Why You Need Sleep and How to Get More of It

Why You Need Sleep and How to Get More of It

Why You Need Sleep

Many professionals strive to find a balance between work and home life. In an attempt to find balance, far too many people sacrifice a vital biological necessity—sleep. The average adult needs a full seven to eight hours of sleep to give their body time for full rejuvenation. Some may see that much rest as indulgent, but when you look at the facts, you’ll see it leaves the mind and body working at it’s best, which means you’re at peak performance.

Importance of Sleep

Sleep is more than time for your body and brain to relax. It’s when your energy reserves go to work repairing, restoring, and rejuvenating your body.

The Brain

The brain uses sleep to clear away the old connections you don’t need and strengthens the ones you do. With less than seven hours of sleep, messages from the brain start to slow down. The less sleep you get the slower your brain goes all in an attempt to get the body back to a resting state. You may think you’re okay with five or six hours of rest, but reaction times, decision-making skills, and reasoning abilities all begin to suffer.

Appetite

Your appetite and metabolism change during sleep deprivation as well. Hormones like ghrelin, which controls hunger, and leptin, which makes you feel full, get released in different amounts.  The result—you eat more. When you’re tired, you tend to eat more and crave high-fat, sugary foods that lead to weight gain.

Immune System

The immune system also suffers when you don’t get enough rest. Have you ever noticed that you feel achy and sore when you haven’t gotten a good night’s rest? It could be an old mattress, but it’s more likely you didn’t give your immune system enough time to do its work. Without enough sleep, inflammation increases and the immune system slows down, which means you can’t fight off infection as well.

How to Get More (and Better) Sleep

Many people struggle to get a full night’s rest because of stress, medical conditions, or a changing work schedule. Good sleep hygiene can help establish healthy circadian rhythms and let you get the sleep you need despite the challenges you may be facing.

Keep a Consistent Sleep Schedule

Go to bed at the same time every day, even weekends. The brain releases hormones to start the sleep cycle, and keeping a regular sleep schedule helps to regulate the release of those hormones. To further support better your circadian rhythms, try to wake up at the same time every day.

Create the Right Environment

While multipurpose rooms are efficient, the bedroom needs to be solely devoted to sleep. That way when it’s time to lay down for bed, the brain automatically begins to settle for the night. A comfortable mattress that supports your preferred sleep position, temperatures between 60-68 degrees, and a dark, quiet atmosphere can help you to not only fall asleep faster but stay asleep longer.

Eat Smart and Healthy

Avoid stimulants like caffeine at least four hours before bedtime. A light, healthy dinner eaten three to four hours before bed will prevent any discomfort that could keep you awake. If you need a light snack, try eating foods that support good sleep like dairy products rich in calcium or bananas, which are high in potassium. Both aid in the production of the sleep-inducing hormone melatonin.

Sara Westgreen is a researcher for the sleep science hub Tuck.com. She sleeps on a king size bed in Texas, where she defends her territory against cats all night. A mother of three, she enjoys beer, board games, and getting as much sleep as she can get her hands on.

When You Make A Mistake

When You Make A Mistake

Advice from Wendy Smith. Wendy is a Career and Life Coach helping you find fresh perspectives on life and your career.  You can book a FREE coaching session or find out more at this link

When you make a mistake remember that we all make mistakes! There isn’t a human being alive who hassn’t  – we all do. That is why, when people do work where accuracy is critical, systems are usually put in place to inspect and assure it.  And we make mistakes in all parts of our lives, not just at work.

So, when you make a mistake what do you do next?

Well I think the first big step is to accept you did make a mistake. Most of us are very good at coming up with excuses. Underneath we usually know the truth.

Once you have admitted to yourself what happened, you need to make sure that your mistake causes no further damage. Do whatever you can to put things right or at least make sure that what you did doesn’t cause any further harm. That can be difficult when the mistake is to do with wrong choices in a relationship at home or at work. At times like that it often helps to talk to a friend or to a coach like me.

When you make a mistake putting things right often means being ready to go on record and admit what you did.

Now, if you made a mistake you can put right quickly with no real damage, perhaps you won’t need to tell anyone. But what about the people you who deserve an apology, or those who need to learn from your mistake? Remember hiding a mistake at work that is later discovered is not the best career move.

Being ready to say sorry is really important. A sincere apology for an honest mistake makes a huge difference to the injured party and to your own self-esteem.

Usually, the most important part of handling mistakes is understanding why they happen. Mistakes can occur because you are tired, or perhaps you were distracted. Sometimes it is because you don’t really know what you are doing or because a system or a piece of equipment doesn’t work properly.  All those things can usually be understood easily and put right.

Sometimes, we make mistakes because we are unhappy.

Sometimes, we make mistakes because we are unhappy. We might make bad choices at work or in relationships for reasons deep within us to do with our emotions. And some of us just go on making those kinds of mistakes.

If you keep making the same mistakes, it is a good idea to seek help. There lots of counsellors and coaches around who will be happy to work with you. Take action now, your life is too precious to waste it going round in the same circle.

Career and life coaches like me are around to help you thrive in difficult time, Get in touch at this link – I would like to discuss how I can help.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in helping people lead happier lives and feel more fulfilled. She has worked in management as well as coaching and personal development, as well as starting up her own businesses. That means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up a new business or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book a FREE coaching session with Wendy or find out more at this link

 

Reapplying For Your Own Job

Reapplying For Your Own Job

Career Development: When You Have to Reapply For Your Own Job

Advice from Wendy Smith. Wendy is a Career and Life Coach helping you find fresh perspectives on life and your career.  You can book a FREE coaching session or find out more at this link

Reapplying for your own job – far too many organizations now ask their staff to reapply for their own jobs.  Sometimes this is because there has been reorganization after, say, a merger.   And quite often it happens during downsizing on the pretext of reorganization. Whatever the reason, it usually causes anger, frustration and just plain fear among employees. It is certainly not the best way to keep up morale.

If it is your job on the line, how do you go about surviving the storm?

Well, first, telling the company exactly what you think of what they are doing isn’t going to help your application. Instead, it is better to vent in private with someone who you really trust.  While at work try to stay positive to make the best of a difficult situation.

Reapplying for your own job –  now is the time to prove your worth

Don’t make assumptions about your value to the organization. Now is the time to prove your worth.  Don’t assume that all the good things you have contributed have been registered; you need to make sure you get them on the record.

Recognise the reality of the situation. Your job is on the line and you are in competition. Do not start to play dirty tricks but recognise that in this kind of climate others might feel free to do so. Keep your wits about you while still trying to be a good team player. (Nobody said this was easy).

Work on polishing up your CV/resume to show the value you have added and the contribution you have delivered. Quantify your results and include hard facts about delivery.  Make sure you show your competence and contribution fully.

Target your CV to the new job

Target your CV to the new job just as you would when applying from outside the organization.  If you need to offer a cover letter make sure you enthuse about future possibilities.  If it is a completely new role show how your skills are transferable and say why you want that role in particular even if it is the only one available – show how you can meet their needs.

It may be hard to do but work on your relationship with managers who are going to be part of the future organization.

At the end of the day, if you can’t come to terms with this all this, then it might be better to move on and seek new opportunities in a new organization. But even If you decide to leave it is still in your long-term interest to stay on good terms with your managers.

Sorry this isn’t the pleasantest topic to think about and some of the advice above may be uncomfortable.  You have to make your ow judgement about just how important having this job is to you and how far you are prepared to go to stay around.

Career ciaches like me are around to help you go through this kind of process. We can help you to thrive in difficult time, Get in touch at this link – I would like to discuss how I can help.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in helping people lead happier lives and feel more fulfilled. She has worked in management as well as coaching and personal development, as well as starting up her own businesses. That means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up a new business or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book a FREE coaching session with Wendy or find out more at this link

 

Networking – Top 10 Tips

Networking Tips

Job Search and Career Development – Top 10 Networking Tips

Advice from Wendy Smith. Wendy is a Career and Life Coach helping you find fresh perspectives on life and your career. She is the author of The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book – find Wendy’s books on Amazon 

Networking Tips – whether you are looking for work or looking for promotion at work, knowing how to network and work a crowd is invaluable. So here are my top 10 tips.

1. First – find your crowd. Go to every likely event that you can. Even in these days of virtual communication, personal contact makes all the difference. The more networking events, professional conferences, job fairs, professional associations, senior meetings, board meetings and other gatherings you go to, the better your chance of meeting someone who can help you. Getting into meetings and events with senior staff at work gets you noticed.
2. Networking Tips – don’t let lack of confidence be a barrier. If you necessary go with a friend; if you are nervous of crowds take a willing friend along. It can be much easier to have a conversation when you’re not the only one trying to think of what to say. If you don’t have someone to bring, then find the out layer on the edge crowd when you get there and start a conversation. Ask how they got there, perhaps, and who do they know. The chances are they are as nervous as you and will be grateful that you spoke to them. Don’t be shy or embarrassed that you’re unemployed. So are millions of other good people.
3. Smile. Smiles are contagious and they show energy. The more you smile the more pleasant the reception you’ll get – people like people who smile.
4. Do your introduction. Prepare your short introduction/elevator speech before you get there and practice saying it.
5. Keep the conversation going. After you start a conversation by introducing yourself, keep up the momentum. It’s much easier to converse when you’re on first name terms with the person you are talking to – so exchange names. Then ask a question using their first name. Once you’ve said hello, ask the person you’re talking to about their job or their field of interest. Show a genuine interest in them and what they are doing – people usually love talking about what they do. If you ask an open-ended question like “What do you think about…” you’ll be able to keep the conversation rolling.
6. Be prepared to answer questions. If the person you’re talking to seems interested in you and asks questions – answer them fully and don’t be dismissive of what you have to offer. Be prepared to explain what qualifications and skills you have and what you are looking for. If you are in employment, be ready to talk about your job and make it interesting.
7. Give out your Business Cards. Have business cards printed with your contact information (name, address, phone, email, LinkedIn profile, etc.) and ready to hand out. That way it’s easy for people to get in touch with you. Keep in them in your pocket or the side of your bag so you can get to them without making a production out of it.
8. Get Business Cards and offer help if you can. If you’re at a professional function, collect business cards. Send a follow up email thanking the person for talking to you. Let them know you appreciate anything they can do to help. Offer to help and contacts if you can. “Giving to get” works every time. Offering to help someone else with their career goals or with job leads, will pay you back with more help than you might imagine.
9. Don’t monopolize the conversation. Spend a few minutes discussion learning about others and talking about your goals, then move on. The more people you talk to, the more opportunities you’ll have.
10. Networking Tips – Don’t Be Negative. People don’t like negativity, so don’t bad mouth your (old) job, your (old) boss and the company. Rather put a positive spin on your situation and your future plans.

Wendy Smith is a Career Coach and Life Coach helping you find fresh perspectives on life and your career. Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book your free 30 minute, no obligation, trial coaching session with Wendy Smith now at this Link

Resources to help your job search

In the job market, there are always lots of useful techniques to learn or to refresh. From writing a modern CV to wooing at the interview, you’ll find lots of tips in my handy little pocket-book.

A concise and practical little work book, it is for all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

Find this and my other books on my Amazon page at this link; http://ow.ly/BRSAL

Remember working with a career coach can really help both  job search and career resilience. Get in touch at the email address below – I offer a free half hour trial session by phone or Skype – email wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com to find out more

How to handle a jealous boss

How to handle a jealous boss

Advice from Wendy Smith. Career and Life Coach and author of How to Get on With the Boss . Wendy helps you find fresh perspectives on life and your career.  You can book a FREE coaching session with her or find out more at this link

Bosses, like all of us, come with a range of human emotions and one of jealous bossthem may be jealousy.  Given the number of visits to this post, I guess a lot of people think their boss might be jealous. So here is some advice on how to handle a jealous boss. Jealousy is usually shown in quite subtle ways in the early stages. Why not apply the jealous boss checklist below.

How jealousy might be shown – your jealous boss checklist

  • Have you been relegated to the dreary corner?
  • Do you always seem to be given the most boring work?
  • Are you often given just too much work?
  • May be, you are subject to sarcastic comments?
  • Your manager might just find fault with everything you do?
  • Or start to niggle away at a few small faults you do have?

If some of these apply to you, you need to know how to handle your jealous boss. Follow the advice below.

Jealous boss – steps to take

Jealous boss
Wendy has a concise and practical eBook on how to get on better with your boss. You can find it at this link http://amzn.to/2mshlVJ

First, directly confronting a jealous boss rarely works. Go carefully, particularly if you need to keep the job. It is sad, but in most organisations, unless there is a clear case of bullying, reporting your boss rarely turns out well. The benefit of the doubt will usually be given to the more senior party. Calling on the support of senior contacts against your boss might well rebound. They may not thank you for the information. They may value your boss for his/her technical abilities and your boss may have an otherwise good record.

Hard as it sound, the best approach is usually to make your boss feel you are on their side. They need to believe that, even though you might have it in you to upstage them, you will never do so. They need to feel that you really will support them.

Show your boss that you respect their ability.

Show your boss that you respect their ability. And ask for their advice. It might be difficult for you at first because you feel that you too are an expert. But it will help to build your relationship.

Make sure you try to make your boss look good. Be ready to share your ideas. Accept that sometimes your ideas might be presented as theirs.  If you have contacts higher up the office, be ready to share them with your boss. And, if your boss has unsung talents, make sure your senior contacts know about them.

If you do find yourself relegated to the dreary corner, see what you can do to brighten things up. In most kinds of work, there is some opportunity to make a positive mark if you look for it.

Overall – keep your dignity but turn yourself into an asset for your boss, and not a threat.

If despite all this jealousy turns into out-and-out bullying there are legal steps you can take to seek redress. Talk to an external adviser like your union official, Citizen’s Advice in the UK or even an employment lawyer about action to take.

More advice on how to handle your jealous boss

There has been a lot of interest in this subject and I’ve received lots of questions. So, I’ve written a concise and practical eBook on how to get on with the boss. In it you will learn how to make a great first and lasting impression at work. You will find out how to help your boss help you. Don’t be made unhappy, suffer stress and lose confidence because you cannot get on with the person in charge. Poor relationships at work can damage life at home as well as your career. There can be long-term effects on health and on your motivation.  My little eBook can really help you avoid the pitfalls and build a strong, positive, relationship with your boss. There is more on the eBook below but here is a quick link http://amzn.to/2mshlVJ

My book, How To Get On With The Boss, covers;

•What it means to get on with the boss
•Why it matters
•How to know whether you get on with your boss
•Getting it right
•What your boss really wants
•How requirements can change over time
•Making a good first impression
•Keeping respect once you are experienced in the role
•What to do when things go wrong
•Bosses with problems
•Demon bosses
•Putting things right
•Moving on when it is time to go
•Bullying

Here is a link to the book http://amzn.to/2yS02Dj

And if you would like a coach to support you as you deal with your boss, please get in touch.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in helping people lead happier lives and feel more fulfilled. She has worked in management as well as coaching and personal development, as well as starting up her own businesses. That means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up a new business or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. 

Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book a FREE coaching session with Wendy or find out more at this link

 

Panic at work – When Panic Becomes the Norm at Work!

Panic at work – When Panic Becomes the Norm at Work!

Advice from Wendy Smith. Wendy is a Career and Life Coach helping you find fresh perspectives on life and your career. She is the author of The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book – find Wendy’s books on Amazon 

Panic at work –  a few years ago I worked for an organization where panic was the cultural norm. This meant that if people were not running round the corridors screaming at each other about what needed to be done, the boss thought something was wrong. It was as if he assumed we were all too stupid to understand the priorities or we were just plain lazy.

That panic at work culture led to lots of unhappiness and a significant amount of bullying. On top of that, the quality of the work delivered was never better than just good enough and often not that. Given this was a finance section responsible in those days for overseeing huge budgets, the results were pretty disastrous. People were made illby the stress.

I went into the section with a reputation as a good manager. But I lacked the confidence necessary to hold out against the culture. By the end of six months, I was panicking and shouting at people too.

One day the consequences were brought home to me in a way that is still painful to remember. At a performance review, a member of my team had the courage to tell me the effects the bad behaviour was having on him. I have never felt more ashamed.

Panic at work – changing the culture needs confidence

His courage gave me the confidence to face my manager about the climate at work. He didn’t like hearing it and he didn’t want to change. In the end, and with threats of my moving on, he agreed to try another way. It wasn’t easy for him but he made the effort. And we were lucky that the team gave us the benefit of the doubt and were willing to work with us. The results were impressive and we never went back to “running round like headless chickens”.

Perhaps you work in an organization that hasn’t learned the same lesson. What is it like to work there and what is the effect on you and your own standards? Don’t wait as long as I did to accept that change is needed. Do what you can to bring about that change.

If you can’t bring about change, consider moving on. Do you really want to share responsibility for the harm it is causing you and the people round you?

If you need help to bringing harmony back to your life at work, please get in touch.

Wendy Smith, Career Coach and Life Coach

Wendy Smith is a Career Coach and Life Coach helping you find fresh perspectives on life and your career. Need help finding work, with problems at work, at home or with relationships? Book your free 30 minute, no obligation, trial coaching session with Wendy Smith now at this Link

Resources to help your job search

In the job market, there are always lots of useful techniques to learn or to refresh. From writing a modern CV to wooing at the interview, you’ll find lots of tips in my handy little pocket-book.

Panic at work

A concise and practical little workbook. For all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

A concise and practical little work book, it is for all who have the courage to go out and learn the new skills necessary to find a job now.

Find this and my other books on my Amazon page at this link; http://ow.ly/BRSAL