The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book – Wendy’s books on Amazon

Positive Job Search – a positive attitude is key to successful job seeking. Finding a job can be an uncomfortable ride. And I sometimes hear pretty outrageous stories about how people are treated in the recruitment process. Finding yourself without a job, in uncertain times, remains hard.

But if you are going to be successful, you need to get past the negativity. And you need to be ready to learn. Job search has changed radically in the last 10 years. Just think for a moment about the impact of social media. And you may need to do some studying to update your professional skills. You can’t afford to be complacent about your value in today’s job market. Nor can you afford to waste energy on a negativity.

Tips for Positive Job Search

  • Acknowledge any grief and anger for what they are and seek help if necessary from a coach or counsellor to overcome them.
  • Learn to live in the present – practicing Mindfulness can help here.
  • Work on staying physically fit with a good diet, exercise and rest.
  • Approach the job market with an open mind and be ready to learn how it works now. In particular learn to use LinkedIn – it is an invaluable job search tool.
  • Work on understanding the real value you bring and improve that if you can with study.
  • Treat the recruiting employer as a customer. Accept that success comes from understanding their needs and showing how you can meet them better than anyone else. Remember it is about what they think they want, not what you think they should want.
  • Be flexible in terms of the work you are prepared to consider.
  • Network as much as you can – remember lots of very good jobs never get to into the hands of recruitment companies.

I’ve worked with a number of clients who thought they had no chance of securing another good job. Now, they are now in work and happy. If I can do anything to help you, please get in touch.

Other resources to help your job search

In the job market, there are always lots of useful techniques to learn or to refresh. From writing a modern CV to wooing at the interview, you’ll find lots of tips in my handy little pocket-book.

A concise and practical little work book, it is for all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

Find this and my other books on my Amazon page at this link; http://ow.ly/BRSAL

Remember working with a career coach can really help both  job search and career resilience. Get in touch at the Facing a mid-career dilemmaemail address below – I offer a free half hour trial session by phone or Skype.

 

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book your free 30 minute, no obligation, trial coaching session with Wendy Smith now at this Link 

Energy For Your Job Search

Energy For Your Job Search

Advice from Wendy Smith; Career Coach and author of The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book – Wendy’s books on Amazon

You need energy for your job search – just as you do to complete any other project in your work life. It is all too easy when you are working from home – for job search as at other times – to lose the habits that help you stay healthy.

Energy for your job search; the basics

Most of us need seven or eight hours of good quality sleep to perform at our best. Sometimes I ask clients to keep a sleep diary so they can work out exactly how much sleep they need. They record the hours they slept and how the felt the next day. If you try it, you can pretty quickly work out what is the best sleep for you. Make sure your bedroom is comfortable, dark enough and quiet – this really isn’t the place for computers and televisions.

As your mother always told you; eat a good breakfast that sets up your energy levels for the day. Try making porridge and not buying packaged cereals full of sugar and add fruit to the tray.

Grazing on small, frequent meals is better for your system than eating large meals with a long break in between. Eat Energy For Your Job Searchunrefined complex carbohydrates like whole wheat with every meal. Cut back on tea, coffee, chocolate and canned drinks and drink lots of water to feel really good.

Make sure you get out of the house and into the fresh air each day. And have an exercise routine, even if it is just regular walking. A half hour walk each day will help to keep you healthy. Always take medical advice before starting a vigorous new exercise routine; perhaps this may be the time to start swimming again – it is great exercise and very inexpensive.

Other resources to help your job search

In the job market, there are always lots of useful techniques to learn or to refresh. From writing a modern CV to wooing at the interview, you’ll find lots of tips in my handy little pocket-book.

Stress-free Job Search
A concise and practical little workbook. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

A concise and practical little work book, it is for all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

Find this and my other books on my Amazon page at this link; http://ow.ly/BRSAL

Remember working with a career coach can really help both  job search and career resilience. Get in touch at the Facing a mid-career dilemmaemail address below – I offer a free half hour trial session by phone or Skype.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book your free 30 minute, no obligation, trial coaching session with Wendy Smith now at this Link 

Job references for those in the public sector

Job references for those in the public sector

Advice from Wendy Smith. Wendy is a Career and Life Coach helping you find fresh perspectives on life and your career.  You can book a FREE coaching session or find out more at this link

Job references for those in the public sector – many public sector organizations will only offer bland references as your employer.  You will need their reference.   But when it arrives it may only be a confirmation that you worked for them in a particular grade over a particular period of time.

Most large private sector employers know this – for others you may have to explain.  You will need something more.  Try asking your line manager or someone in your management line if they would be prepared to give you a personal reference as well as the one sent officially by HR.   Many managers are more ready than you expect to help. Also consider approaching retired senior colleagues and others who have left organisation.

You might consider asking for a personal reference from someone who holds a senior position in the private sector.  This is where people you have met during work in a voluntary capacity may be useful. Otherwise, consider people who you have met through clubs and associations.

You shouldn’t feel embarrassed about asking for a reference. Most people feel flattered to be asked But you should always give people the opportunity to say no and make quite clear that you will understand if they feel they simply don’t know you well enough to help.

Career coaches like me are around to help you thrive in difficult times. Get in touch at this link – I would like to discuss how I can help.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in helping people lead happier lives and feel more fulfilled. She has worked in management as well as coaching and personal development, as well as starting up her own businesses. That means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up a new business or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book a FREE coaching session with Wendy or find out more at this link

 

Stress-free Job Search

Stress-free Job Search

Advice from Wendy Smith; Career Coach and author of The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book – order on Amazon

Stress-free Job Search – looking for work is often a very stressful experience. This is particularly so if you haven’t chose to chosen to leave your job and/or you have searched for a job for a long time. But there are ways that you can cut that stress and here is some advice.

We feel stressed when we perceive a threat. If you are unemployed and worried about the future for you, and those you love, that certainly feels threatening.

The effects of stress

When we feel threatened, the nervous system responds by releasing a flood of stress hormones. These include adrenaline and cortisol. These hormones rouse the body for emergency action. Your heart pounds faster, muscles tighten, blood pressure rises, breath quickens, and your senses become sharper. These physical changes increase your strength and stamina, speed your reaction time, and enhance your focus. And they prepare you to either fight or flee from the danger at hand. This is helpful in an emergency and it can be helpful in raising performance temporarily. But if you stay in this state for too long damage can be caused to both your body and your mind.

Long-term exposure to stress can lead to serious health problems. And chronic stress disrupts nearly every system in your body. Among other things, it can raise blood pressure or suppress you immune system making you more vulnerable to infection, as well as increasing the risk of heart attack and stroke. Long term stress can even rewire the brain, leaving you more vulnerable to anxiety and depression.

Stress-free Job Search – here’s how you can limit the stress

Accepting that you are likely to suffer a degree of stress in job search, there are the ways you can limit the amount of stress you have to suffer. Here is how you get closer to stress-free job search

First, it can be helpful to have a regular routine to your day. This should be very much modelled on the working life pattern you are used to. But make sure you leave enough time in the day for regular meals and exercise. Then you can sharpen your time management skills so that you don’t feel overwhelmed by the challenges ahead. For example, set realistic goals, set regular progress reviews and adjust your goals as needed. Make and manage a priority to do list and block out time in your diary to work on particular parts of your job search project without interruption.

Keep perspective! When your job search is stressful, it can feel as if it’s taking over your life. To maintain perspective, talk to people you trust about the challenges you’re facing. They might be able to give insights or offer suggestions for coping. Sometimes simply talking about difficulties can relieve stress.

Take care of yourself

Take a break. Even a few minutes of personal time during your day can be refreshing. Don’t be afraid to take some breaks from your job search, just as you would at work. This could be the occasional long weekend or a short holiday, if you can afford it.

Have an outlet and set aside time for activities you enjoy. These could be walking, reading, socializing or pursuing a hobby.

Make sure you take care of yourself. So, include physical activity in your daily routine, get plenty of sleep and eat a healthy diet.

Don’t be afraid to seek help if none of the above is really helping and you continue to feel overwhelmed. Please consult your doctor, counsellor or coach for advice on how to cut the levels of stress in your life before it causes you real harm.

Stress-free Job Search – over the last year, I’ve worked with a number of clients who thought they had no chance of securing a good job again. That was a very stressful experience for them. They are now in work and happy.  So, if I can do anything to help you, please get in touch.

Other resources to help your job search

In the job market, there are always lots of useful techniques to learn or to refresh. From writing a modern CV to wooing at the interview, you’ll find lots of tips in my handy little pocket-book.

Stress-free Job Search
A concise and practical little workbook. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

A concise and practical little work book, it is for all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

Find this and my other books on my Amazon page at this link; http://ow.ly/BRSAL

Remember working with a career coach can really help both  job search and career resilience. Get in touch at the Facing a mid-career dilemmaemail address below – I offer a free half hour trial session by phone or Skype.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book your free 30 minute, no obligation, trial coaching session with Wendy Smith now at this Link 

How to impress your boss

How to impress your boss!

Career Development: How to Impress Your Boss

Advice from Wendy Smith; Career Coach and author of “How to Get On With the Boss” – order on Amazon

How to impress your boss – advice and tips. So you have been in the job for a while now.  And things are going okay.  You get on well with your team and you think the boss likes you.  But you don’t seem to have marked yourself out for promotion. You are reliable and you get the job done. But you don’t believe the boss thinks you are anything special.  What can you do?

Getting the job done is not enough!

First, being reliable and getting the job done are incredibly important.  Just, don’t expect promotion for them alone. If you want to mark yourself out, you need to go further. You need to show real interest in your job and in the organisation.

Show an Interest

Find out more about your sector and the developments within it. Make sure you know what is happening in other parts of the organisation.  What are your competitors up to? Do you know your customers and what is happening to them?

Come up with ideas

Based on what you have learned, look for opportunities to make suggestions for how you can do your own job better.  But also be ready to discuss improvements with the wider team and for the wider organization. Do you have a new, and more efficient, way of providing the service or product to customers or for a new service offering?

Get to know the boss

Getting your ideas accepted, means getting the boss to listen to you.  That means developing your relationship.  Find out more about your boss.  How do they like to work?  When is the best time to approach them?  What are they worried about now?  Find an opportunity to talk to the boss but to make sure you choose your moment carefully, and then make the most of your time.

How to impress your boss – have confidence

Remember most bosses like to spot talent and to promote from within.  Among other things, it is cheaper than advertising for someone from outside.  Make sure you are the person, your boss thinks about next time they have a more senior vacancy.

I offer a free half hour coaching session by phone or Skype that help you deal with your boss. Here is the booking link –  Book a half hour trial 

Other resources for people with problem bosses

As a coach I work with lots of people who have problems with their boss. So I wrote a little book to help them. You can help your boss help you – don’t be made unhappy, suffer stress and lose confidence because you cannot get on with the person in charge. Poor relationships at work can damage life at home as well as your career. My book can help.

Remember working with a career coach can really help you feel happier at work.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book your free 30 minute, no obligation, trial coaching session with Wendy Smith now at this Link 

 

A boss who panics

A boss who panics

Problems at work: tip on how to work with a boss who panics

Advice from Wendy Smith; Career Coach and author of “How to Get On With the Boss” – order on Amazon

A boss who panics – most people I know have worked for a boss who was subject to panic. Or at least in their view, the boss was someone subject to panic. Managers are human and being human they don’t always behave well. Good managers recognize this in themselves. They check how they are behaving and acknowledge when they need to make a change. Some managers do not. And for a number, panicking can become a habit, particularly if they feel insecure or lack confidence.

So, how should you respond?

Here are some tips on how to deal with a boss who panics.

1. Don’t join in the panic, but do show you want to help.
2. Get as much information as you can about the issue.
3. Make your own assessment – is this really is as urgent or as important as your boss is suggesting?
4. Be clear about priorities for the organization, your team and your role, as well as for key clients.
5. Are you the person best placed to handle the issue? If so, can you persuade your boss to delegate the task to you with occasional reports on progress?
6. Show you are willing to help.  Even if the issue isn’t for you, show you are willing to help and move things forward.
7. Agree clear arrangements for reporting back with your boss. Those reports may have to be more frequent than you would choose. But an agreed reporting procedure should reassure your boss and give you the space you need to complete the task.
8. Shield your team – if you are a manager yourself, then try to shield your team from the effects of your boss’s panic.
9. Reassure your boss – above all seek to reassure your boss and take responsibility for dealing with the issue if you can
10. Post action analysis – after dealing with the immediate problem, try to work out why your boss is responding in this way. Then, if you can, offer support, show loyalty and give reassurance.
11. Is the behavior really disrupting the team?  Do you have a good relationship with boss? Then afterwards try to feed back to you boss how this is affecting others and the efficiency of the group. But choose your moment with care. Don’t do it when they are feeling panicked. Offer to work with them to introduce any changes that will make them feel more comfortable.
12. If you don’t get on well with the boss, consider your options.  Consider seriously whether this job is really worth suffering the long-term effects of stress which are usually the result.

I offer a free half hour coaching session by phone or Skype that help you deal with your boss. Here is the booking link –  Book a half hour trial 

Other resources for people with problem bosses

As a coach I work with lots of people who have problems with their boss. So I wrote a little book to help them. You can help your boss help you – don’t be made unhappy, suffer stress and lose confidence because you cannot get on with the person in charge. Poor relationships at work can damage life at home as well as your career. My book can help.

Remember working with a career coach can really help you feel happier at work.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book your free 30 minute, no obligation, trial coaching session with Wendy Smith now at this Link 

 

Stand Out At Interview

Stand Out At Interview

Job Search: How to Stand Out From The Crowd

Advice from Wendy Smith; Career Coach and author of The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book – order on Amazon

Stand out at interview if you want to be successful. If you want to be offered that longed-for job, these days you need to do more than simply prove you can do the work. It is likely that you will be one among several candidates who can provide evidence of that.

So what can mark you out as that special candidate – the one they want?

I’ve spent a lot of time thinking about my experience as both interviewer and interviewee. I’ve come to the conclusion it all comes down to the three Es; enthusiasm, energy and engagement.

Stand out at interview – enthusiasm

It is great if a candidate shows they really care about my vacancy. I don’t want to feel that mine is just another on the long list they have applied for. If they are interested in my job, they will have done their home work and know about my organization, who our customers are and the sector we work in. They will be able to show me why they think this is a great opportunity for them.

Energy

I want to find a sense of resilience and energy. The successful candidate is going to be someone not likely to be daunted by the challenges ahead.

Engagement

Candidates who actively engage with the interviewer and the interview process put themselves at the head of the field. By that I mean someone who walks into the room with confidence and then takes part in a real discussion. Not someone who simply pours out information in response to the questions asked. Their body language will show real interest and they will keep up good eye contact. They will have high self-esteem without arrogance.

If you can show the three Es at your next interview, you are pretty much bound to make a good impression.

Other resources to help your job search

In the job market, there are always lots of useful techniques to learn or to refresh. From writing a modern CV to wooing at the interview, you’ll find lots of tips in my handy little pocket book.

Stand Out At Interview
A concise and practical little workbook. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

A concise and practical little work book. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

Find this and my other books on my Amazon page at this link; http://ow.ly/BRSAL

Remember working with a career coach can really help career resilience. Get in touch at the Facing a mid-career dilemmaemail address below – I offer a free half hour trial session by phone or Skype.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book your free 30 minute, no obligation, trial coaching session with Wendy Smith now at this Link