How to Negotiate Salary

How to Negotiate Salary

Job Search:How to Negotiate Salary During a Job Offer

How to negotiate a salary – some very useful advice!

If you feel you lack confidence when faced with this kind of negotiation please get in touch with me!

Wendy Mason is the The Career Coach – helping you to find fresh perspectives on your Job Search and Career. She helps you work towards your goals and aspirations, in a way that fits in with both work and home life. Email her at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com,  find her on Skype at wendymason14, or call +44 (0) 2081239146 (02081239146 for UK callers) or +1 262 317 9016 if you are in the US.

A free trial/consultation allows you to try phone coaching from the comfort of your own home and without risk. Don’t forget to ask about the Summer Special Offer 

  • Job Search and Career Development:How to Perfect Your Elevator Pitch
  • Managing Your Career – Getting On With People At Work!
  • Job Search: 12 Top Really Practical Tips for Successful Interviews
  • Career Development – 3 Things Your Manager Hasn’t Told You That You Need to Hear

 

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Getting On With People At Work!

Getting On With People At Work!

Managing Your Career – Getting On With People At Work!

Getting on with people! One the hardest lessons we have to learn in life, is that we will meet people who don’t like us.

Sometimes this will be for reasons that we understand.  But sometimes it won’t! And, of course, sometimes we may find ourselves not liking someone and it may be very hard to know why.

How we respond depends very much on the circumstances.

If you find yourself, for example, sitting next to someone on a plane for a journey that lasts an hour, it make very little difference whether you like each other or not. But when the person you are having difficulties with is your new boss, a colleague or an employee, that does matters. It matters a lot!

First, if you are dealing with your own feelings of dislike, try to work out why you feel like that.  What is it about this person that you find difficult?  Take some time to think about the issue.  Is it how they look? Is it something they have said or done? Sometimes, we dislike those who remind us of people or experiences in our own past. Take time to reflect and then be completely honest with yourself.

If you have a sense of mistrust, then try to work out why? Is there any evidence to support how you feel?

Be very honest about your own prejudices. If the way you feel is about their race, their age or their sexual persuasion, then you have some really hard work to do. This problem is yours to resolve, not theirs.

When you have feelings of dislike, work on valuing the individual and the contribution they make.

If the issue is to do with bad memories, seek the help of a coach or counsellor.

If it is about prejudice then again seek out support from a trainer or coach if you are serious about your career. Be honest and brave enough to seek help.

If someone dislikes you, then again, see if you can work out why and try to put things right.  If the person is, for example, a new boss, then you may have to take your confidence in both hands and ask for an explanation.  Try to make sure the boss really does understand how you are contributing to the work and be prepared to share your knowledge and, on occasion, your contacts.  In other words turn yourself into an asset.

Above all keep the lines of communication open.  Never fight with the boss! At the end of the day, it really is better to move on, if you can’t find the middle ground.

If the problem is with a colleague or an employee again work hard to find out why and then find the middle ground, while being scrupulously fair. At the end of the day, with a professional approach you should be able to find a way to work together even though you may not be best buddies.

Getting on with people at work is important. You don’t owe those you work with undying affection, nor do they owe that to you.  But you do owe them a fair chance to do their work well and a fair hearing if they have a problem.  You should be able to expect the same in return.

Wendy Mason is the The Career Coach – helping you to find fresh perspectives on your Job Search and Career. She helps you work towards your goals and aspirations, in a way that fits in with both work and home life. Email her at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com,  find her on Skype at wendymason14, or call +44 (0) 2081239146 (02081239146 for UK callers) or +1 262 317 9016 if you are in the US.

A free trial/consultation allows you to try phone coaching from the comfort of your own home and without risk. Don’t forget to ask about the Summer Special Offer 

 

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Tips for Successful Interviews

Tips for Successful Interviews

Job Search: 12 Top Really Practical Tips for Successful Interviews

Tips for successful interviews! This short video from PFJ media has 12 really practical tips that you can’t afford to ignore

If you would like some help getting ready for your interview – please get in touch – I offer a free taster coaching session by phone or Skype

Wendy Mason is the The Career Coach – helping you to find fresh perspectives on your Job Search and Career. She helps you work towards your goals and aspirations, in a way that fits in with both work and home life. Email her at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com,  find her on Skype at wendymason14, or call +44 (0) 2081239146 (02081239146 for UK callers) or +1 262 317 9016 if you are in the US.

A free trial/consultation allows you to try phone coaching from the comfort of your own home and without risk. Don’t forget to ask about the Summer Special Offer 

  • Job Search – The Interview – Competency Based Interview Questions and Answers
  • Job Search – Mistakes to Avoid in Your Telephone Interview
  • Management and Career Development:The Joys of Office Politics
  • Friday Quotes – Inspiration – Change

 

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Things your manager doesn’t tell you!

 

 

Things your manager doesn’t tell you!

Things your manager doesn’t tell you! Levo is a community of professional women seeking advice, inspiration, and the tools needed to succeed. I found this great post Melissa Stanger, the Associate Editor at Levo League on their website. You can find out more at the link below

Career Development – 3 Things Your Manager Hasn’t Told You That You Need to Hear

Keeping the lines of communication open with your manager is an essential tool to manage that relationship. However, just because the lines are open on your end doesn’t mean they’re always open on your manager’s end.

Here are three things your manager is probably thinking but, for whatever reason, hasn’t told you. They may be difficult to hear, but they’re going to make your life at work a whole lot easier.

1. “I can tell when you’re not listening to me.”
You may think your habit of daydreaming while your manager talks is pretty inconspicuous, but trust me, she knows when you’re not 100 percent present. In a previous job, when I was still really new to the workforce, my manager at the time had a habit of hashing out her thoughts out loud. During one of our meetings she was going over an item I thought didn’t really have much to do with me, and I started thinking about something else (probably lunch). She paused and gave me a searching look.

“I don’t know if you realize, but your eyes tend to glaze over when you’re not listening,” she said.

I’m lucky it was just the two of us meeting or I would have been even more mortified than I was already. But I learned a valuable lesson that day: Your boss can tell when you’re not paying attention. Even if you think she can’t tell, she totally can. And if you want to prove you deserve more responsibility at work, force yourself to pay attention to and get involved with other responsibilities at work. Actively listen and offer your insight, even if they’re things that don’t have anything to do with you right now. They might in the future.

2. “There’s a reason I micromanage you.” ... read the rest at 

http://www.levoleague.com/career-advice/things-your-manager-should-tell-you

Wendy is the The Career Coach – helping you to find fresh perspectives on your Job Search and Career. She helps you work towards your goals and aspirations, in a way that fits in with both work and home life. Email her at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com,  find her on Skype at wendymason14, or call +44 (0) 2081239146 (02081239146 for UK callers) or +1 262 317 9016 if you are in the US.

A free trial/consultation allows you to try phone coaching from the comfort of your own home and without risk. Don’t forget to ask about the Summer Special Offer 

  • Job Search – The Interview – Competency Based Interview Questions and Answers
  • Job Search – Mistakes to Avoid in Your Telephone Interview
  • Management and Career Development:The Joys of Office Politics
  • Friday Quotes – Inspiration – Change

 

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Interview Checklist

Interview Checklist

Job Search – The Interview Checklist

Interview checklist – are you ready for that interview? This interview checklist will take you step by step you through everything you need to do to be a success!

What are you going to wear?

The first impression you make on a potential employer can make a big difference. So you need to dress appropriately for a job interview – check out what passes for appropriate business dress in the organization you wish to join. Ask around among your contacts; but note, a business suit is usually standard. Have your interview outfit ready to go, so you can be ready for an interview at very short notice. If you are being interviewed online with a camera switched on, think about how you will look and make sure the background is business like.  Check how you will look before you go online

Review your response to the advert and job description

Take the time to remind yourself how you meet the requirement. Then make sure you have your list available for the interview of exactly how you meet the skills, knowledge and qualities required by the employer. Emphasize those most important for success in the job. Be ready to describe successes you have had that make you the perfect match for the job. The closer your qualifications and experience match the job requirements, the better chance you’ll have of getting a second round interview and a job offer.

Research the organization and those interviewing you

How much do you know about the organization itself? Before you go to the interview be sure you are well informed. Do an internet search and use LinkedIn.

Use your contacts

Do you know anyone who is working at the organization or who has worked there recently? Knowing someone can make a big difference – they might be able to put in a good word for you. Plus your contacts can help you with inside information about the organization, its people and, possibly, the recruitment process itself.

Prepare for Interview Questions

Take time to think through questions you are likely to be asked during the interview. This will help you to organize your answers and it will help to reduce stress.  Ask a friend or family or family member to help you practice your answers – if they are prepared to give you a mock interview so much the better.

Prepare for a presentation

Check whether a presentation is required and then find out as much as possible about the subject.  If they don’t suggest one, then concentrate on showing how you are fitted and how you would approach the job.  Prepare your materials well in advance if you can and have spare copies. Have handouts ready and to a good quality – again take enough for the panel and some spares.  Check out what technology and other material will be available for your use.  If using your own equipment, make sure it is working properly on the day. Don’t assume you can use your own without making inquiries first and ask about plugs etc. Run through your presentation, preferably in front of as friend, beforehand.

Have Clear Travel Directions and Allow Plenty of time

It’s important to know where you need to go for your job interview. You don’t want to be late so start in good time. Use Google Maps to get directions if you’re not sure where you are going.  Check on parking and/or public transport so you arrive with time to spare.

Time to relax!

Check out your appearance when you arrive and then use a simple breathing technique to help you relax – here is a link to one; http://www.yourhappinessfactor.net/2011/02/angry-frustrated-and-stressed-relax-and.html

I hope you have found this Interview Checklist useful.  Now go in there and wow them.  I wish you every success and if you would like some extra help, please get in touch.

Wendy is the The Career Coach – helping you to find fresh perspectives on your Job Search and Career. She helps you work towards your goals and aspirations, in a way that fits in with both work and home life. Email her at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com,  find her on Skype at wendymason14, or call +44 (0) 2081239146 (02081239146 for UK callers) or +1 262 317 9016 if you are in the US.

A free trial/consultation allows you to try phone coaching from the comfort of your own home and without risk. Don’t forget to ask about the Summer Special Offer 

  • Job Search – The Interview – Competency Based Interview Questions and Answers
  • Job Search – Mistakes to Avoid in Your Telephone Interview
  • Job Search – Do Your Email Address and Voicemail Message Help Your Job Search?
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Looking Professional

Looking Professional

Job Search – Minding the Brand – Not Your Holiday Photo Please

Looking professional! So there I was sending out invitations to various contacts and I hit on one name I hadn’t seen for a while. It was a former colleague, so off I went to look at her profile to see what she’d been doing recently and there it was, that same old photo.

Well, you might say, be fair, there is a certain very flattering photo of you that has been on one website for a very long time. Yes, that is true.  But that isn’t her problem; my old chum has chosen to put on her professional profile, a not very flattering photo taken on holiday. True,  now she isn’t looking for work and,  for her, good old LI is just a way of keeping in touch with people. But suppose that were to change?

Now, she isn’t the only one.  I know others who have non-holiday and posed photos on their profile. But they still do not look at their best.  Some seem to have been taken with the giggles and others seem to think that looking professional equates to looking grim.

I’m not sure why they have not worked out that looking professional means looking like someone you would want to work with or do business with.

On top of that, remember, that these days potential employers may search social media for more information about you.  Those photos you are tagged in that were taken on the “stag” or “hen” in Benidorm are not going to work to your advantage.

So,  why not carry out an internet search on your name and check that what comes up promotes your professional brand.  Anything that doesn’t  see if you can delete it, or at least, remove the tags!

And in future guard pictures of you that appear on-line quite carefully – you never know what potential employer may be watching. Don’t let your photo “mistakes” come back to haunt you.

In job search and career development you are the brand – it is up to you to protect yourself. Looking professional really matters.

Wendy is the The Career Coach – helping you to find fresh perspectives on your Job Search and Career. She helps you work towards your goals and aspirations, in a way that fits in with both work and home life. Email her at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com,  find her on Skype at wendymason14, or call +44 (0) 2081239146 (02081239146 for UK callers) or +1 262 317 9016 if you are in the US.

A free trial/consultation allows you to try phone coaching from the comfort of your own home and without risk. Don’t forget to ask about the Summer Special Offer 
  • Why Telephone Coaching Works
  • Job Search Techniques To Help You Stand Out From The Crowd
  • Gestures and Body Language Tutorial
  • Job Search – Dealing With The Killer Interview Questions
  • Job Search and Career Development:How to Perfect Your Elevator Pitch

 

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Elevator Pitch

Elevator Pitch

Job Search and Career Development:How to Perfect Your Elevator Pitch

Elevator Pitch! Be ready to pitch your skills or business quickly, succinctly, and impressively when opportunities arise.

This video is from Howcast: http://howc.st/ytmainplaylists

If you need help with your Elevator Pitch, please get in touch!

Wendy is the The Career Coach – helping you to find fresh perspectives on your Job Search and Career. She helps you work towards your goals and aspirations, in a way that fits in with both work and home life. Email her at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com,  find her on Skype at wendymason14, or call +44 (0) 2081239146 (02081239146 for UK callers) or +1 262 317 9016 if you are in the US.

A free trial/consultation allows you to try phone coaching from the comfort of your own home and without risk. Don’t forget to ask about the Summer Special Offer 
  • Why Telephone Coaching Works
  • Job Search Techniques To Help You Stand Out From The Crowd
  • Gestures and Body Language Tutorial
  • Job Search – Dealing With The Killer Interview Questions
  • Management and Career Development:The Joys of Office Politics
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Office Politics

Office Politics

Management and Career Development:The Joys of Office Politics

Office Politics: Politics – A definition – “activities aimed at improving someone’s status or increasing power within an organization” Oxford Dictionaries

This is a re-post, with some slight amendments, of something I wrote a while ago. But I think it is useful and I hope you will agree!

I don’t play chess.  I admire those who do – for me the game is too slow to enjoy.  But I do know the rules!

For me, Office Politics is just like that.  You may decide not to ‘play’ but you do need to know how the game works.

This is true in most work situations but particularly if  you lead or manage a vital project or programme.  If you don’t manage your stakeholders, your initiative may be shot down in ways you never expected.

Stakeholder management (managing those with an interest in what you are doing) doesn’t work if you don’t make sure you understand the politics of the organisation and your particular part of it.

Wherever you have a group of people, you will have a degree of politics operating.

People will usually jockey for position, form alliances, decide who they do like and who they don’t!  They will come to the group with different personalities, sets of values and opinions. Over time a group/team develops a set of norms or standards and ways of working. They develop a pecking order – a hierarchy of status and influence.  This may not necessarily reflect the organisation chart.  For example, the person who controls the stationery cupboard can have quite a lot of power to disrupt their colleague’s day, if they choose to do so, in lots of offices!

If you don’t understand the influence-hierarchy you can find it difficult to get things done, particularly if you are new to an organisation.  And the hierarchy will change over time, as people strive successfully and unsuccessfully to achieve greater influence.

You need to understand the office politics, even if you find the concept distasteful. And, you will be very lucky indeed if someone actually tells you the rules of the game! It is far better to understand what is going on and  adopt a strategy to keep the negative effects of office politics on you and your work to a minimum.

In reality, it is useful to be regarded as inside the influence group, rather than outside looking in. What you are probably best to aim for is to manage any effects of office politics that directly relate to you!  Then turn them in your favour, or at least minimise any possible harmful e effects on you and your work.

Office politics in its crudest form usually occurs when one, or more than one, person holds (or is seen as holding) a significant amount of power within the office.  This may be formal power – the CEO’s private office is usually a hotbed of office politics – or informal power. Formal power is pretty easy to read. And, for example, PAs to top managers, who may all wield considerable power,  are fairly easy to discover.  Informal power is generally much more difficult to identify and work with. 

Informal power can arise in a number of ways! Someone with depth of knowledge of the organisation, the key subject matter expert, can accrue significant amounts of informal power.    And sometimes this informal power can be abused; for example, the ‘office bully’ or those in a relationship with someone holding formal power who are unscrupulous players of the office politics’ game.  You need to listen and observe the group you work with and its surrounding organisation to find out more about these!

What can you do to make office politics work for you?

  1. Try to get to know the politically powerful within your organisation.  Don’t be afraid of them – they are often much, more receptive to people who aren’t intimidated by them!  
  2. Make sure they understand what you are trying to achieve.  Deal with their reservations and make sure they understand that you are taking on board their views.   
  3. If someone does try to undermine you, don’t get drawn in. Simply be bold and assertive, but not aggressive.  Make your points clearly and offer good will.  If their negative behaviour persists, then ring-fence them – make sure they have as little as possible to do with your work.
  4. People often play office politics because they are unsure about their own abilities and achievements.  They try to conceal what they believe are their shortcomings behind a façade and to make others feel they are less worthy. Don’t let them undermine your self-esteem – be proud of your own accomplishments and make sure that your efforts are recognised by those who matter. 
  5. Don’t get into direct competition if you can avoid it – it’s a waste of your time! If people know you are doing a good job consistently there is far less opportunity for you to be undermined. 
  6. Forming alliances with senior managers and using them as sponsors and champions for your work can increase your own informal power.  If you have a formal sponsor, make sure they are well informed and really up to date with your project or programme and can talk about it fluently to their colleagues.   As with all stakeholder management – targeted communication of  good quality of information is key to you and your project or programme’s success.

If you want to know more or do want to play the office politics game then here are some books that might be useful!

‘Office Politics: How work really works’ by Guy Browning   http://amzn.to/efTzjO

‘100+ Tactics for Office Politics (Barron’s Business Success)’ by Casey Hawley   http://amzn.to/hkBR6r

For the really evil!

’21 Dirty Tricks at Work: How to Win at Office Politics’ by Mike Phipps, Colin Gautrey http://amzn.to/fFMHQ4

I have started a new Career Development Group on LinkedIn where you will find lots of tips and other resources in due course – you can join it by clicking here 

Wendy is the The Career Coach – helping you to find fresh perspectives on your Job Search and Career. She helps you work towards your goals and aspirations, in a way that fits in with both work and home life. Email her at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com,  find her on Skype at wendymason14, or call +44 (0) 2081239146 (02081239146 for UK callers) or +1 262 317 9016 if you are in the US.

A free trial/consultation allows you to try phone coaching from the comfort of your own home and without risk. Don’t forget to ask about the Summer Special Offer 

CV review and interview preparation and coaching to improve your confidence and self esteem are a speciality[wpsocialite]

  • Why Telephone Coaching Works
  • Job Search Techniques To Help You Stand Out From The Crowd
  • Gestures and Body Language Tutorial
  • Job Search – Dealing With The Killer Interview Questions
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Professional looking email address

Professional looking email address

Job Search – Do Your Email Address and Voicemail Message Help Your Job Search?

Professional looking email address – your email address and voice mail message are part of your personal brand. They send a message about you to potential employers. When you are applying to jobs you need to make sure that they say the right things.

You need to have a professional looking email address and a voice mail message that sounds warm and friendly but also business like. Jokey email addresses, and those which look like they are meant for a family, are not going to work to your advantage. Exactly the same thing goes for your voice mail message – this is not the time for that celebrity voice – nor friendly family greetings or jokes. An employer will consider an unprofessional voicemail message like this means you are not professional in your approach.

Here are some guidelines to getting it right!

Voicemail message

  1. Before you record your message think about what you are going to say – it can be a good idea to write your message down
  2. Include your name in the message, mention you’re unavailable to answer the phone. Then ask them to leave their name, number and message, and say you will get back to them as soon as possible. (Then do that, of course)
  3. Keep it simple. For example, “Hi, this is Simon Jones. I’m sorry I’m unable to take your call now, but please leave your name, number and message after the tone and I’ll return your call as soon as possible. Thank you.”
  4. Take time and trouble recording your message – find a quiet place with no background noise of any kind
  5. Speak clearly, and sound professional and polite when recording your greeting.
  6. If you want to be taken seriously avoid background noise including the sound of the family, joke messages and any kind of gimmick.

Email address

  1. Consider creating a new email address specifically for your job search. This will help to prioritize your job search emails.
  2. If possible, include your name in your email address, for example firstname.lastname@abc.com. That will make it much easier for a potential employer to find your emails in their inbox or folder.
  3. You could create an email address that corresponds to the work you do or your profession, for example simonjonesprojectmanager@abc.com if is appropriate.
  4. Make sure your email address is as simple, logical and easy to type as possible – long strings of numbers may well generate mistakes. That might mean you lose out on a precious job offer.

Your email address and voicemail message are key to your personal brand in your job search. Keep them clear, simple and professional. Then they will increase, not decrease, the chances of you being contacted by an employer.
In job search, paying attention to these small details can greatly improve your prospects of being hired.

I have started a new Job Search Group on LinkedIn where you will find lots of tips and other resources in due course – you can join it by clicking here 

Wendy is the The Career Coach – helping you to find fresh perspectives on your Job Search and Career.  Career Coach. Wendy, helps you work towards your goals and aspirations, in a way that fits in with both work and home life. Email her at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com,  find her on Skype at wendymason14, or call +44 (0) 2081239146 (02081239146 for UK callers) or +1 262 317 9016 if you are in the US.

A free trial/consultation allows you to try phone coaching from the comfort of your own home and without risk. Don’t forget to ask about the Summer Special Offer 

CV review and interview preparation and coaching to improve your confidence and self esteem are a speciality[wpsocialite]

  • Why Telephone Coaching Works
  • Job Search Techniques To Help You Stand Out From The Crowd
  • Gestures and Body Language Tutorial
  • Job Search – Dealing With The Killer Interview Questions
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Project Management – Tips

 Project Management – Tips

Project Management – Tips! Today we have a guest post from Nate Miller, a part-time guest-blogger. His main interests are Business with a recent focus on Education and Technology. He is constantly extending his fields of interest to incorporate news suggested to him by his readers. He is currently interning at Domo. Make sure to follow him on his business intelligence blog.

Multiple Project Management – Tips

Multi-tasking is almost always tricky business. It can be seriously difficult to do just one major project at a time, never mind trying to juggle multiple. But the fact of the matter is that sometimes you just have to deal with several projects at once since schedules won’t allow for it to be done any other way. Fortunately, there are a few methods you can use for staying sane during the process and getting everything done on time.

Use Project Management Software

There are many different programs you can use to keep track of projects. For example, Microsoft Project is a piece of software that helps you maintain and manage projects effectively. This sort of management is crucial for not getting left behind or getting confused on which project you’re doing. One of the major benefits of this software is that it integrates with other pieces of Microsoft software. For example, there’s a seamless option to transfer files to project from Word, Excel, and so on. So if you are working on projects within these other programs, you can use Project to keep track of them all or mix them together, as the case may be.

After all, sometimes multiple projects will combine together or overlap for the sake of other larger projects. It can be much easier to have a program to help with the organization rather than trying to do all of it yourself in the long run. It can help to experiment with different programs until you find one that you’re comfortable with before settling down to learn every aspect of it. After all, the process of learning a project management program can be fairly time consuming.

Keep Organized

It’s also important to keep notes for the individual projects and organize them all separately. For example, it can be useful to create separate folders for each project. That way you’ll make sure that you don’t accidentally get projects confused. It can be easy to misplace some of the files from projects so that they get stuck in with other projects if you aren’t careful. This is especially likely to happen if you have a lot of projects and a lot of files for each.

For example, if you give files for different projects a similar name, like something with “project.doc,” then you could easily open and work on the wrong one if you don’t have them all in different folders. It can help to name not just the folder, but also every one of the files something related to the project so that you have no chance of getting confused.

After all, it’s easy to get confused when you have multiple projects all happening at the same time.

Overall, finding out as many different methods for managing multiple projects at the same time as you can is important. You can easily find business intelligence, blog after blog on the Internet on this subject as well, to get additional ideas. There are no shortage of possibilities for organization including a wide assortment of management programs and apps. 

Writer Biography

This is a guest post by Nate Miller, a part-time guest-blogger. His main interests are Business with a recent focus on Education and Technology. He is constantly extending his fields of interest to incorporate news suggested to him by his readers. He is currently interning at Domo. Make sure to follow him on his  business intelligence blog.

 

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