Advance Your Career – Three Great Tips

Advance Your Career – Three Great Tips 

Do you want to advance your career? Are you looking out for a career shift? Want to explore a whole new career path? If your answer is yes, then you’re probably overwhelmed with the idea of starting from scratch. But don’t worry, it’s not as complicated as you think it is. In order to make this new career change a work for you, you not only have to define your career success, but also know how to make yourself attractive to potential employers. In the following article we look into a few tips on how you can advance your career the right way…

#1: Know How You Want Your New Career to Shape

Being clear about what you want out of your professional work life will help you immensely in shaping your career the right way. Right from focusing on what skills you want to use or develop, to people you will interact/engage with as customers and colleagues, you should be clear about everything.

Regardless of what future career your choose to go with, you have to have a sharp and clear understanding of what you want from it. The idea here is to make your new career more interesting, inviting and comfortable for you. This may require you to move a little bit out of your comfort zone, but it will be worth it in the end. The career switch will be more satisfying and will help you focus in the right direction.

#2: Get Out there and Network Effectively

There are no hard and fast rules when it comes to finding work in a tough economy, but there’s one thing that you shouldn’t ignore and that is the power of networking. Finding a good job is not just about who you know, but also who knows you.

There are suitable jobs out there that fit your criteria, but you should be willing to roll up your sleeves and put in the efforts needed to find them. In other words, you have to be ready to take a chance by networking with new people to find a better and more satisfying new career. Don’t limit your networking to dinners or events – leverage social networking websites such as Facebook and LinkedIn to connect with new people.

#3: Go Back to School and Get an Advanced Degree

When it comes to securing the job of your choice, one of the key factors that you should focus on is differentiating yourself from the other candidates. Going back to school and earning an advanced degree or getting an industry specific certification will help you do just that. If you’ve got enough work experience and you want to accelerate your position in the business world, you could get an MBA degree from Sanford Brown. This way you’re accrediting yourself and networking at the same time.

Getting a degree not only bumps your credentials and helps you advance your career, it also helps in bridging any gaps in employment on your CV or resume. This makes you a better and much more attractive candidate in the eyes of the recruiter, increasing your chances of getting recommended to the hiring manager.

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Job Search Interview – When the Interview Went Wrong

Job Search Interview – When it Goes Wrong

Job Search Interview – so, you put lots of effort into preparing for that interview and you tried hard but somehow, something just went wrong. You know it and you suspect they know it too!

Perhaps you woke up not feeling well or something had  happened in your private life to distract you. Maybe something happened on the journey!.  Whatever it was, there something threw you off your best performance.  And now you feel bad about it.

Can You Get A Second Chance?

Well, here is the good news! Although not all, there are many employers who may be willing a give you the benefit of the doubt if you are well fitted in other ways.  Going back quickly, thanking them for the time they have spent on you already and explaining your circumstances may just do the trick.

Don’t go over the top but email or write to them briefly explaining what went wrong.  Make sure you emphasise your interest in the job and ask if it is possible to meet a second time or perhaps arrange a phone interview. Remind them of your referees and that they will be willing to confirm what a good candidate you are.

Set out again briefly why you really want this job and your interest in working for the organization and then sum up why you are particularly well fitted for the role. Don’t forget to remind them again of your contact details.

You have nothing to lose by giving it a try,  and much to gain.  Good luck.

Wendy Mason is the The Career Coach – helping you to find fresh perspectives on your Job Search and Career. She helps you work towards your goals and aspirations, in a way that fits in with both work and home life. Email her at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com,  find her on Skype at wendymason14, or call +44 (0) 2081239146 (02081239146 for UK callers) or +1 262 317 9016 if you are in the US.

A free trial/consultation allows you to try phone coaching from the comfort of your own home and without risk. Don’t forget to ask about the Summer Special Offer 

 

 

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Workplace Drug Testing and Drug Misuse at Work

Workplace Drug Testing and Drug Misuse at Work

Workplace drug testing – you may be interested to read this advice from the UK Health and Safety Executive

It is an offence under the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 for any person knowingly to permit the production, supply or use of controlled substances on their premises except in specified circumstances (e.g. when they have been prescribed by a doctor).

You should also be aware of duties under the Road Traffic Act 1988 and the Transport and Works Act 1992. Drivers of road vehicles must not be under the influence of drugs while driving, attempting to drive or when they are in charge of a vehicle. Certain rail, tram and other guided transport system workers must not be unfit through drugs while working on the system. The operator of such a system must exercise all due diligence to avoid those workers being unfit.

Key messages

Drug and other substance (e.g. solvent) misuse is everyone’s concern. In the context of work, not only does it damage the misuser’s health, but it can cost employers through absenteeism and reduced productivity. It may also increase the risk of accidents. Employers should adopt a substance misuse policy, in consultation with their staff. This policy should aim to support affected employees rather than punish them, though your policy must say that possession or dealing in drugs at work will be reported immediately to the Police. If an employee admits to being a drug user, your policy should seek to help them rather than lead simply to dismissing them.

Some employers have decided to adopt drug screening as part of their drug policy. If you think you want to do the same, think very carefully about what you want screening to do, and what you will do with the information it generates. It is also important to consider the drug testing process itself including the type of testing, how the sample is collected and the security of the sample from contamination. Advice has been prepared by the European Workplace Drug Testing Society link to external website (EWDTS) to ensure the drug testing process is reliable and accurate.

Drug screening by itself will never be the complete answer to problems caused by drug misuse.

You can find out more at these links:

 

Wendy Mason is the The Career Coach – helping you to find fresh perspectives on your Job Search and Career. She helps you work towards your goals and aspirations, in a way that fits in with both work and home life. Email her at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com,  find her on Skype at wendymason14, or call +44 (0) 2081239146 (02081239146 for UK callers) or +1 262 317 9016 if you are in the US.

 

A free trial/consultation allows you to try phone coaching from the comfort of your own home and without risk. Don’t forget to ask about the Summer Special Offer 

 

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Job Search: Asking For A Job Referral

Job Search: Asking For A Job Referral

When you are interested in a job and someone refers you, you can mention that asking for a job referralin your covering letter.  It will mean you start ahead of the field.  Having a referral is having a recommendation.

When you identify a job you wish to apply for check your network for contacts with the right connections. LinkedIn is great for this. And, if you can find someone who already works for the company you wish to apply to that is great.

As well as LinkedIn, you can also use tools like BranchOut which is a Facebook app. It helps you find your friends at companies you are interested in. Search by company name and you’ll see a list of your Facebook friends at the company. Then, you can approach them to  see if they are willing to help.

You can approach contacts in a number of ways

  • An old-fashioned letter,
  • an email message,
  • Sending a message on a networking site like LinkedIn or Facebook or by, for example, Skype.

It is usually better to ask in writing rather than by phone. That means your contact has time to think about your request and how they can refer you. It is fair to give them the opportunity to refuse. And that is easier to do in writing

When you ask someone to refer you, you are not asking for a reference letter.  But, they do need to know something about you to refer with confidence.  You can ask “Do you feel you know my work well enough to refer me for a job at your company?” Or, “Do you feel you could give me a referral?” That way, they have an out if they don’t feel comfortable. And, you can be assured that those who do refer you will be enthusiastic about your performance. They will write a positive letter or give you a strong endorsement.

You could always offer to provide an updated copy of your resume and information on your skills and experiences. This is so your contact has the right information to work with.

Don’t take it personally if your contact says no!

Don’t take it personally if your contact says no. There could be all kinds of reasons for their refusal and lots that have nothing to do with you.

But don’t feel diffident about making your request. People usually feel flattered to be asked. And if you are asked to make a referral, do your best to help. Though, don’t duck away from refusing if you don’t feel comfortable. Perhaps, you know the person they want to contact will not welcome the approach.

Remember, job search is about giving as well as getting, Build your network with generosity to others. That way you are likely to be remembered with kindness when you need help.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find her books on Amazon at this link

         

Being Good At Your Job

Being Good At Your Job

“Being good at your job requires much more than just being smart. Success in any career, job, or even task requires more than mere intelligence. Certainly book smarts can help but career advancement requires many things such as perseverance, good communication skills, flexibility, adaptability, and most of all, experience. From my perspective nothing can replace experience and good judgment. Maybe it’s because I’m a risk manager. The best risk managers don’t just rely on quantitative models but draw upon their experience and differentiate themselves through their judgment.” Andrea Pozzi, Managing Director, Citigroup

From Andrea Pozzi: Five Messages to My Younger Self About Career Advancement

If you would like some help in developing your career skills please get in touch. Successful leaders are modest enough to know that working with a coach really can make a difference.

Wendy Mason is the The Career Coach – helping you to find fresh perspectives on your Job Search and Career. She helps you work towards your goals and aspirations, in a way that fits in with both work and home life. Email her at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com,  find her on Skype at wendymason14, or call +44 (0) 2081239146 (02081239146 for UK callers) or +1 262 317 9016 if you are in the US.

A free trial/consultation allows you to try phone coaching from the comfort of your own home and without risk. Don’t forget to ask about the Summer Special Offer 

 

 

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Do you include a profile statement in your CV?

Do you include a profile statement in your CV?

Profile statement – A few thoughts on the value of including a short summary profile at the top of your CV!

This profile is sometimes called the career summary, personal profile statement, profile statement, resume summary, and summary of qualifications. All refer to profiling your key qualifications for a particular job on your résumé.

The profile sums up your skills and experience, and it can include your career goals. This is a part of your CV that you should certainly tailor to the particular needs of the specific job for which you are applying. These are the headline words that will flag up to a recruiter why you are right for the role.

Essentially, a profile is a very condensed and targeted version of a cover letter. And there are clear benefits to including a good one. It can help you stand out among the hundreds of applications companies receive. Most employers spend only a few seconds looking at your CV, and most of this time is spent looking at the top half of it. So, even if a potential employer reads only your profile (located directly beneath your name and contact information), they will still have a clear idea of how uniquely well fitted you are for the role.

In addition, your profile can include Keywords that will help your application get picked up by the recruiting management software that many companies use now use to screen applications.

Keep your profile concise – between one and four short sentences and you can use bullet points. Focus on the requirements for the job and what you have to offer. Overall, integrate your employment history and skills into the qualifications listed for the job – make sure right at first glance, you look like the best candidate.

Wendy Mason is the The Career Coach – helping you to find fresh perspectives on your Job Search and Career. She helps you work towards your goals and aspirations, in a way that fits in with both work and home life. Email her at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com,  find her on Skype at wendymason14, or call +44 (0) 2081239146 (02081239146 for UK callers) or +1 262 317 9016 if you are in the US.

A free trial/consultation allows you to try phone coaching from the comfort of your own home and without risk. Don’t forget to ask about the Summer Special Offer 

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How to network to find a job!

How to network to find a job!

How to network – job search networking is all about making connections with people. The people you want to contact are those who can either let you know about potential job openings or connect you with others who can tell you.

Networking means talking to everyone you know. This includes family, friends, neighbours, acquaintances, previous employers and colleagues, people you play sport with, local business people, the family solicitor or accountant—everyone. It doesn’t matter if you don’t know very many people. The people you do know might in turn know other people who have heard about a job opening.

Job search networking can be done at different levels. It can be a matter of having casual conversations with people you meet. Or you can make it an active and strategic campaign to contact people for ideas, suggestions and information.

Don’t be afraid to ask for help. People are usually happy to help if they can. You have nothing to lose by phoning or meeting with your contacts. If you don’t make the connection, you won’t be able to tell if the person has good information or knows about an upcoming job. If you do speak with them, you might just land that job, or hear about another that suits you better.

At worst you might feel a bit uncomfortable. But, being prepared will make the discussions easier.

How to Prepare For Job Search Networking

Make a list of all the people you know.

They don’t need to be friends, or even acquaintances; you just need to have enough of a common link with them to initiate a conversation. If you can pick up the phone and call them, for any reason, they are potential networking contacts.

Prepare what you are going to say

You don’t want to just ring people up and say, ‘I work in HR. Do you know of any jobs going?’ Before you phone anyone, note down the specific details of what you’re looking for and exactly the kind of help you think they might be able to give you. For example, say:
‘I’m looking for a role in training and development within the public sector or a not-for-profit organisation. [Government department] or [organisation name] would be the kind of place I’d like to work in. Would you know of any places, maybe smaller and more local, that might be looking for trainers?’

Contact the people on your list in a systematic way

Set yourself a goal—maybe you’re happy to spend all afternoon on the phone to people, and cross twenty off your list. Or maybe you just want to work through the list steadily, making three calls a day. If you find yourself losing enthusiasm, being less conversational and speaking more mechanically, it might be time to take a break.

Ask them for job leads

To make it easy for people to help you, ask them if they have any tips, leads or suggestions. Ask them if they know of any vacancies at all for a person with your skills. If they don’t, ask them to keep you in mind in case anything comes up. Most importantly, ask them if they can suggest anyone else you contact. Do they know someone else who might know about the kinds of jobs that you’re after? Do they know anyone who works for this or that company that you’re interested in joining? If they can refer you to others, contact those other people and ask them the same questions.

Follow up contacts

Often people will tell you, ‘I’ll ask around and see what I can find out for you.’ Sometimes they do ask around; sometimes they forget almost immediately, or a crisis happens at work and they haven’t the time. If you don’t hear from them within a week or so, call them back to see if they’ve managed to find anything out.
Sometimes it seems as if no one will do anything for you or ask around on your behalf. It can be frustrating, but you should stay very polite and pleasant in your dealings with your contacts. After all, you’re asking them for a favour.

Follow up leads

After your initial networking efforts and research, you’ll probably have a long list of new people to try and make connections with. A phone call may be enough, or you might want to arrange a meeting with them to introduce yourself and ask them more specific questions about their company or industry.

Networking wisdom

• Whenever you meet someone new, exchange business cards with them (or at least get one from your new contact, so you can send them your details).
• Show your appreciation for the help you receive by sending a thank-you note, or by telling your contact how their information helped you, even if it only led indirectly to a job prospect.
• Think laterally about where to find network contacts. You can find people to add to your network almost anywhere.
• Get involved in a civic, social, religious or sporting organisation that interests you. As you meet new people in the organisation, they can become new network contacts.
• Join a professional organisation related to your field. The meetings or related events are good opportunities for you to network with people in your field.
• Think about online networking, in forums and in chat rooms.
• Record and organise all your network contacts—for example, on a spreadsheet or index cards. Write down what you found out from them, and any follow-up you should do. This will help you organise your time and monitor your progress.

Keep networking

Even after you’ve found a job, keep networking. Networking isn’t just for getting a job; it can help you do your job better, and it’s a way of being part of your community and society.

Life is full of surprises. You never know when you might need your network contacts’ help in another job search.

Social networking

Social networking sites, such as LinkedIn and Twitter, are becoming increasingly important tools for both job seekers and employers. Learn how to use them – if you would like some help I can recommend a first rate social networking trainer

With thanks to Australia’s Myfuture website

Wendy Mason is the The Career Coach – helping you to find fresh perspectives on your Job Search and Career. She helps you work towards your goals and aspirations, in a way that fits in with both work and home life. Email her at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com,  find her on Skype at wendymason14, or call +44 (0) 2081239146 (02081239146 for UK callers) or +1 262 317 9016 if you are in the US.

A free trial/consultation allows you to try phone coaching from the comfort of your own home and without risk. Don’t forget to ask about the Summer Special Offer 

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  • Job Search:How to Negotiate Salary During a Job Offer
  • Job Search – Minding the Brand – Not Your Holiday Photo Please
  • Career Development – “Worst Case Scenario” – How To Handle Getting Fired
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Interview Preparation: Identify Your Strengths

Interview Preparation: Identify Your Strengths to show your Potential Career Performance

Interview Preparation – today’s guest post come from Tamara M. Williams who reads guides and books related to personal and career development and encourages you to do the same. Tamara publishes other articles, read more at http://ezinearticles.com/?expert=Tamara_M._Williams

Identifying your strengths is very important for interview preparation. Interviewers always ask about your strengths and how they can be applied to the job. Strengths demonstrate your accomplishments in life. Accomplishments are directly tied to areas that are your strong points. In addition, knowing your strengths help you to decide other industries you should work in and other qualifications that you should seek. Determine your strengths by following the steps below.

Identify all your academic qualifications: First, make a list of your academic qualifications. These would include all your associate, bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral degrees. These qualifications showed that you have the skills and knowledge needed in a particular field. For e.g. a BSc in Computer Science indicate that you have knowledge in creating applications using various programming languages. This also shows that you have Problem-solving skills.

Identify all your professional qualifications: Second, make a list of your professional qualifications. These were most likely obtained after gaining some work experience. These demonstrate that you have strengths in a particular subject, product or service in a specific industry. The qualifications are awarded by professional bodies. For e.g. the Associate or Fellow Chartered Certified Accountant (ACCA or FCCA) is conferred by the Association of Chartered Certified Accountants. This indicates knowledge in using Accounting software such as QuickBooks or Sage. You would also have Book-keeping / Budget skills.

Identify all your academic experience:  Third, identify all the clubs and societies that you participated in while at college or university. For e.g. being a member of a Performing Arts Club would indicate that you have Organization, Project Management and People skills. In addition, you could have knowledge of the various works of Shakespeare.

Identify all your professional experience: Finally, list all the companies that you worked with, your job titles and specific projects that you worked on and what you achieved. This list would include summer jobs, part-time and full-time work, internships and volunteer work. Once again what you achieved during your work assignments would show your strengths. For e.g. in one project you created the Company and Product/Service brochures. Then you presented this information at seminars and conferences. This means that you have Writing and Reporting, and Communication skills. Besides that shows knowledge of a particular product or service specific to that industry such as the Food and Beverage Industry.

Now that you have completed this exercise you are more prepared to answer questions related to your strengths when interviewing for a new job, promotion or a raise. This shows that your skills and knowledge gave you great achievements in the past and are capable of doing greater in the future. Remember to give yourself a pat on the back for all your hard work and good luck in your career! 

About the Author:

Tamara M. Williams reads guides and books related to personal and career development. She encourages you to do the same. Contact your college or university career center or a Life & Career Coach for more assistance. Tamara also publishes other articles, read more at http://ezinearticles.com/?expert=Tamara_M._Williams

Related articles

  • Why Telephone Coaching Works
  • Career Development – The Value of a Career Plan and Making One!
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  • Job Search: How to find a new job using LinkedIn!

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What Kind Of Leader Are You?

What Kind Of Leader Are You?

What kind of leader are you? So, if you had a choice, what kind of person would you want to follow? It is a good question to ask yourself if you are leader in any capacity – from a hobby group, a small work team to a major corporation.

Well, there are some obvious characteristics, aren’t there? For example, we would all want a leader who acted with integrity. Integrity is the very bedrock of trust and we all hope that we can trust the person who is showing us the way ahead.  As for me, I want to follow someone I can believe when they tell me it is safe to take a risk. I’m not going to walk across that rope bridge to a what you tell me is a bright future unless I believe that it really is strong enough to keep me out of the river. Now, sometimes of course you won’t know any more than I do – but you will certainly know how to find out as much as possible. And you’ll tell me clearly what the facts are and why I should take the risk anyway, if I should.

Then, of course, we want a leader who has a clear vision of where we are trying to go and can paint it in a way that we can see the destination too. We want someone who can paint the future in colours that lead us to have enough faith to step out with them. We need a message that gets us all turning in the same direction and marching a long together. That vision needs to be bright enough to illuminate the way.

Most of all we would like to follow a leader who wasn’t working for their own ends but for ours; a servant leader who is prepared to act with compassion. John Maxwell put it this way: “Servant-leaders never pursue a mission at the expense of their people. Rather, servant-leaders earn the loyalty and best efforts of their people by serving the interests and investing in the development of those they lead. A servant-leader wants to see others succeed.” Good leaders know that they’re only as good as the people who support them and so they invest time and energy in ensuring the well-being and success of their team.

What Kind Of Leader Are You?

So, what kind of leader are you? Are you demonstrating integrity, vision and compassion? If not, what changes do you plan to make? You will need to change something won’t you, if you are serious about your career and expect others to follow you.

If you would like some help in developing your leadership skills please get in touch. Good leaders are modest enough to know that working with a coach really can make a difference.

Wendy Mason is the The Career Coach – helping you to find fresh perspectives on your Job Search and Career. She helps you work towards your goals and aspirations, in a way that fits in with both work and home life. Email her at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com,  find her on Skype at wendymason14, or call +44 (0) 2081239146 (02081239146 for UK callers) or +1 262 317 9016 if you are in the US.

A free trial/consultation allows you to try phone coaching from the comfort of your own home and without risk. Don’t forget to ask about the Summer Special Offer 

 

 

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Getting Fired – How to handle it

Getting Fired – How to handle it

Career Development – Worst Case Scenario – How To Handle Getting Fired

Getting fired is miserable. Below is a great post from About.com Job Searching by the wonderful  on how to handle it. The employment law she refers to is American and you will need to check what applies in your country. But I believe the themes and her wise advice apply generally.

“Getting fired, unfortunately, can happen to the best of us. It can happen even when it’s not your fault. There could be a personality conflict between yourself and your supervisor. Your idea of what the job was going to be like might differ from what management was thinking. You could have simply screwed up. It happens. You’re not alone.

Wrongful Termination

Experts estimate that at least 250,000 workers are illegally or unjustly fired (wrongful termination) each year and that’s not counting those that were justifiably terminated. Regardless of the circumstances, what to do if you’ve been fired? Where do you go from here?

Getting Fired

First of all, don’t beat yourself up. As I said, getting fired can happen to the best of us. Don’t dwell on it. Instead, focus on what you are going to do next and how you are going to find another job. Keeping in mind that another hurdle – the stigma of being fired – has just been added to your job search. That said, there are ways you can address this issue and put it in at least a neutral, if not a positive, light.

You can read the rest of the post at this link http://jobsearch.about.com/od/salary/a/fired.htm

The support of a career coach can make a huge difference in these circumstances and I offer a free taster coaching session if you would like some quick advice – contact details are below.

Wendy Mason is the The Career Coach – helping you to find fresh perspectives on your Job Search and Career. She helps you work towards your goals and aspirations, in a way that fits in with both work and home life. Email her at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com,  find her on Skype at wendymason14, or call +44 (0) 2081239146 (02081239146 for UK callers) or +1 262 317 9016 if you are in the US.

A free trial/consultation allows you to try phone coaching from the comfort of your own home and without risk. Don’t forget to ask about the Summer Special Offer 

 

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