Forming the Team: Tuckman Part 1

Forming the Team: Team Work 101

Forming, Storming, Norming, Performing and Adjourning.

Tuckman Part 1 – Managing the Forming Stage

Forming the team is an essential part of the Tuckman model of how groups/teams Forming the teamdevelop. Most groups go through a formation process like that described by Dr Tuckman. If you understand the model it can help you to lead, manage and facilitate teams and work groups more effectively.

Some group leaders find the stages uncomfortable – they can be challenging to handle. Some stages seem slow and a waste of precious work time. But if you go through them, it means a more cohesive and efficient work-group is formed – a group that allows everyone to contribute their best!

A skilled manager can observe the stages happening and help the process along. That means you get the best outcome for all in the least time.

In a short series of posts, I’m going to discuss how you can lead your group through the stages to achieve a good result. You can find the second post in this series on Stage 2 Managing Storming Teams at this link.

Forming the team

When they first come together in a group, people are cautious.  Usually, they want to get to know each other and get on with the task.  But, they might be a bit anxious.  They are usually tentative and tend to check each other out. Generally, they are polite and somewhat reserved.

The group wants to work out how they should behave.  At this stage, they are not likely to challenge each other or you, as their leader. They want to understand properly why they are there – what is the task and what is this really about?  The group wants to know what they are being asked to do and how they are expected to do it.

No one feel very comfortable. Perhaps there any hidden agendas.

They are looking for the “ground rules”.

This stage can feel frustrating for the leader, because things can feel as if they are moving very slowly.

Lead the group through forming the team

So what can you do?  Well, you need to provide a safe environment in which the group can operate and you need to set some goals for them to achieve.

But let then have some time to get to know each other! Therefore, allow people an opportunity to share their hopes and their anxieties.  You might recognise now why trained facilitators put so much store by ice-breakers.

If you pace the group carefully, they will move through forming the team and not get stuck.  Encourage them all to contribute.

What if they get stuck in Stage 1 – Forming the Team

If they get stuck then you will need to become more directive.

  • Involve them in setting the goals
  • Let them air their reservations.
  • Get those ground rules out in the open air
  • Get people to agree the ground rules.
  • Support anyone who shows reticence so that their confidence develops.

Then stand by because you need to go through Stage 2 Storming before the real work begins. Stage 2 can be turbulent. Information on how to handle that stage will follow here shortly.

Other posts on the Tuckman model are to follow.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

Coaching Online: Advantages and Disadvantages

Coaching Online: Advantages and Disadvantages

coaching online

Coaching online has advantages but also some disadvantages. I was asked a little while ago about providing coaching online. So, I thought you might be interested to read my answers

Interviewer: How do you communicate with clients online? What are the strengths and limitations of each approach?

Wendy: I use three different ways of communicating with clients on line. So, I use phone/skype, email and instant messaging.

Phone or Skype

The strengths of telephone coaching include convenience and comfort for the client. They are able to receive coaching where they choose.  For most, this will be at home or somewhere else familiar to them. So, they do not have to add travel to a coaching location to the end of a busy working day. Phone can also provide privacy for those who feel shy and exposed sharing intimate feelings.  The disadvantage of the phone is that we have to work without visual clues. Therefore we are not able to see each other’s body language. So, authenticity and trust is important.

Email

The major disadvantage of email is that it is asynchronous. It can take time to get a reply.  With coaching online, both coach and client need to achieve agreement about when replies can be expected. Also, how privacy will be managed. The initial relationship can be much harder to establish. It requires patience from both coach and client.  As well as being able to choose the location and time for talking, there another a major advantage for email. Both the client and the coach have a record they can refer to. Plus you can take time to reflect on what you want to write.

Instant Messaging

Communicating by instant text messages is quick.  Again, the client can choose location they write from. But there can be issues of privacy if other people have access to the same computer or phone.

In my own coaching practice, the phone is my main method of communicating with clients.  I usually combine this with email between sessions. Plus I use a little instant messaging.

Interviewer:  In your opinion, what elements need to be in place in order to create a coaching relationship online? In what ways does this differ from face-to-face coaching?

Trust

Wendy: Coaching online or off requires an agreement between the coach and client about the service to be provided. And, for on line coaching this is a priority. Both coach and client need the right environment in which to work! They need privacy and the opportunity to develop trust. This is in each other as well as in the medium. Confidentiality of information shared is very.  Both need to understand the risks. Plus what coaching on-line cannot provide.

The coach and client are rarely in the same physical space.  Both need to be comfortable. And they need know that they will not interrupted. This can be difficult with a computer on the kitchen table. The coach and client both need to know they cannot be over-looked or over-heard. Plus, they need to be confident in using the machinery. The equipment needs to be reliable with good security cover.

Agreement

With phone coaching, you need to agree not only what time you will ring but also who calls whom and on what number. Before beginning a conversation, a coach needs to move very quickly into active listening.

In using email, there needs to be clear agreement about turnaround times. The client needs to understand that messages can sometimes go astray. Special arrangements need to be made for the coach’s absence. For example, when the coach goes on holiday.

With instant messaging the use of language needs to be particularly careful. The culture from  which the client  communicates may be important – for example when working with young clients. The coach may have to learn a whole new language.

For me the advantages vastly outweigh the disadvantages massively. I’ve run a successful coaching practice online for several years now.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

Wednesday Quotes Inspire Your Job Search

Wednesday Quotes Inspire Your Job Search Wednesday quotes

Our Wednesday quotes really will inspire and motivate you job search

Wednesday quotes to energise!

  • Whenever you are asked if you can do a job, tell ‘em, ‘Certainly I can!’ Then get busy and find out how to do it. Theodore Roosevelt
  • Our work is the presentation of our capabilities. Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
  • Never give up. No matter how many times you tried, or how many times you failed, always keep trying and always believe. Author Unknown
  • Each time we face a fear, we gain strength, courage, and confidence in the doing. Author Unknown
  • Success comes from taking the initiative and following up… persisting… What simple action could you take today to produce a new momentum toward success in your life? Tony Robbins
  • One important key to success is self-confidence. An important key to self-confidence is preparation. Arthur Ashe

    You’re braver than you believe, and stronger than you seem, and smarter than you think. Christopher Robin

  • One of the best things you can do when the world is storming around you is to pause. Mitch Thrower
  • Good luck happens when preparedness meets opportunity  Bret Harte
  • Our greatest weakness lies in giving up. The most certain way to succeed is always to try just one more time.  Thomas A. Edison
  • Do not let what you cannot do interfere with what you can do. John Wooden
  • Believe in yourself and all that you are. Know that there is something inside you that is greater than any obstacle. Christian D. Larson
  • “Take risks: if you win, you will be happy; if you lose, you will be wise.  Author Unknown
  • Many of life’s failures are people who did not realise how close they were to success when they gave up. Thomas Edison
  • Take the first step in faith. You don’t have to see the whole staircase, just take the first step. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

Creating a Sense of Urgency

Creating a sense of urgency

Leading Change the Kotter Way

Creating a sense of urgency is Step One in the well-established Kotter model of leading change.  But what exactly does that mean?

After 30 years of research, Dr John Kotter believes that most major change initiatives fail mainly because organisations don’t commit to seeing the change through and don’t take a holistic approach throughout.   He has demonstrated that his 8 step process provides the most credible way of delivering and embedding large-scale organisational change.

His method elaborates and enlarges upon Lewin’s simple Freeze Phase, three stage approach – square, blob, star.  The underlying principles are the same. The model is based on research which showed that there are eight critical steps an organization or service needs to go through to ensure that change happens and sticks. This series of posts considers these steps in greater detail. we have already reissued;  Step Two: Forming a Powerful CoalitionStep Three Creating a Vision for Change and Step Four: Communicating Your Vision.

You have to work really hard

When I put the words ‘creating a sense of urgency’ into a search engine, I came up with all kinds of great ideas!  For example,  inspiring the team to work together towards a goal!  Lots of pleasant and positive stuff. Sounds good doesn’t it –  makes you feel good!  The problem is that, sadly, these positive ideas don’t work if you want to make fundamental change in an organisation.

Kotter reckons that for change to be successful, 75% of a company’s management needs to “buy into” the change. In other words, you have to really work hard on Step One, and spend significant time and energy creating a sense urgency, before moving onto the next steps. Unfortunately, there are no pleasant and easy answers.

It is hard to persuade groups of people to move a long way out of  their comfort Creating a sense of urgencyzone!  They will not move unless they understand that staying where they are is not an option! That means convincing them that staying where they are is going to be painful, or is simply no longer possible.

As my old lecturer in change management said somewhere back in the 90s – unless the pain of staying where you are is greater than the pain of moving, you usually stay put! He started the lecture with a picture of an amoeba and gave us a lecture on the fundamentals of stimulus! He was pretty focused on the importance of creating a sense of urgency. Without it, there would be no fundamental change!

So what can you do for your group?  It isn’t as simple as just showing them the sales figures, or other written evidence of need, and expecting them to respond.  You need to work with them. Go through the figures and then help them think through the consequences of doing nothing! Make it real. Not just consequences for the organisation, but for them. Help them to ask; “What will it mean for me in six months if nothing changes?”

Let them understand and absorb the threat. Then, work with them to think through options for the future and how they can move forward.

Share the pain and then show how you can share the gain.

Show them what they have to  gain from making a change. This may not be much but there will always be something! If the facts mean potential redundancies, work out how can you work together to mitigate the effects.

Are there new working patterns that you can adopt, for example, flexible or short-time working? Are there new markets to explore. What do they know about that might be helpful?

But, be careful. There is a difference between sharing the pain so that together you can make a change  and creating panic. There is a big difference between creating a sense of urgency and throwing things into chaos.

Do your homework before you start.

You are the leader and you need to remain in the leadership seat. Keep your nerve. It won’t be easy but then no one said being a leader was easy! Prepare well – you will face some challenging questions!

Don’t be naive! When they leave your meeting or presentation, the rumour mill will get to work. So, follow up with good information. Keep the communications flowing about your plans. Always be prepared to answer questions and be available. There will be some questions afterwards that they wished they’d asked at the meeting.

If you have experience of creating a sense or urgency, please share your war stories.  If you have a change to make – I hope things go very well for you! In the meantime if you need help please get in touch, I’ve been there before you.

Meanwhile…

Here is a Kotter Reading List for you;

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

Leading Change – Creating a Powerful Guiding Coalition

Creating a Powerful Guiding Coalition

Leading Change the Kotter Way

Creating a powerful guiding coalition is perhaps the most challenging element of the Kotter model. I’ve written quite a bit here about the Kotter approach to leading change and I am in process of revamping my original Kotter model series.  This post deals with that difficult Stage Two; forming a powerful coalition to lead and manage the change. Links to the other stages are in the next paragraph.

After 30 years of research, Dr John Kotter believes that most major change initiatives fail mainly because organisations don’t commit to seeing the change through and don’t take a holistic approach throughout.   He has demonstrated that his 8 step process provides the most credible way of delivering and embedding large-scale organisational change. This series of posts will consider his steps in greater detail. we have already reissued; Step One: Creating Urgency, Step Three: Creating a Vision for Change and Step Four: Communicating Your Vision.

His method elaborates and enlarges upon Lewin’s simple Freeze Phase, three stage approach – square, blob, star.  The underlying principles are the same.

In a world requiring ultimate flexibility, an organisation’s ability to deal successfully with change is a key ingredient in its overall success.

Step Two – Creating a Powerful Guiding Coalition

No one person, however competent, is capable single-handedly of completing all the tasks required in leading a large organisation through change. The tasks include;

  • developing the right vision,
  • communicating it to vast numbers of people,
  • eliminating all of the obstacles,
  • generating short-term wins,
  • leading and managing dozens of change projects
  • anchoring new approaches deep in an organisation’s culture.

Putting together the right people to lead and manage  the change is critical to its success. It needs visible support from key people through-out your organisation. You must find the right people, instil in them a significant level of trust and develop a shared objective.

Those people need to have the right credibility within the organisation.  Otherwise things will go limp and the change will simply go to pieces and fritter away. This will leave the organisation weaker than it was before.

Create a  team of leaders and managers that can act in concert and make productive decisions. The decisions need to be taken seriously by all the group! Managers in the team will keep the process under control, while leaders drive the change. Some times people can both lead and manage but don’t assume you will find both talents in the same people.

An effective guiding coalition

An effective guiding coalition should have;

  • Position Power:  Enough key players on board so that those left out cannot block progress.
  • Expertise:  All relevant points of view should be represented so that informed and intelligent decisions can be made.
  • Credibility:  The group should be seen and respected by all so that the group’s pronouncements will be taken seriously by others.
  • Leadership:  The group should have enough proven leaders able to drive the change process.

Creating a powerful guiding coalition means the team needs to develop trust in one another. They need a shared goal so that they can make the needed change happen, despite all of the forces of inertia and resistance they may find.

Meanwhile…

Here is a Kotter Reading List for you;

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

 

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

Leadership Theories – Three Levels of Leadership model

Leadership Theories – The Three Levels of Leadership Model

Three Levels of Leadership

Leadership theories abound. The Three Levels of Leadership model was introduced in a 2011 book; The Three Levels of Leadership: How to Develop Your Leadership Presence, Know-how and Skill, by James Scouller.

the-three-levels-leadership-model, leadership theories

This leadership model is designed as a practical tool for developing a person’s leadership presence. Plus, as well as, their know-how and skill. It summarises what leaders need to do. This is not only to bring leadership to their group or organisation. But also to develop themselves as leaders.

The Three Levels of Leadership model combines the strengths of older leadership theories. These include the traits, behavioural/styles, situational and functional models.  It addresses their limitations. And, it offers a foundation for leaders who want to apply the philosophies of servant-leadership. Hence, it is for those who are committed to “authentic leadership”.

This approach is often classified as an “Integrated Psychological” theory of leadership. And it is sometimes known as the 3P model. The three Ps stand for Public, Private and Personal leadership.

The first two levels – public and private leadership

The first two levels, public and private leadership, are “outer” or “behavioural” levels. Scouller distinguishes between influencing two or more people at the same time. This is what he calls “public leadership.” It is distinguished from selecting and influence individuals one to one. Therefore, influencing people one to one he calls private leadership.

So, he lists 34 distinct “public leadership” behaviours.

The third level – personal leadership

The third level is personal leadership. This is an “inner” level. And it concerns a person’s leadership presence, know-how, skills, beliefs. It includes their emotions and unconscious habits.

At its heart is the leader’s self-awareness, his progress toward self-mastery and technical competence, and his sense of connection with those around him. It’s the inner core, the source, of a leader’s outer leadership effectiveness.” (Scouller, 2011).

Therefore, he lists 14 “private leadership” behaviours.

Finally, the idea is that if leaders want to be effective they must work on all three levels in parallel.

Wendy Smith is a career, life and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can book a discussion with Wendy about your coaching needs and your personal development at this link

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

When Panic Becomes the Norm at Work!

When Panic Becomes the Norm at Work!

panicWork panic is more common than you may realise.

A culture at work that accepts panic as normal leads to lots of unhappiness and stress. Your quality of work falls and often it is a home for bullies.

Many moons ago I worked for an organization where panic was the cultural norm. If people were not running round the corridors screaming at each other about what needed to be done, the boss thought they were too stupid to understand the priorities. If not that, then he thought they lacked motivation.

That culture led to lots of unhappiness and a significant amount of bullying. On top of that, the quality of the work delivered was never better than just good enough and often not that. Given this was a finance section responsible in those days for overseeing huge budgets, the results were pretty disastrous.

The experience of panic

I went into the section with a reputation as a good manager who was capable of first rate work. But I lacked the confidence necessary to reject the culture. By the end of six months, I was panicking and shouting at people too.

One day the consequences were brought home to me in a way that is still painful to remember. At a performance review, a member of my team had the courage to tell me what effect my behaviour, as his manager, was having on him. I have never felt more ashamed.

His courage gave me the confidence to confront my own manager about the climate he and I had created. He didn’t like hearing it and he didn’t want to change. In the end, when I threatened to move, he agreed to try another way. It wasn’t easy for him but he made the effort and we were lucky that the team gave us the benefit of the doubt and were prepared to work with us. The results were impressive and we never went back to “running round like headless chickens”.

What about you?

Do you work in an organisation where panic is the norm? What is it like to work there and what is the effect on you and your own standards? Don’t wait as long as I did to accept that change is needed. Do what you can to bring about that change.

If you can’t bring about change, then move on. Think whether you will want to look back and remember this experience. Do you really want to share responsibility for the harm it can cause you and the people round you?

If you need help handling a problem at work please get in touch. Remember I offer a trial free half hour coaching session by phone or Skype.

Wendy Smith is a career, life and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can book a discussion with Wendy about your coaching needs and your personal development at this link

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

Personal Development Mindset: Having One Is Important

Personal Development Mindset

What is a personal development mindset?

Having a personal development mindset means that you take responsibility for understanding yourself as an individual and for identifying and developing your

Personal development mindset sets your compass

own strengths and talents. It means you take control and become responsible for your own life and what you make of it. You begin to manage your own success and happiness. But you can receive support from others in developing the mindset and in helping you to develop yourself.

Personal development includes understanding your values and living in accordance with them. This in turn helps to strengthen your self-image and self-esteem. Then, you begin to be able to see your own potential and you can work towards fulfilling it, in your both your work and in your home life.

Personal development enables you to;

  • Expect to succeed in your own terms,
  • Take risks that are right for you and set challenging goals,
  • Keep working patiently until you reach your goal.

Having a personal development mindset means you are;

  • Optimistic about the future even in hard times
  • Self-confident and believe in your own abilities
  • A self-starter who takes action – there can be no success without action
  • Open to new ideas wherever they come from
  • Someone who values yourself and your special contribution
  • Abundant in your thinking – it is all out there waiting for you
  • Someone who knows how to influence others for the good of all
  • Patient – you know worthwhile things are worth waiting for
  • A student – you continue learning throughout your life
  • Prepared to question yourself and respond to your own self-review

It sounds aspirational doesn’t it? But it is something worth working towards and, if you wish we can work together on its development!

Wendy Smith is a career, life and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can book a discussion with Wendy about your coaching needs and your personal development at this link

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

Bad Leadership; the abuse of power

Bad Leadership

Bad leadership and the abuse of power! A leader can use his or her power to help others. But, of course the leader can also gain personally.  In bad leadership, the obvious problem is that when self-interest rules, the leader gains but often at the followers’ expense.

Bad leadership, the deluded leader!

The dangerous thing is that leaders can begin to delude themselves about bad leadership.  They start to believe that the rules that govern what is right and what is wrong, do not apply to them. They no longer have the best interests of their followers at heart.

Leaders can become “intoxicated” by power. They begin to do something unethical or take an unreasonable risk – just because they can!  In bad leadership, they can become addicted to the adrenaline rush. Followers may begin to collude – it is OK; “He’s the boss!”

I’ve seen this kind of thing happen several times in large organizations and not always at top-level.

Sometimes it is someone in an unchallenged leadership position in a particular division.  They are getting results so those further up the line choose not to ask questions.  Sometimes, it is someone with particular intellectual capital (the subject matter expert). Or a scarce talent! Again it can be easier for “management” to look the other way.

Abuse of power can hapen anywhere

It does not happen just in large organisations.  Abuse of power can happen anywhere! Eventually, the organisation suffers either in terms of legal challenge or financial loss from poor decision-making.  The reputational loss can be considerable!

It happens less in organisations with resilient governance arrangements. Or in those bodies whose top leaders set an example of ethical and compassionate leadership.

But I fear that the present economic circumstances, a climate may be created in which the abuse of power is more not less likely to take place.

On the positive side, of course, power makes leaders more assertive and confident.  They feel more certain of their decisions. This enables them to move forward towards their vision.

At the end of the day leaders and manager must be given the power to “get the job done.” But I’d welcome your views on how best to keep this to a healthy balance!

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

 

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

Your Personal Brand Checklist

Your Personal Brand Checklist

Your personal brand checklist will ensure the world sees you as you wish. It will help you reflect your personal brand in all you do. Everything, from the comments you make on Twitter to the way you dress, strengthens or weakens the way the you are seen! Here is your personal brand checklist.

personal brand checklist
Your checklist
  1. Are you sure people believe you know what you are talking about? First of all, does your resume reflect the real depth of your experience – is it up to date? Do the words you use at work reflect the latest thinking on your subject at this point in time? Do you write articles and blog posts on your specialist interest?

What about your “elevator speech”?

2. Can you deliver a succinct description of what you do, how you do it differently, plus the benefit it delivers? Can you say your piece within the time that it takes an elevator to travel one floor?

3. Are you a convincing communicator? Do people believe what you say? Can you influence people? Why not do a market survey? So, you could choose three people you trust and ask them what they think!  Why not, read a book about it, take a class or work with a coach like me.

4. Do you dress for the job at work? Because you do need to know the dress code for your sector? And you would be wise to follow it for success. But what about off duty? If you met you boss in the supermarket, what impression would they get? Think about what is appropriate to the situation. And balance your individual style with clothing that will appeal to those you are trying to impress.

Do you know how to behave at work?

5. By that I mean the etiquette for your organisation and your sector? What kind of business cards do people carry? Most of all, always be courteous. Therefore, always be the one who follows up and says thank you after a kind deed. Remember to do it after sector and professional events.

6. Do you know the people you need to impress? Take time out to build your address book. Collect business cards – make sure yours reflects your image properly! When you have built your relationship, ask contacts for further introductions. Use LinkedIn to find new people.

How often do you nurture your network?

7. Are you working at nurturing your relationships with your contacts? Most of all, are you showing an active interest and do you genuinely care care about them? Ask how they are and what they are doing. But make sure you mean it.  Remember things they tell you – note them down if you need to!

8. What do you do with your spare time? Do you give something back to the community with voluntary work? Or perhaps you help your local sports club? You don’t need to brag about it; news does get around!

Your personal brand is precious. It’s the you the world sees and judges by. Nurture your brand and you will nurture both your life and your career.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link